Bluetoth headsets and version 4.1, stereo.

I've decided to get a bluetooth earpiece so I can look cool and get girls. I'm still in the $30 dollar range until I see what sort of girls I get. And a couple things confuse me.
Someone says a big difference between bluetooth 4 and 4.1. True?
Several say stereo but show no picture of anything for the second ear!! Is there some 21st century stereo that only involves one ear?
(Amazon.com product link shortened)¢YVL6WHL0B2XF The first review is for some other product. Maybe the Name of the item is also for some other item? But many have stereo in then name.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)ZTYN6CT2XA5SV7ZDAN
There's no reason, is there, for there to be a microphone stick on both ears, so when they show left-eared and right-eared versions, I assume that is to show that by rotating parts, it will fit either ear. When it says "For both left ear and right ear" I assume that's Red Chinese for EITHER ear. If they both had mikes, you could give one of them to your friend and split the cost.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)ZTYN6CT2XA5SV7ZDAN This one, in picture 2, actually shows two of them, but the mike is on the right in both cases meaning they're both for the right ear. Is that a new kind of stereo? And why do they both need mikes?
There are lots more advertised.
I was in Microcenter and mentioned this to the clerk, and he seemed to have an answer (I think he said there were 2 parts, but I want to see this for myself). Then they were all locked up and I wasn't ready to buy, so I said good-bye. Figured collectively you all know as much as the clerk.
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On 6/6/2016 5:53 PM, Micky wrote:

What is your primary objective for use? Phone only or phone and music? If you want music, then you'll need a headset.
They say stereo because Bluetooth 4 is stereo ability, which actually began with Bluetooth 3, or maybe even 2.
The right ear left ear description means the boom mic can swivel to accommodate either ear.
There are 3 differences between 4 and 4.1
4.1 eliminates radio interference with 4g connection. 4.1 offers better and faster connectivity with the ability for the unit to turn itself off and on when needed or not for longer battery life. 4.1 improves Data transfer rate.
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wrote:

Mostly phone calls, but if I listen to music, I'm willing to do it with one ear**. I figured I could also use it for Skype on the desktop computer. Maybe I shouldn't have assumed that.
Can I, use the same bluetooth headset for the cellphone and with the desktop computer Skype? (I would turn off the desktop speakers.)
**Not the same thing but I have wireless speakers connected to my computer, and I put the left channel in the bedroom and the right channel in the kitchen. And one of my desktop speakers had been broken since August. (I should post a question about that.)

But there's no way to add as second earpiece, is there?
To use that standard, I could say that a computer is stereo, even when it has NO speakers, no headphones, no nothing. (and even then speakers could be added.)

That's what I thought.

They all sound good, but otoh... All the one-ear bluetooth headsets have on/off switches, don't they? Some of the drawings
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On 6/6/2016 11:31 PM, Micky wrote:

Assuming the desktop has Bluetooth capability...yes.

Under normal circumstances, no, but not impossible if you have a Bluetooth splitter. Without a splitter, you can add another but the smartphone will recognize it as a separate device then ask which one you want to connect with.
Such a splitter here >>>> http://www.monoprice.com/Product?c_id 8&cp_id823&cs_id82703&p_id—22&seq=1&format=1

They should. Even stereo headsets have an on off switch. I haven't seen one that doesn't.
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wrote:

Good.

Very intersting.

Very interesting. I red the manual too.

It must just be the pictures then. Thanks.
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wrote:

Maybe I should have said, The question, Why do they call it stereo? was more curiosity and not because I wanted stereo. I think they have a lot of never calling it stereo on the theory that part of the circuity is in stereo.
Also I tended to think it meant some of them came with two bluetooth earpieces, with nothing but air connecting them.
Do those things that just hook around the ear work, without falling off or being uncomfortable, on most people's ears?
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On Monday, June 6, 2016 at 10:35:22 PM UTC-5, Micky wrote:

...certainly true if *you* were wearing them!
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On Tuesday, June 7, 2016 at 9:28:12 AM UTC-4, bob_villain wrote:

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On Monday, June 6, 2016 at 5:54:11 PM UTC-4, Micky wrote:

When winter comes, you'll want one of these.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Phone, music (stereo!), warmth. :-)
I received one a gift last Christmas and I like it better than these.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Less dropout, both from phone connection and from my ears. Too bad the beanie is too warm to wear all year round.
(Yes, there is no mic boom on either one, but I have never had a complaint with others not hearing me when I use them for phone calls.)
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wrote:

Thank you both. I'm also sending this to my friend, who walks a lot and is thinking of getting bluetooth.
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2016 14:01:58 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

You know, I thought you were just funnin' me the first time. I didn't see the word bluetooth and thought it was just a hat. I have a friend who walks 5 hours a week and talks on the phone while she does it, but she goes to a mall when it's cold out.

I suggested this style to my friend, but for me, see below:

My problem is that they don't stick in my ears, regardless of the size tip used. The center of my ears must be different from others'.
But the earbuds with hooks that go around the ears are fine.
So I'm hoping the heavier one-ear bluetooth headset will be okay too.
Anyhow, I finally found one that didn't brag "stereo" when it only has one side. It says "Single Side" (Amazon.com product link shortened)
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I think what they mean is the earpeice identifies itself as a stereo device and mixes it to mono.
Normally with those kind of single-ear bluetooth devices, it'll work with the phone just fine for phone calls, but if you select the music (or podcast) player, the phone won't see the device as something usuable.
Regular bluetooth headphones or stereo earbuds work either way.
-bruce snipped-for-privacy@ripco.com
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On Thu, 9 Jun 2016 12:34:39 +0000 (UTC), Bruce Esquibel

That's a very diplomatic way to put it.

When that happens, won't the phone still ring, so after I answer and say "Wait a second" I can disconnect from the player and then use it from the phone?
Unless it's the same device, the radio in the phone. That wouldn't be a problem, right?
My friend has a Samsung Galaxy I think, rather expensive, and she listens (through a wired headset) to the radio when she walks, but if someone calls her on the phone, she can tell and maybe even when she answers the phone, the radio stops.

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On Thu, 9 Jun 2016 12:34:39 +0000 (UTC), Bruce Esquibel

I replied without thinking about this last line. So with bluetooth headPHONES or stereo earBUDS, they can be seen by both at the same time, but not single ear. I don't see why the two would be related.
Does it matter if the single ear devices call themselves stereo or not?

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I'd have to say if the device is a single peice (one ear) and says it's stereo, it should support listening to music via the player on the phone.
It's been several years since I researched this, I was looking for a one peice that could be used for playing music from an iPhone, because that is what I wanted. Mostly for driving, so I didn't have both ears covered.
Motorola made them but were priced higher than I thought was practical.
From what I remember, it has to do with the bluetooth profile they support.
It was something like using a2dp and or another one, avrcp that can use or has hsp and or hfp. The hsp is for the headset and hfp is for hands free (or it's the other way around).
What it comes down to is, the stereo headsets (that cover both ears) has both hsp and hfp, it uses one for the phone calls, the other for music.
Most single peice (one ear) is hfp only. So the phone sees it as a device it can transmit to, but the music player is looking for a hsp device and can't use it.
So what I'm saying is, if the device (one ear) says it's stereo, maybe it supports both hsp and hfp so either the phone or music player can use it.
It's confusing and I'm confused. There was something else, like either profile has 2 channels, in case of the headset, it uses one for left, one for right.
In the case of the phone, one channel is for listening, the other talking.
The main problem I ran into is most of the cheap ear peices and even the headsets don't really explain what profiles they support. Many of them said something like "supports 2 bluetooth devices" but after you read the fine print, it's one hsp device (like an iPod) and one hfp device (like a flip phone, razor or something).
Some support 2 devices, both hsp or hfp (or both).
As far as how they work in the real world, the headset I use (not a one-ear), if I'm listening to the music player and a call comes in, it pauses the player, beeps in the ear peices, tap the side to answer, do your call, when disconneted it switches back to the music player and starts where it left off.
That actually works quite well and is somewhat amazing you never need to touch the phone and switch back and forth. If the phone supports voice dialing, same thing, tap the side of the headset, when the player mutes, say "call home" and off it goes.
But making a short answer, rather than one (one ear) that says stereo, if you can dig down and see if it supports both hsp AND hfp, that is what you are really looking for (I think).
-bruce snipped-for-privacy@ripco.com
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Never mind most of the previous post, something was nagging me about being wrong with most of that I said.
It's a2dp you are looking for, if you find a one-ear bluetooth set you like, if it supports a2dp, it'll work for either music or phone calls.
If it doesn't have a2dp (usually called headset profile 1.0), those will only work with phone calls.
Simple enough now.
-bruce snipped-for-privacy@ripco.com
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On Fri, 10 Jun 2016 13:42:36 +0000 (UTC), Bruce Esquibel

I liked the previous post. It was a mental challenge. And I appreciate the detailed answer. But as perhaps you implicitly request, I won't reply to it.

Okay. I saved a bunch of urls and I'll look at them again.

Definitely simple. But I think I'll read the first one again anyhow, because even if the conclusion is wrong, it's interesting how complicated the innards are. I can see why they weren't invented in 1966 or 86, for example.

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