Blow or suck to clean dryer vent

Used a leaf blower to blow about six years ago with great success. It can also suck. My wife says it's that time again but I should try sucking this time to avoid a lint mess outside. I'm afraid that sucking may collapse the vent ducting even though no cleanup would be required. Any thoughts or past experience?
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I find vacuum cleaners are ineffective compared to blowers. Please try vacuum first, and then try the blower. I bet there is plenty dust left that comes out with the blower.
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who give a ratts ass about the lint outside??? Jeeeezee
s

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Same type of person who used to have a fit when I mowed the leaves on the front lawn.
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I guess the same person who dials 911 when a dog stops and takes a dump in the yard.
BTW, since the leaf blower can also suck, wonder of OP or wifey thinks it won't suck anything but leaves. Lint would just sit there and refuse to move :-)
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Red Green wrote:

I would just get one of those little brushes used for cleaning pellet stove flues and push it through the line, or tie a string to each end and use the leaf blower to blow the string through then scrub out the lint with the brush.
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James Sweet wrote:

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Claude Hopper wrote:

Replace the whole duct? It's not uncommon for it to run through walls or crawlspaces, it may be cheap relatively speaking, but replacing it is not always trivial. I was under the impression at least that we were not simply talking about the short piece of flex connecting the dryer to the duct. The flex can be cleaned by removing it and just hosing it out outside.
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Sugar and spice and everything nice (aka my wife). Snails and puppy dog tails (aka me) couldn't care a rat's ass. Okay guys, thanks....Blow it is, maybe at night, or if I'm feeling nice, taping a fine mesh bag over the outlet should make everyone happy.
On Dec 11, 10:12pm, "Steve Barker DLT"

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

clearly and completely the reason for the request. Take said pantyhose and wrap the waistband around the dryer vent. Wrap with your favorite fastener (rubber band, duct tape, etc.). Blow out the duct. Take said pantyhose carefully to the trash and dispose of them. If there are any more old pantyhose, save them. Great for staking garden plants and not injuring the plant.
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Norminn wrote:

Excellent idea:-))
Lou
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Will do, good suggestion....Pantyhose flailing in the "breeze".

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you can wait until early spring, the lint outside will be scavanged by the little birdies who will use it to build nests for their little chicks so we can all have more little birdies.
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wrote:

They love old frayed blue tarps. Found an old birds nest last year that was like 80% blue tarp. Tree had been blown down but the nest was intact and solid.
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Red Green wrote:

Awww...
http://icanhascheezburger.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/funny-pictures-this-is-not-the-blue-bird-of-happiness.jpg
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Heck, I'll wait till the cows come home....It's the wife, she's afraid the lint may ignite as has happended in a few cases I gather.

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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It's lint in the DRYER that's the fire hazard, not lint in the exhaust lines.
Now a blocked exhaust line can cause lint to be forced into the dryer housing - assuming poor exhaust joint connections - and this loose lint can get ignited by the machine. But the worst that (usually) happens with a lot of lint in the exhaust line is excessive drying times.
To deal with the issue of fire safety, after cleaning the exhaust line, perhaps you should remove the back cover of the dryer and vacuum all the loose lint? If, however, there is no loose lint to be found in the machine's innards, then the chance of fire would seem remote indeed. (Only about ten people per year are killed by dryer fires; it's not a big deal.)
And to show her how much she is loved and valued, a smoke and/or heat detector installed near the dryer might be appropriate.
Else you could end up doing the laundry.
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She also believes that cloth or anything flammable near heating baseboards can ignite. Keep telling her that can only happen with the glowing space heater types.

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