Bleeding Weil McLain gas heated boiler


It suddenly got pretty darn cold in NY (finally, I suppose) and this is no time to be getting no heat. I've been poking around the net and still not found directions on how to do it as it pertains to the model we've got, a Weil McLain CGM 25A Series 9.
Here's a pic:
http://home.earthlink.net/~vdubreeze/boilerpic1.JPG
If anyone has a doc they can cut and paste for me I'd be eternally grateful.
Thanks!!
R
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What are you bleeding? My first worry would be that piece of flue pipe that looks like it has sprung open.
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That looks like a forced hot water (Hydronic) boiler. There is nothing to bleed at the boiler; generally any bleeding is done at vents on each loop or rad.
http://toad.net/~jsmeenen/hydronic.html may be of some help.
See that the pressure gauge is showing enough "height" in feet to reach the highest rad.
Jim
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Bill and Jim,
Thanks so much for the quick replies. I also realized after I posted that I didn't really mean I needed model specific directions, but what I found thusfar was all "turn it off, open the widgetpipe, do this", but not knowing about these things I need to be pointed to which one is the widget pipe.
Our apartment's heat is from water forced up through covered pipes that snake the perimeter of the rooms. I can't find any anything adjustable along those.
Bill, which is the flue pipe?
Thanks for the information.
R
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I should add that when we turn up the thermostat the boiler runs and the vent on top gets warm. In fact, sometimes you even get the telltale sound of water rushing through the pipes in the apartment. But very intermittent heat over the past week and currently none.
Thanks again for your knowledge.
R
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Stop right there!!
Call your landlord. It's *his* problem, and *his* responsibility to fix.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Why do you believe you need to bleed the boiler?
Lots of things can cause "no heat" -- but air in the boiler is pretty far down on the list. Sure looks like this boiler is in the basement, which means that most, if not all, of the radiators are higher than the boiler. That means that if there's enough air in the system to prevent water from circulating, it's in the radiators, not in the boiler.
I'm assuming this is *not* a gravity (convection) circulation system, since I think I see a circulating pump just to the right of the boiler, correct?
First things first!! -- is the circulator even running? -- does the boiler ignite? If the answer to either of these questions is 'no', fix *that* problem first, then see if you need to do anything else.
Wouldn't hurt to post a photo of the circulator(s), too.
How many circulators are there, and how many zones? Any zone valves in the system? Do you have heat *anywhere* in the house?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug,
Thanks for taking the time to look at the pic and reply.
Yes, it's a four unit rentall, with four separate boilers. The landlord has us call a specific local plumbing/heating place, but I can't get them here until next week. This cold snap coincided with one of my kids getting sick, so I wasn't liking the idea of no heat until then. I work an hour away from home with an inflexible schedule, so for emergencies I stay home and kill the day waiting for the repair person, but if there's anything not so pressing or skill - requiring that I can make right over the weekend, I try to. Obviously I wouldn't fool myself that I should do anything I shouldn't, but these little things sometimes add up to make me go online and see what I have here instead of waiting. : )
I started looking in to it because another tenant had the same issue in the fall and said the guy went into the boiler room (yes, in the basement), spent a few minutes turning things off and on and left, and then all was well. The other tenant said he had bled it, but I don't know that for sure, it just gave me a starting place to start asking questions : )
I'll need to find out more about circulators before I can answer the questions about those. Like what's a circulator?
But the boiler does ignite and warm up, and water 'seems' to start circulating in the apartment pipes.
Time to leave the message with the pro and hope it gets a little warmer in the meantime!!!
Thanks again,
R
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Look for a drain valve on the system. With a bucket under it, open the valve. You may get lots of air mixed with water, or even lots of air only at first. It may not get it all, but it may get enough air out so that some water will circulate. Thee should be a fill vale on the line feeding the boiler. Be sure it is open to allow water to flow in.
A circulator is a motor driven pump. It is in the water line of the system, hanging off the boiler, not an actual part of it. The vale I'm talking about may be right above it.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It's a pump that moves the hot water around through the pipes. Here's a pic of the ones in my basement:
http://www.milmac.com/Circulators.jpg

If the circulator has failed, you'll get some small amount of circulation just due to convection -- but not nearly enough. That might be the problem.
If the circulator is running, you should be able to hear it if you're standing right next to it. They don't make much noise, but it should be audible. And if you put your hand on it, you'll definitely feel slight vibration. If it's working.
Electrical supplies to any motor load usually have a fuse in-line somewhere. If the circulator isn't running, the problem may be as simple as a blown fuse.
You can learn a *lot* about how hydronic (hot water) heating systems work at http://www.heatinghelp.com
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Thanks to all who posted. I especially appreciate the tone of the responses. The innards of electricity and plumbing are things I know only the most basic things about, but I respect them like I respect the ocean, and I respect people who have deep understanding of them. And the ones who don't make me feel like an idiot are even better!
So I didn't do anything until the pro came today. He walked me through the bleeding process, which was good, because it was more than I had gleaned from the net. For example, he changed the pressure to 30 lbs before he started, which is something I wouldn't have known to do, and I would have waited a long time with nothing happening without it. Speedy Jim, you did say to "See that the pressure gauge is showing enough "height" in feet to reach the highest rad", but, well, I'm not too embarassed to say I stood there for a while ready to bleed it Sunday and I said "You know, I'm not really sure what that means!" : ) And then the air didn't show for a little while, and I wouldn't have been smart enough to know what to be expecting, even if I was doing the procedure properly.
And that put us in business, I'm happy to say. He thought the relays were making a bit too much noise, and pointed out another thing or two that may hinder the boiler kicking in, but since that hasn't been a problem at all we're letting that go for now.
The owner of the building aren't bad folks, but they live hours away and are the epitome of "hands off. They're a family not really in real estate that ended up with these apts, don't employ a building manager (it's just a 4 unit building and I know of only one other they have) and after years of us calling to tell them something needed fixing, and them telling us to just get it fixed, within reason, and take it off the rent, now we just do these things as they come up. Which is how we end up making some decisions. If we called them to take care of it it wouldn't get done : ) But this routine is the way they choose to do it, and I don't really mind.
Thanks again for taking the time in this!
RB
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Bleeding-Weil-McLain-gas-heated-boiler-188994-.htm Nestor Kelebay wrote:
rboy505:
If the boiler is located in your basement, then any air in your heating system will rise to the top of your heating system, and it's easier to simply have air vents at the top of your upstairs radiators to bleed off any trapped air.
On cast iron baseboard radiators, there will be one air vent at the top of each radiator. On copper tube finned radiators, there will typically be a tee instead of an elbow at the DOWN STREAM end of each radiator train. They put a tee there because they'll normally solder a 1/8" X 3/4" air vent bushing into the top arm of that tee.
Weil McLain should have a tech support phone number if you go to their web site. Just buy a long distance calling card at your local supermarket so that you can call anywhere in North America for 5 cents a minute. You should be able to resolve the problem in 100 mintues of talking time for $5.
------------------------------------- ..in solidarity with the movement for change in Iran.
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Nestor Kelebay wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/Bleeding-Weil-McLain-gas-heated-boiler-188994-.htm

Another idiot post from homeownershub. You are responding to a question that is almost 3 years old. Do you think the OP is sill around? It doesn't really matter. The OP said that the problem was solved.
You are responding to a usenet newsgroup. Maybe you could find out what usenet is. Homeowners' hub is a parasite that steals the work of others.
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