Bondo to fill in spots on concrete porch

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I am (STILL!!) working on repainting my concrete porch (approx 10x10 + 2 steps). Scraping off decades of paint is a bitch. Earlier layers oil-based; later ones water-based (California banned oil-based). Uneven wearing. Spots that look like beaches on a lake...various depths.
In past years I used SOMETHING ???? to fill in that did not wear well.
Paint store heard my sad story & said Bondo could be used to fill in low spots.
Bondo possible?
TIA
HB
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Of course its possible. I *LOVE* Bondo. But not on a horizontal surface that is going to get walked on. Unless the spots are really small.
Go rent a floor sander. The big square vibrating ones are easy to use, no chance of digging divots into the floor.
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dadiOH
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wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca;3134473 Wrote:

Yes, it might be, but paint isn't.
You move the machine to the left and the right and when you see you're exposing the concrete, you move on to the next section.
This method is commonly used to sand the polyurethane off of hardwood floors, and so as long as you don't try to sand the concrete down, it'll work on a porch.
In fact, one Canadian janitorial equipment manufacturer, Centaur, makes a floor machine called the "Woodpecker" specifically for sanding the polyurethane off hardwood floors. It is used along with a vaccuum cleaner to simultaneously vaccuum up the sanding dust created.
http://tinyurl.com/kth24az
http://tinyurl.com/lh33vur
And besides, at $5 to $15 max for a sanding screen, you can remove a lot of paint for $10.
You just have to be careful using it on concrete because high productivity pads are only about half the thickness of a regular floor machine pad. A person could always use two high productivity pads and a Big Mouth to hold them concentric.
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nestork

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So it is. No idea why I read "concrete" but thought "wood".
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She reverse-plonked you? I don't believe I've heard that one.
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Use DuraGlas
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Bondo makes a filler with fiberglass also, but I've never tried it.
Be prepared for some tough sanding.
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On 10/15/2013 07:52 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I don't really like Bondo because it'll suck in water (lots of talc as a filler)
Alternate idea - heat gun or torch to get *all* the old paint off, then etch with muriatic acid and paint as per usual?
nate
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On Tuesday, October 15, 2013 7:08:30 PM UTC-7, Nate Nagel wrote:

Possible. Up to now, apply Jason, cover, let work, scrape. Takes time and work to clear a 3x3' area. Take forever to do 10x10 plus steps. I don't have very powerful torch, but I guess I could try a small area...
Appreciate all suggestions!
HB

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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 19:29:25 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

you have ANOTHER hole to fill, and concrete bits embedded in your face/whatever.
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On 10/15/2013 11:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

True... I'm surprised it's so hard to get the old paint off though. Last place I lived a hot sunny day would lift big bubbles of paint off the porch. I would just go out with a scraper and take more off :) Almost got it clean before I moved...
nate
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On Tuesday, October 15, 2013 7:08:30 PM UTC-7, Nate Nagel wrote:

Nate: Afterthought. Would the Bondo still "suck in water" if covered with 1 coat primer & 2 coats paint? Or do you mean during process of applying Bondo to eroded spots?
HB
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On Tue, 15 Oct 2013 19:37:53 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

vinyl-ester resin and chopped fiberglass might work though.
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Or fumed silica (as a filler). Brand names are Cab-o-Sil and Aero-Sil. Mixed with epoxy to the consistency of Vaseline or peanut butter. Sets up hard and clear. UV degrades epoxy so needs to be painted.
Good supplier of resins, fillers, etc... http://www.uscomposites.com/
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On 10/15/2013 10:37 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Unless perfectly coated, it'll draw damp - and on a concrete slab it still might from the backside. This I learned from working on old cars in western PA - any Bondo repair *must* be 100% coated - e.g. if you use it to fill a pinholed section of metal, unless you paint and put some tar on the backside of the panel, it'll rust out again faster than if you'd done nothing at all.
I have no experience using it on concrete, but my spidey sense says that it might cause the paint to lift due to changing moisture levels.
nate
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wrote:

Talc is about the most impermeable mineral around. That's why they used to - maybe still do - use it for chem lab counters.
Used in that manner, there is no need to seal it; in fact, you *CAN'T seal it, sealer won't penetrate. And yes, I know that people sometimes apply mineral oil but the oil isn't soaking in, just sits on top and colors the surface by making it look wet.
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On 10/15/2013 3:16 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

I've used it on my swimming pool deck. It holds up pretty well. I pressure wash first. I've been considering using an epoxy primer *prior* to applying.
Bondo does shrink a little and it's not a permanent solution. I use household Bondo quite a bit. Pretty handy stuff to have around. If that DuraGlas doesn't shrink it might work better.
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On Tuesday, October 15, 2013 4:16:04 PM UTC-4, Higgs Boson wrote:

I've used Top'n Bond many times over the years for concrete filling.
Paul
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There's also Quikrete Concrete Resurfacer. I did my very badly pitted garage floor with this product a couple of years ago. We don't park any cars in the garage, so I'm not surprised that it's stood up very well to foot traffic.
http://www.quikrete.com/productlines/concreteresurfacer.asp
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On Tuesday, October 15, 2013 7:06:01 PM UTC-7, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Interesting.
The site said "      QUIKRETE® Concrete Resurfacer (No. 1131) is a special blend of portland c ement, sand, polymer modifiers and other additives. Designed to provide a s hrinkage compensated repair material for making ***thin repairs*** to sound concrete in need of surface renewal. Can be squeegee, trowel or brush appl ied.
What do you think they mean by "thin repairs". The "leprosy" spots on my c oncrete porch are mostly *less* than 1" deep. Would the Quikcrete product w ork?
TIA
HB
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