blowing out a water line


i just installed a 1/2 inch pvc water line for a new hose outlet and would like to blow the water out for the winter months...what kind of connection should i use to hook up my air compressor to the pvc to blow the water out thanks, cj
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On Tue, 24 Aug 2010 11:54:48 -0400, cj wrote:

Where does the line run? Does it travel down where it taps into a supply? Does it have an inside shut off valve? I have a basement and a wash tub down there. If I want to drain my outdoor spigot I shut the water main off, open the outdoor spigot and open the cold water on the washtub. Gravity drains the line to the outdoor spigot as it runs out the washtub faucet. Then I would shut off the inside shut of valve to the outside spigot. That will prevent the outside spigot and the small portion of line running through the wall from refilling. Give that a try if you have a similar situation.
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If you put a small ball valve in front of it you can use a regular male compressed air end. They normally use pipe thread so it's easy to use on plumbing.
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Excellent idea. I would also add use a brass spud so rust doesn't become a problem.
Joe
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On 8/24/2010 11:54 AM, cj wrote:

I had a copper water line that ran from my crawl space to underneath a deck in the back yard in my last house. I had installed a gate valve in the crawl space that had an access port. I just took an air gun and a rag and created a seal that way. It was more than adequate to blow the line clear of water. No more split tubing to replace in the spring.
Jay
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You have failed to do your homework, Grasshoppa.
Draining water lines for winter can be as simple as opening a valve on the lowest point of the system. However, if that system was not installed with this in mind, there can be all sorts of hidden spots where water can accumulate, freeze, and cause problems in the spring. The hanging portion of kitchen hand sprayers comes to mind, I had one of those freeze. The hanging portion of a toilet feed comes to mind, I had one of those freeze.
In a perfect world, one can design the system and know 100% that just opening a valve at the lowest point, and all the plumbing being installed with gravity draining in mind will effectively work.
Enter reality.
Install what is called a Schrader valve. It is one of those things that you use to air up your tire with, although it is used in many more applications than tires. Pressure testing, winterizing lines, etc.
The main and important thing is to analyze your system for low points, and places where the water can be trapped, and either eliminate them, or make sure they are blown out and clear of water. Even if you do install a Schrader valve in your system, there may still be low points where water may accumulate and stay all winter. But not to worry. You'll find them all next spring. ;-)
HTH
Steve
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On 8/24/2010 11:54 AM, cj wrote:

I connected a small (6 or 8 inches) section of washing machine hose (with a female hose connection on it) to a female air fitting with hose clamps. I use it to connect the compressor (set at about 40 psi) to the furthest hose bib and blow them and the sprinkler systems out, all one at a time. Luckily all of those water lines are on a single system which I can isolate from the balance of the house.
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To state the obvious. To blow water out of a line, there has to be a way for the water to get out of the ohter end -- preferably a full flow, open pipe. I don't know if PVC unions are made. But, it would be wise to find a way to completely unhook the pipe from everything else. So you can get a serious flow of air through.
Second. I belive it's good to have as much air flow, in as rapid a manner as possible. So, whatever adaptor connects to the air compressor should have a full flow, quarter turn valve. Run the compressor till the switch shuts it off. Connect onto the line, open the quarter turn valve, and give it the best pressure and flow you can.
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On Aug 25, 9:58am, "Stormin Mormon"

As was already suggested, for a hose outlet there are usually better solutions than having to use an air compressor. In many cases you can use a freeze-proof sill cock so that you don't have to drain it at all. Or make sure it's pitched back into the basement and install a shut-off valve that has a built-in drain. You shut off the valve and then open the small drain cap.
If you have to blow it out, attaching a male air fitting to a ball valve makes an easy permanent attachment. Shouldn't need to disconnect anything, just open the hose bib all the way. With the compressor at about 30psi, just open the valve and let her blow!
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Andy comments: Go to an RV outlet. They sell a male hose fitting that has a Shrader valve on it. You screw it onto a female hose fitting on the water line, and hook an air compressor to the Shrader valve. It is an adapter used to blow out the water lines on large RVs but will work on any hose line..... If you keep the pressure around 30 psi or so, and slowly open one spigot after another, you will clear out all the water...
Andy in Eureka, Texas
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Andy wrote:

thanks andy, thats the fitting i'm looking for cj
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