Bolt Thread Size (Damn Metric Shit)

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England made the change and never looked back.
then why do english, irish, and canadian carpenters still use english tape measures?
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Because they're easier to read than chinese ones. ;-)
Many of our tape measures are both english and metric.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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wrote:

You're totally missing the point. Under the metric system, things are sold in metric units -- not in the metric equivalents of imperial units.
For example, a Canadian car has a speedometer that displays speed in kph (kilometers per hour), the speed limit signs are posted in kph, and the distances on the highway signs are in kilometers. No big deal. You see a sign that says "Toronto -- 100km", you look at your speedometer and see that you're going 80kph, and you know that you'll be there in an hour and a quarter.
Carpet and cloth are sold by the meter. Gasoline and milk are sold by the liter. Meat and nails are sold by the kilogram. Nobody bothers doing any conversions, because it isn't necessary.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

...
But I have to mentally compute (by 5/8 for convenient reasonable approximation) to find out I'm actually only about 62 miles away! :)

What are standard building dimensions as compared to US? Here, framing is 16" OC so virtually all sheathing materials are 4' x 8' which is both a convenient size for handling and works out evenly in both directions. The "tubafor" has evolved over the years from being a rough (green) sawn actual 2" x 4" through various finished sizes to the now familiar 1.5" x 3.5". Precut studs are made for base and top plates to end up w/ finished wall heights of 8' which accomodates 4' wallboard w/o trimming. I've never built anything outside the US but w/ all the trade between the two and general dimensions of buildings there certainly aren't far different than ours, I presume there's considerable overlap?
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dpb wrote:

16" translates into 400mm. Not so tough.

1200mm x 2400mm and it divides by 400mm. You couldn't tell the difference in metric vs Imperial sizes by eye.
You Yanks are just too insular. It's time to join the rest of the world.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

I just asked what actual dimensions were common... :(
...

...
Seem to be doing fine as is, but thanks for asking, anyway... :)
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Right, we're not insular, we buy everything from China. We let them figure the metric stuff and sell it back to us or ship them oil.
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dpb wrote:

I really wish that were the case. Besides, why use a second rate measurement system when we could go with a better one. inches, feet yards rods miles (two kinds) and no easy conversions between any of them, while in metric you only have to worry about meters and factor them up or down by 10's.
--
Joseph Meehan

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You forgot fathom, chains, furlong, leagues.
And to be offended that the plural for two of those is the same as the singular.
There are 11 fathom in a surveyor's chain.
See? It's simple.
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Not to mention 2.75 fathoms in a rod.

[I _think_ fathom and chain both pluralize with ".s"]
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On Tue, 11 Jul 2006 23:23:31 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

"Full fathom five my father lies, of his bones are coral made. . ." And the other one is furlong.
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu says...

Pluralization of both with the 's' is correct.
Horse races are measured in furlongs: http://www.nyra.com/chart/dailyentries.asp?track=B
--
Keith

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wrote:

Pluralization of both with the 's' is common. I suppose whether it's correct depends on whether there's any meaning for 'correct' beyond 'a lot of people do it that way'.
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Goedjn wrote:

The American Heritage Dictionary 1992 shows it as fathoms. As with all things in the English language as with the measurement system, it is open for debate. :-)
--
Joseph Meehan

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snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu says...

Cite?
--
Keith

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Don't have a cite for fathom, it's just that I grew up actually using the term, (and selling clams by the peck and bushel, too) and none of them were ever pluralized. Now that I think about, I'd have to say that they were used more like adjectives than nouns. Like "dozen". You can have dozens of doghnuts, or you can have three dozen doghnuts.
I also multiplied by hours/day twice translating furlongs per fortnight... and got a result 24 time too big.
Who was it who said "if at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then give up, there's no sense in being a damn fool about it"?
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.uri.edu says...

You can also have three bushels of corn. Or three pecks of peas.

That happens, though I'd more likely slip a 60 or two in there. ;-)

If at first you don't succeed, get a bigger hammer.
--
Keith

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Keith Williams wrote:

American Heritage Dictionary:
fathom (fth".m) n., pl. fathom or fathoms. Abbr. fath, fath., fm., fth. 1. A unit of length equal to 6 feet (1.83 meters), used principally in the measurement and specification of marine depths. --fathom tr.v. fathomed, fathoming, fathoms. 1. To determine the depth of; sound. 2. To penetrate to the meaning or nature of; comprehend. --fath"omable adj.
Note: it allows both forms with or without the "s"
--
Joseph Meehan

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sligojoe snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

I'm not disputing that "fathom" may be accepted as plural, or peck, bushel... I'm disputing that it is somehow favored over the 's' form or more accurately "whether it's correct depends on whether there's any meaning for 'correct' beyond 'a lot of people do it that way'".
-- Keith
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Goedjn wrote:

If the speed of sound is 750 miles per hour, please translate that into furlongs per fortnight.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

snipped-for-privacy@carolina.rr.com.REMOVE
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