Block External doo

Hi,
I'm thinking of blocking off my existing external back door (to extend my kitchen) and having french doors fitted in place of the large dining room window to use as the back door instead.
Are there any laws stopping me from blocking off an external door? If not, is this an expensive job? I have absolutely no idea how to do this and would have to pay a specialist to do both these jobs.
Your thoughts/ideas and general costing advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
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Building and fire codes require certain means of egress. If you put in French door in another place, you most likely satisfy the code.
Next, what do you meat by "blocking off"? If it will be completely covered inside and outside, no one will even know it is no longer an entry. Cost will vary depending on materials needed, siding, sheetrock, etc. few hundred at least, I'd guess.
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Nah, that is a common remodel on 1960s cookie cutters, to make the dining nook feel more open. A lot of them didn't even have an outside door in the kitchen, you had to go through garage and use THAT back door to get to back porch- makes cookouts a pain. May be trivial, may be expensive- all depends if you can find a french door the same width as the current window rough opening, and if there is a heat duct and/or outlet right there that needs to be moved. If the header above window has to be changed out, that means entire wall has to be opened, vs. just cutting out the wall section below the window. Plugging old door is just framing, insulating, and skinning- no need to remove that header. Hardest part will be patching in the siding or whatever on outside. On inside, a little drywall and paint will do. As to laws- codes vary, but in general, as long as the windows are big enough to climb out of, that is all they are worried about. Lots of cheap apartments only have the one real door. Of course, nobody would want to buy the place without a back door. As to costs- can't see your place from here, and don't know local freelance carpenter prices. Not counting material costs, figure 750 minimum, if all the dimensions work out right and your siding is easy to match. A day to remove window, cut wall, and install the french door, a second day to remove and plug the old door and finish up the detail trim. If they have to reframe the wall, several times that. A good carpenter should be able to look at what is there now, and tell you in five minutes if what you want is easy and cheap, hard and expensive, or more trouble than it is worth for you and him.
aem sends...
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ameijers wrote:

<snip>
The wierdest and most awkward layout I ever saw was my BIL's in Canada. Picture a 2 story house with the main living on the second floor. Bottom was more of a daylight basement layout, spare bedroom, utility, nice rec-room that was a garage at one time.
The only access to the back yard was either through the front door and around the house (on the bottom floor) or go up to the second floor, through the kitchen and down a flight of stairs.
It didn't take him long to punch a hole and put in a french door in the rec room.
Harry K
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Thanks for your reply.
No heat duct to be moved but there is a large crack in the wall right above the window to be removed. Spoke to a builder and it is structural damage, caused when double glazed window was installed.
Again any advice appreciated.
Many thanks
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Thanks for your reply.
No heat duct to be moved but there is a large crack in the wall right above the window to be removed. Spoke to a builder and it is structural damage, caused when double glazed window was installed.
Again any advice appreciated.
Many thanks
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Crack is on the inside, I assume? Again, it could be nothing, or it could be serious. Do you know if the double-glazed replacement window was same size as the original? If some hack made the hole wider by removing the short studs that hold up the header, the resulting sag would indeed likely crack the drywall. On the other hand, if somebody just pried in the wrong place while doing the install, or didn't shim out the window correctly, the crack could be strictly cosmetic- likely an old drywall seam that got overstressed. (In either case, whoever owned the house when the window was switched and crack happened, should have beat on the window company severely, and made them fix it.) If window is square, operates smoothly, and there are no cracks where wall meets ceiling, it is probably nothing. Just patch and paint when you plug the other door and repaint kitchen. They will be able to see if the header is properly supported when they pull out the window to put in the french door, and add back any supporting studs that were improperly removed. That does mean you want the carpenter to make a recon trip and pull the interior trim before you buy the door, though- the opening may need to get 3" narrower. It is possible to fake missing header supports with steel angles, but that is not the preferred solution.
aem sends...
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