Bizarre idea (um, maybe) on driveway "patching"

My driveway was laid 30-odd years ago with, it think, redwood used as expansion joints. Needless to say, the wood has disintegrated, decomposed, and is singing in the heavenly choir. Weeds in the cracks are the result. String-trimming followed by Round Up is the usual next step. Fooey.
Ruminating on how to deal - permanently - with the ugliness, several obvious possibilities come to mind:
* Pressure-wash out the decayed elements and insert wood replacements. This will be a LOT of work inasmuch as I have about 300 feet of joints. Not to mention the not-insignificant expense.
* Obtain several rolls of press-in rubber/plastic tubing made by "Trim-A-Slab" ( think that's the name). It comes in 50' rolls (at $199.99 per roll at Ace Hardware) which is press-fitted into the gap between concrete sections. Obviously even MORE expensive than the aforementioned wood solution.
Finally, I came up with an idea which, on the surface, seems to be ideal: Roofing patch.
One could, I assume, just pour the tar-like material into the crack where it would: a) Double-sticky itself and seal to the edges of the concrete, and b) Harden sufficiently so that it would not adhere to tires or shoes or the dog.
On the experimental level, it might take several differing products to zero in on the best one for the project, but, if a tar-type sealant works, it should be cheap(er), easy to apply, and an adequate weed-preventative.
Your thoughts, results of a similar project, and warnings, would be much appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would do some googling for driveway crack repair products. I know I've seen filler products that are long, round, maybe 5/8" or so in diameter made to fill gaps like that. One type you applied it, then used a torch to melt and bind it in.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2" or 4" holes? If they used 2x's, then I'd go with your tar idea-- If 4x I'd use cold patch and a prayer.

Well, the most 'permanent' measure would be to use some cement/concrete. The right guy could make it look like he used redwood-- and you could have a cold beverage or two while he did it.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/14/2013 6:18 PM, HeyBub wrote:

They sell a bagged asphalt product that contains stone and tar with a solvent base. It is kind of a self leveling product. I have used it to fill in several different types of expansion joints. Clean out the space to allow some mass for the material - pour/sweep material into the crack. I have been able to use a tire to compact the material - a two wheel dolly with a lot of weight, a wheel barrow , or similar. Where I have used it, it has stuck well and lasted over 10 years.
--


___________________________________

Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DanG wrote:

Thanks. Sounds like what I want. But your post generates two questions:
* Who is "they"? and * What is the name of this product?
Thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, May 15, 2013 7:56:54 AM UTC-4, HeyBub wrote:

Local hardware stores, building supplies, big box stores should all have some sort of driveway crack repair product that would be similar to what was described, and/or should be perfectly suitable for this application.
Look for driveway crack repair kits with a foam backer that you pack into the crack, then cover with a tar-like substance that adheres to the asphalt and cures into a flexible yet durable substance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I've tried. At Home Depot, Lowes, and Ace. I can find nothing resembling your description.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub:
I don't know if you'll find any driveway crack repair kits with foam backer rod somehow attached to anything, but I agree with Dennis Gauge that the best solution is to use foam backer rod, and then if you want caulk over that foam backer rod.
[image:
http://www.stickyproducts.co.uk/ekmps/shops/flowstripind/images/od-support-for-mastics-free-uk-delivery-1784-p.jpg ]
Look under Caulk and Caulking Supplies in your yellow pages, and any place listed there will sell foam backer rod or know who does. You typically choose foam backer rod that's 25 to 50 percent larger in diameter than the crack you want to fill.
You push it into your crevice, and then caulk over it with any suitable caulk.
My favourite caulk is called Kop-R-Lastic, and this would be a great application for it. Kop-R-Lastic is both waterproof and highly UV resistant, sticks well to concrete and foam backer rod, and it tools very nicely with a soapy finger.
[image:
http://www.buchnermfg.com/images/sized/uimages/products/APCG2100-360x240.jpg ]
The Henry Company distributes Kop-R-Lastic in the USA. Maybe find their 1-800 phone number on their web site and see who sells it in your area. It comes in 8 different colours.
--
nestork

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Available at Home Depot and Lowes, among other places.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/15/2013 6:56 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Boy, this is rocket science, isn't it:
<http://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en&tab=iw#hl=en&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&q gged+asphalt+patch&oq=asphalt +bagge&gs_l=hp.1.1.0i22i30l4.5909.10387.0. 16550.13.11.0.2.2.0.105.878.10j1.11.0...0.0...1c.1.12.p sy-ab.ycDUPpftKrQ&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.& bvm=bv.46471029,d.dmQ&fp4ab1c82609549cf&biw13&bihH4>
--


___________________________________

Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is also a large squeeze tube of self leveling gray gunk. I see it used around buildings joining cement slabs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

If you are talking about the stuff that comes in a can, it never gets hard. You would be better off buying some tar, heating it in a pot until it melts and then pouring that in.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My asphalt expert is busy with family matters at the moment, but I think you have to heat an asphalt product to ~350F to get it to pour. -----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gpsman wrote:

Not the bagged "quick' type found at the home stores. A warm day is enough. I've used it to fill depressions in my driveway. I fill the depression with the mix until it is mounded a little higher than the surrounding asphalt, then place a piece of 3/8" plywood over it and drive my car onto the plywood so that the front wheel is sitting over the patch spot. Note: Wipe some motor or other oil on the area of the plywood that will sit on the patch so the patch doesn't stick to the plywood when you remove it.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

yoU'RE assuming this too, that it won't adhere. If it does, what a mess. Maybe for years to come.
If you are committed to this method, get a little of the stuff and fill a shallow litle wood** box with it and put it out in the hot sun all the time this summer, to see how much it does harden. Put some concrete with it
**Wood so the box doesn't fall apart and you'll have tar whereever it was.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

around here pros spread a little bit of sand over fresh crack filler so it doesnt stick to stuff, like shoes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.