Bondo vs Latex Putty?

Page 1 of 2  
I have to fill some rotted areas in the exterior frame of some windows. I already have some latex exterior putty which I can build up in layers. The areas in question are about as wide as a pencil and maybe twice that deep. I've heard that some people use Bondo for these situations. Is there a good reason to prefer that product?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 25 Jun 2009 16:11:18 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Bondo is essentially a "rubber" putty, cures faster and hardens better than a latex putty. Resists water and takes well to paints.
I've seen Bondo used on a couple of doors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

bondo is talc added to putty, and isn't resistent to water unless it's covered with something. it will be harder than a latex putty.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 25 Jun 2009 13:38:18 -0700, "charlie"

I know Bondo resist staining. The wood sucks up the stain first. Paint is the best cover up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nonsense. Bondo is a two-part polyester resin, with various fillers of which talc is only one of several. Polyester resin isn't the same thing as putty. Bondo includes a hardener. Putty doesn't.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Can it be primed with something like Kilz, or does it need something special?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 25 Jun 2009 17:57:38 -0400, "JoeSpareBedroom"

Yes! No.
Cover the Bondo with paint - Not Stains!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've used Bondo several times before, for exactly the purpose you're proposing, and it's worked well. I always used an oil-based primer on it. No idea if a latex primer would work or not, but it sure oughta be primed with something.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
charlie wrote:

Bondo is talc (and other minerals) added to *polyester resin*, not putty. It cures when a catalyst is added. When cured it is reasonably hard but not as hard as plain polyester resin or polyester resin with cab-o-sil. Talc in rock form is about as impervious as you can get, shouldn't be much different in powder form; polyester resin isn't affected by water.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not sure the definition of "putty" as used here, but the Bondo I am familar with is a 2-part epoxy product. I never getting long enough setting time but I've used it to repair dry rot after digging out the infected area and treating with a borax solution.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Latex putty will last 5 years, its junk. Bondo the 2 part epoxy will out last you and maybe the wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I disagree....Bondo is a polyester resin NOT an epoxy.
Epoxy is a better material & more expensive than Bondo.
For interior repairs, Bondo is fine, for exterior Bondo is "ok" except for redwood.
If you want an exterior repait to last use an epxoy ........like WoodEpox or LiquidWood from www. abatron.com
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought bondo was a type of epoxy since its two part, wont bondo painted last a super long-long time
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just because there is a hardener...doesn't necessarily make it an epoxy. (although, I am not a chemist)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

". . .(although, I am not a chemst). . ."
I am. Bondo is an unsaturated polyester resin which "sets" through the action of a peroxide hardener.
Misc stuff: -Reduce the peroxide level to slow the cure down and give more working time. Test your ratio, too little peroxide may not produce a complete cure.
-Good epoxy beats good polyester when exposed to weather. However, in this application, the wood will go first. You must measure the two parts correctly. Proportioning errors can produce degraded epoxy.
-Good epoxy costs more and can cause allergic reactions.
-I used painted Bondo ifor a rotted wood repair at my daughter's house in Tampa. Looks good after 4 years.
-Jason
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It works great on interior apps, exterior as well but NOT good on redwood!
I've had Bondo fail miserably on redwood window sills. The Bondo repairs are were primed & painted with very good oil based primer. The repair failed in less than a year.
I called Bondo tech rep & got the comment "we don't recommend it for use on redwood".
After that I switched to epoxy (www.abatron.com) for all exterior wood repairs.
here's the best comparison I could find
http://www.redrockstore.com/resin.htm
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have some French doors where a dog scratched pretty deep into the wood that surrounds the glass panels.
Would your recommendations work for that if I build it up in layers?
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WhiteTea77581 wrote:

You don't need layers with either polyester or epoxy "putties". Best to overfill slightly and cut off most of excess with a chisel after it has set but still not really hard. Sand smooth when fully cured. OR - just over fill and sand flush.
The nice thing about Bondo (polyester putty) is that you can control the set time to a degree. Even setting slowly it is *much* faster (minutes) than epoxies (overnight); additionally, it doesn't blush amines like epoxy nor does it degrade under UV like epoxy.
With either, you need to *thoroughly* mix the resin with the catalyst. With Bondo, the colored "cream" hardners are easier to use than liquid as the color tells you visually how well they are mixed.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the good info.
I think I will go with Bondo.
I am going to build a "form" for the repair using some scrap wood. But it will be a while, the temp right now is 101 degrees.
Take care,
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
WhiteTea77581 wrote:

You really don't need a form but if you use one you'll have to do something to keep the Bondo from sticking to it. Wax works but could be a problem when painting.

If it's you that is suffering I empathisize; if you are worrying about the Bondo, don't...heat just cures it faster.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.