Bizarre toilet problem

Greetings all:
Well, we decided to replace the wax ring in the downstairs toilet today. Only problem was that the bolts were rusted out and we had to use the hacksaw to get them off. Time consuming, but not a big deal.
So we go upon our merry way, get the bolts off, install the new ring and put everything back together again. Looks great - except when you flush, water appears on the floor. Upon a closer inspection, we find, of all things, a HOLE in the porcelain! Quite small, can't fit my pinky into it. It's not far from the floor, and doesn't leak until you flush and the water goes down, it's not right in the bowl.
Is there anything out there that can fix such a thing, plug the hole? Or do I need a new toilet?
Thanks,
KD
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KD wrote:

Bite the bullet on this one and spring for a new toilet. You don't want a rotted out floor to come back and bite you...
Jim
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That's what I figured. Even if I were able to repair the hole, there's probably a good chance that a crack would result, and I'd have to buy a new one anyhow.
Thanks,
KD

put
water
a
far
down,
do
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If I was in the biz I would agree with replacing the toilet but a "hole?" If just a round defect hole goop comes to mind as there is no strength or heat aspects. OTOH if it is a "crack" then one could expect it to spread and replacement is clearly indicated.

put
water
a
far
down,
do
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i agree. there's a big 'hole' in the bottom and a wax ring keeps it from leaking. i suspect something like jb weld would plug a 'hole'. but if its a crack, thats another story.
randy
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KD wrote:

Depending on the location of the hole you could plug the hole instead of springing for a new toilet. The two part epoxy sticks, the kind you break off and knead with your fingers, work great for water applications such as this. They cure chemically and will harden in about 20minutes regardless of moisture or air conditions. My sump system sprung a leak in the old iron pipes that I did not want to replace, but a little bit of the steel epoxy stick has fixed the problem so far three years running. I know there are white epoxy sticks that would work for your problem, check your local home improvement center with in the adhesives section. Sure it may not be the professional or best way to do it, but it could work or least hold you off until you are ready to mess with new toilets, wax seals, sewer gas, and the the like.
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Sounds better than goop especially if the "hole is visible from above which doesn't seem to be the case.

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Hmmm. Sounds as though there are options.
The crack is not visible from above, it actually took a second flush for us to figure out where the water was coming from. I have no idea how a hole suddenly appeared there; the only thing that comes to mind is that it must have gotten a sharp poke with the hacksaw as we were chopping off the bolts.
There's no crack as far as I can see, although I do have fears that it could become a crack over time. It's just an irregularly shaped hole. Perhaps I will take a look at the epoxy route, and then just keep an eye on things. And keep my eyes peeled for a big toilet sale! :)
Thanks everyone!
KD

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If you don't mind my asking, what suddenly prompted you to "decide to replace the wax ring? Was there already a leak of some sort? Generally these last quit a long time. I'm just completing a bath remodel and I've been in the house 28 years, raised 2 daughters, two wives, and a few beer drinking buddies and the old wax ring was still as good as the new one I put in (probably better!)
Even on my most bored days "deciding to replace the wax ring" falls pretty far down the list of "Gee, I think I'll...." things!
Mark
P.S.. It sounds like your hole is in one of the cavities or channels that feed the water from the tank to the bowl. A patch will probably work, but be careful you don't restrict the flow into the bowl or it may not flush right.

to
you
find,
hole?
you
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put
Speaking of wax rings I have a toilet - I suspect - has a leak down below the wax ring. The house was built about twenty years ago and that might indicate something about the construction of the drain pipe. I'm about to get bored enough to go after in as it is in a slab and is staing the linoleum. Anyone know how much of a job this is and what I am likely to find as the problem? the reason I don't suspect the wax ring is that it was put in very carefully by a pro and with double wax rings.
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"> > If you don't mind my asking, what suddenly prompted you to "decide to

I've
beer
pretty
something
carefully
I have a similar problem. My house is about 13 years old. I've been in it just over 3 years and have what appears to be mold stains under the linoleum in my 1/2 bath downstairs. I couldn't figure out what could be the cause until I had seen a post here about a faulty wax ring. I suspect that would be one reason to "decide to replace the wax ring".
Lynn
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Back when I could hear I heard some adhesives for sheet flooring causes dark mold looking colors under the floor. I've been suspecting the shower drain for the dark colors but wife is saying, I think, maybe it's the adhesive.

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Hello:
Trust me, boredom wasn't the issue! When we purchased our house last year, we of course had a home inspector come in. During his inspection, he used a moisture detector at the base of both of our toilets. In his opinion, the moisture level present suggested the wax rings needed replacing. Being new home owners and knowing nothing about how to go about it, we put it off for awhile. We tried once a couple months ago, but couldn't remove the bolts because they were too rused. Finally got to it with my Dad's help and a hacksaw.
To our surprise, it was a remarkably easy thing to do (except for hacking off the bolts), and the wax rings are cheap. When we removed the toilet, the existing ring was crumbly and pretty much flattened. My dad's opinion was that we were overdue to change the thing. It may not even have been put in correctly in the first place, as there was no residue from it on the floor around the pipe, it was all up in the toilet.
Next step, now that we know how to do it, is the upstairs bathroom - as soon as I get that other one fixed! Thank Heaven I have two, or I'd be left without a pot to piss in so to speak. :)
KD

deal.
ring
instead
be
hold
sewer
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How are you fixed for windows?
wrote:

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In the bathroom? Not a one. This is just a half bath in my basement, no windows in it. I live in a semi; the bathroom is in the middle of the house, with one wall of the bathroom against the neighbour's.
KD

speak. :)

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Get a new toilet. Aside from saving water, you save the HOUSE. Nothing ruins a house faster than water leaks.

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