Bolt Thread Size (Damn Metric Shit)

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snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE says...

~2M furlongs/fortnight (FSF system was used as an example of what not to use as a system of units in college physics)
--
Keith

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On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 16:02:46 GMT, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN"

Screw that. It's 800 rods per "hail mary". Work it out from there. (ok, about 48 million, depending on your ox. But if you're measuring time in fortnights, you should probably be measuring distance in leagues. )
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu says...

"Thy" father, not "my" father.
Anyway, that's 11 feet -- full fathom five would be one fathom and five feet. The 1 would be full size, the 5 a superscript.
USGS (and previously USCGS) charts refer to the plural as fathoms, not fathom, e.g. "Soundings in fathoms and feet, depth contours in fathoms."
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
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It's a trick of proportion. We average twice as tall as you guys, so the building standards are based on entirely different numbers.
<snicker ;->
In reality, Canada has evolved to a situation somewhat short of where Europe is. All official weights and measures are MKS (metric), such as surveys, standards etc. Schools teach very little of FPS (Imperial aka "english"). The latest generation can pretty much entirely avoid FPS until they're in the construction industry.
Residential construction _itself_ is still using an unchanged system almost identical to yours. 2x4s, 8x2 sheets of construction plywood, 12/16/24" joist spacing etc. We do see sheet goods with metric thickness measurements (eg: 11mm sheathing), and the odd bit of sheet goods (normally not for construction) with metric dimensions - eg: furniture grade plywoods or melamine - about an inch oversize.
It may seem confusing, but in practise it isn't.
I grew up in FPS, and now I'm equally comfortable in both systems. [Except pascals. I hate pascals. They should use mm of mercury - that I can visualize - it's been around far longer than our metric "conversion".]
Given the education system, and another generation, only a few industries will be doing much in the way of FPS, and we'll arrive in a situation where we'll be viewing construction practise in the same way you should be viewing that idiotic penny nail measurement "standard".
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Naaaah. You're an hour away. Drive faster, you get there sooner; slower, later. Who cares about the distance?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

...
,,,
I guess you didn't take the smiley at face value??? :)
But, strangely enough, some folks _do_ have a yen to know the distance---from my experience I hypothesis it tends to the folks in cities and areas which aren't amenable to straight-line navigation (such as the Eastern US w/ all the windy hills, etc.) that simply consider distances as time. Being in and from an area that is all laid off in sections, we navigate by section line and distances are what is the innate feeling. As my other post notes, it's a case of what one is familiar with, nothing else...
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dpb wrote:

Yep. Driving measures for me work best in miles as it is more easily converted from miles to time. Thus if something is 350 miles away I can pretty well instantly know that driving time will be 6-7 hours. Used to be before interstates that one could take the distance, divide by 50 (mph) and come remarkablyi close to the driving time. For me it still works even on freeways as I don't push as hard as I used to. Never have found anything using km that works as neatly. Best I can do is a conversion back to miles and figure it that way although I rarely bother. I do an annual trip in Canada.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Speed limits on highways in Canada are usually 100 kph*. If I have to drive 250 km, that takes 2.5 hours. If I need to go 75km, that will take three-quarters of an hour. Man, that metric stuff is tough.
*Some areas allow 110 kph.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

The trips I make are from Osooyoos to Kamloops up the Okanogan and the Coquihalla.
Speed limits are from 80 to 90 km on all 2 lane roads and 110 on the cog. Traffic with very few exceptions sticks very close to them. The annoying part is plugging along at 80 up the Okanogan behind someone moveing 75 and almost impossible to pass.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

Ooops. After thinking about that I don't recall any 90 on 2 lane. There are several stretches of 4-lane non-divided with 90. I haven't made the trip in a couple years now due to wife's medical but we are planning one this summer as soon as I get a passport in my hot little hand.
Harry K
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At least in Ontario, 90km is very rare. 4xx series highways (4 or more lanes) are defined as "divided" and are 100. All undivided highways are 80. The only 90 I'm immediately aware of is the undivided portions of the TransCanada (highway 17 in Ontario).
Alberta, of course, is slightly different, and I suspect BC is too.
Passport? You still only need a birth certificate and government photo-id (eg: driver's license). If you're a US or Canadian citizen of course. And that's mainly to get back into the US.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis wrote:

??? Hwy 69 and a couple of others (6 south Hamilton? anyway, not too uncommon.) vary between 80 and 90 on different sections. I think it depends on who the locals voted for.
But even if you are at 90, it's still easy to figure out time - do the calcs as for 100 and add 10%.
BTW - it isn't divided that determines whether it's 100 or less - it's controlled access (though every controlled access hwy is divided). I think the determinant in deciding between 80 and 90 is the frequency of access - more farm roads = 80, fewer farm roads = 90.
Mike
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With few exceptions (historical naming reasons, eg: the QEW), only 400-series highways are 100km/h, and 400-series is defined as "controlled access", "divided" (eg: very wide medians or concrete barriers), and likely 4 or more lanes.
90 is for important long-haul arteries out in the boonies with very little access. Parts of 17, 69, 11, much of 115 and a small bit of 6 south (I was on it last week), for example, qualify. Much of the DVP is 90km too (it'd normally qualify for 100km, but it is, I think, too congested/narrow/curvy for MTO's taste at 100km).
[I suspect 115 will get upgraded to 100km once they finally finish all the upgrades. May or may not be renamed to 4xx.]
80 or 90 km highways with "too much" access are hideously dangerous. 11 and 115 were both deathtraps until they started putting in dividers, fences and "go the other way" bridges.
90 is sufficiently rare that it's a surprise to see it on a road you've not been on for a while. 6 south surprised me ;-)
--
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Why would you make a board 5.08 x 10.16cm? You would make it 5x10.

2.5 x 15

2.5 meters

1.2x2.4, or 1.5 x 2.5
Get it?
Do you have a problem with buying a 2 liter bottle of Coke? Of course not, it's 2 liters. They don't package and label it as 2.15 quarts bottle.
In the same sense, a 10mm bolts is called a 10mm bolt. It's not a .3937" bolt.
It's just a matter of getting used to visualize a quantity or weight of something using metric measurements.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com says...

It's a standard 6mm bolt, 16mm long. Metric specs usually don't add the thread pitch unless it is a extra fine or coarse thread instead of the standard.
-- Dennis
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DT wrote:

Ayup and another good example of the bennies of the metric system. Fewer different sizes in anything, fewer wrench sizes, fewer bolt sizes, fewer thread pitches, etc. I hated it when I rotated back to the states after years overseas and had to go back to this abortion we call a 'system'.
Harry K
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I'm perfectly comfortable with either one -- but what just drives me up the wall is manufacturers who *mix* the two in the same machine. Used to have a '78 Oldsmobile that was like that. Never knew which set of wrenches to grab when I tried to do anything with it.
--
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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You can be assured th at anything made overseas is metric. 90% of the world is speaking hte same tooling lanugage, but the US persists with a strange system.
I am

Nope, with metric, yo don't need to know the thread pits except in a few unusual cases. That is mm, not cm and it is 16 mm long.

Many people feel that way but eventuall we get educated and find that our system is the strange one and metric is sooooo much easier. If the 10mm socket is too small, the 12 mm is too big, you can be sure that 12mm is the right one. No 17/32 to figure out.

When I started working at my present employer, we had some imported machines (none made in the US any more) and I had to learn metric. It takes about a day and a half and you realize it is easier to think in bars and millimeters. The medical field has used metric forever. It just makes sense, just like our money system that you like compared to shillings and quid and lira. Of course, we have to change some of our old sayings , like trying to stuff 10 kilos of shit in an 8 kilo bag.
Learn it, for it is not going away.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote: <snippage>

Now that you've cooled down, and been advised as to the relative absurdity of inches/feet/miles and all this crap ...
In the first place, instead of ballistic response, why not just ask local hdw-store clerk, or local tool dealer for the one stinking bolt. You might even have gotten explanation about the size-designation system, to help with future metric fasteners.
J
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On Mon, 10 Jul 2006 05:40:01 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Go to the hardware store or the auto parts place. They understand this commie metric shit. This is a common bolt. everyone will have it
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