Bonding PVC to rubber?

I've got an adhesion challenge of dealing with 2 dissimilar materials in a backyard project.
I'm using two DOERR stock feeder tanks filled with sand as homes for my horseshoe pitching stakes. The tanks are mostly buried underground except that the top edge is above ground with 2" exposed. This edge is actually a totally closed hollow rim that roughly resembles the shape of a torus (hollow ring). I suppose being rounded makes that top edge more friendly and smooth to the necks of the horse and cattle population while they stretch and reach for their regular drinks of water; plus, perhaps less vulnerable to cracking that could start from a straight sharp edge, then propagate down the wall and threaten the containers properties.
The base material looks like PVC but that's a guess.
I'd like to protect this rim against the occasional impact of a steel pitching horseshoe.
Today I picked up a huge truck rubber tire tube that could serve as a bumper if I fastened a strip to the top rim of the tank. the rubber is a robust 1/8" thick. I believe the tank material is some 1/16" thick.
Fastening the two materials may be my biggest challenge.
I've thought about using those "butterfly screws" readily available at hardware stores. They're real handy for fastening items to thin walls. The top rim of my tanks fit that description. One problem is that they would be vulnerable with the impact of a 2 1/2 lb stray horseshoe.
Then I've got an unopened tube of Super Glue. That's supposed to work on any material combo.
I've got an unused bottle of Gorilla glue but I'm not sure about its adhesion to these materials.
I've also got nearly a quart of Bondo Gel left over from a recent project. It comes with a tube of hardener and the mix must be quickly used before it hardens. I'd love to use this as I've got plenty to do this project but see nothing in its specs about bonding to rubber. I suppose it also would be vulnerable to impact as this stuff appears to be brittle when cured.
What are your thoughts?
Len
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2 stainless steel hose clamps.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Bonding-PVC-to-rubber-595388-.htm EdsonHandyman wrote: 2 possible suggestions #1 : If the tire tube is large enough to go all the way around the buried tank, dig the soil back on both inside and outside of the tank. Lay the tire tube on the rim to be protected and bury it in the soil to hold it in place. Suggestion #2 : Pick up a length (at automotive store) of rubber hose long enough to go all the around the rim to be protected. Split the hose the long way and slip it over the rim to be protected. A 100% rubber silicon will hold it in place. Make sure both surfaces to be siliconed are clean.
Hope this helps.... Doug....
fatfreek wrote:

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Hi Edson,
I'll look into that rubber hose tip. Sounds promising, thanks.
Len
"EdsonHandyman" wrote in message
responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Bonding-PVC-to-rubber-595388-.htm EdsonHandyman wrote: 2 possible suggestions #1 : If the tire tube is large enough to go all the way around the buried tank, dig the soil back on both inside and outside of the tank. Lay the tire tube on the rim to be protected and bury it in the soil to hold it in place. Suggestion #2 : Pick up a length (at automotive store) of rubber hose long enough to go all the around the rim to be protected. Split the hose the long way and slip it over the rim to be protected. A 100% rubber silicon will hold it in place. Make sure both surfaces to be siliconed are clean.
Hope this helps.... Doug....
fatfreek wrote:

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On Sat, 23 Oct 2010 10:45:10 -0500, "fatfreek"

http://www.thistothat.com/index.shtml
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Hi Oren,
That ThisToThat site is exciting. Thanks.
Len
"Oren" wrote in message wrote:

http://www.thistothat.com/index.shtml
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I like the burial method suggested by another the best.
For glue I would use liquid nails or a clone. Worst case after a few hundred hits you have to repeat the glue.
--
Colbyt
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On 10/23/2010 11:45 AM, fatfreek wrote:

I'd buy some of the pool noodle foam things the kids use, slit them, and snap them over the tank edge, no glue needed. They only cost a couple bucks apiece, so even if you have to replace them yearly, no big deal. I see more slit pool noodles on car and truck roof racks than I do in pools, it seems. I don't think you are gonna have much luck bonding anything to those tanks- they are designed to be crud-impervious for easy cleaning.
--
aem sends...

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Hi AEM,
That sounds like a great tip which I'll look into. Thanks.
Len
"aemeijers" wrote in message
On 10/23/2010 11:45 AM, fatfreek wrote:

I'd buy some of the pool noodle foam things the kids use, slit them, and snap them over the tank edge, no glue needed. They only cost a couple bucks apiece, so even if you have to replace them yearly, no big deal. I see more slit pool noodles on car and truck roof racks than I do in pools, it seems. I don't think you are gonna have much luck bonding anything to those tanks- they are designed to be crud-impervious for easy cleaning.
--
aem sends...


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