Boiler Pressure relief valve (T&P) still leaking. Please help.

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I know this is a dumb question but I've always wondered.
Why do we call it a boiler if it doesn't boil anything?
A steam system, sure, that boils water into steam.
But a hot water "boiler" just makes water warmer, it never boils it.
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On 10/27/2014 3:33 PM, TimR wrote:

The construction of water and steam boilers is nearly identical. Some will do either with just some adjustment of the controls Calling it a boiler differentiates them from furnaces.
Boilers heat water Furnaces heat air
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On Monday, October 27, 2014 9:27:12 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Okay, but the hot water heater for your shower also heats water (why would you want to heat water if it is already hot - oh, never mind) but you don't call it a boiler.
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On 10/29/2014 9:56 AM, TimR wrote:

My hot water is heated by the boiler but I know of the appliance you are speaking of. It has either electric elements or a gas or oil burner below it. I guess you could call it a kettle?
I think this is a case of common use trumps technical terms.
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On Thursday, October 23, 2014 5:42:48 PM UTC-6, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'll admit its hard to find exact statistics on boiler explosions. Many small breeches go unreported. We hear about and see events in the industry though.
This is from the National Fire Protection Agency:
"In 2011, heating equipment was involved in an estimated 53,600 reported U.S. home structure fires, with associated losses of 400 civilian deaths, 1,520 civilian injuries, and $893 million in direct property damage."
Source: http://www.nfpa.org/research/reports-and-statistics/fire-causes/appliances-and-equipment/heating-equipment
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On Friday, October 24, 2014 10:43:11 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@centralplumbingnm.com wrote:

Which of course says nothing about the number of residential boiler explosions. Those are "fires" which could result from anything from an electric heater used near curtains, to an improperly installed fireplace, gas leaks, etc. Apparently you're a plumber. How many residences have you been called to where a boiler exploded?
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On 10/24/2014 11:01 AM, trader_4 wrote:

Must be well hidden, after all the guy said they blow and cause injuries all the time.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 10/24/2014 10:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@centralplumbingnm.com wrote:

Them boiler explosions sure hide in dark corners, you think? Don't like to be found.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Thursday, October 23, 2014 3:21:06 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@centralplumbingnm.com wrote:

e is some thing wrong with the boiler. Springs in T&P valves do not get wea k with age.

boiler diagnosed and serviced by a licensed technician.

bad, the boiler could be over fired, there could be a flow issue because of a bad re-circ pump or a restriction, zone valves could be leaking etc, etc .....

it will never match the experience of a technician that works on these eve ry day.

can kill you if you don't do things right.

as bad.
I don't see the harm in replacing the T/P valve too see what happens - the y *DO* go bad with age; I have had first hand experience with this not on a boiler but on a 18 year old water heater (that was still in fine shape, bu t I came home one day to an inch of warm water on my laundry room floor as it'd "burped" and stuck open...)
If the new one still pops off then yes, there is another problem that needs to be troubleshot and addressed.
nate
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Far fewer than the residential gas explosions. For a residential boiler explosion to occur you need several concurrent failures i.e. T&P valve, thermostat, high limit thermostat, and also need everything else tied to the system like check valves to hold long enough to get to a superheated condition. For a residential gas explosion it only takes a leak and an ignition source.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Except the majority of those are gas explosions and fires, not actual superheated water / steam boiler explosions.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Again, the vast majority of incidents are gas leak fires and explosions. Actual residential boiler explosions i.e. super heated water flashing to steam when the containment fails are quite rare.
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Yep, exactly. I always felt silly calling them a "boiler" when I got a part, but that's how it goes. The typical residential "boiler" is far different than an actual boiler. It's basically a water heater and circulator. I don't think my last hot water system ever got beyond about 180F. And pressure readings were virtually head pressure. Actual boilers for steam radiators are much more dangerous. High pressure boilers such as the ones I operated as a Boilerman in the Navy - 900F superheated steam at 1275psi - are another story entirely.
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