blown cellulose for sound proofing

I'm going to be blowing cellulose in my attic today (renting the machine).
Additionaly, I would love to add some sound-proofing to the wall between the master bedroom and bathroom (standard 2x4 sheetrock wall). Does anyone know if blowing cellulose in the wall would help in cutting down the bathroom noise?
How would I do that? I'm guessing just make some holes at the top of the wall and put the hose in there?
Andy
--
ashroyer

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That's typically how it's done - drill holes at the top and use the smaller nozzle to blow the cellulose into the wall. It'll probably help deaden the noise, but bear in mind that it does settle over time so you might notice the sound gradually getting louder again. Also, interior walls may not be sealed as tightly as exterior walls so you're going to get dust leaking into the two rooms from any holes like fixtures, outlet boxes, switch boxes, under the baseboard molding, etc. while you blow it in. Once you're done blowing it in, the dust should settle down.
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It will mitigate some of the sound (particularly high frequencies) but will not be anything like sound proofing. Low thuds will get through just fine. The density of typical insulation is insufficient to stop sound, it simply contains too much air and moves around too easily. Anything dense enough to stop sound will begin loosing insulation effectiveness. Closed cell foam would work better for sound dampning but is impractical to install unless the wall is open.
Packing insulation in the plumbing wall is not advised because if it gets wet, it will get moldy (particularly cellulose).
Sound proofing usually requires several modifications to the wall structure to be successful. Leaving that hole open at the top of the wall space will actually reduce transmission of low frequeciues by allowing the air compressed by one wall to escape rather than transmitting to the opposite wall for example.
Don't waste your time insulating an interior wall unless it is easy.
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Check out: http://www.soundproofing.org /
I suggest that you will get a lot more bang for your buck by adding a additional layer of drywall.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Wall insulation quieted our house significantly when added to outside walls. I'm sure it would add significant insulation between rooms, too. Try it first, since it would probably be much easier than adding a layer of drywall with its moulding problems, etc. --Phil
Joseph Meehan wrote:

>> >> Andy
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Phil Munro Dept of Electrical & Computer Engin
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@cc.ysu.edu Youngstown State University
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