Bird in Chimney

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After having them in the household since my earliest memory, I know a lot about them - more than they think I know and a lot less than I think I know.
It's quite interesting how they are exactly the same whether it's feral, domesticated or a wild big cat yet every one, like people, have individuality and temperment.
I've learned a lot about their extensive complex language of body part movements to communicate with each other and with humans. Complex in that one movement can mean several things depending on their frame of mind. And that movement+frame of mind is further complicated by what other movement(s) accompany it. You start to get into some large factorial"!" possibilities. And yet they each create new movements that they know we will lean to understand - something betweeen their language and ours.
One of the most simple and useful is looking at the animal in the eyes. This is always a challenge! unlesss...accompanied by a slow wince of the eyes then it just means I want to look at you. Works both ways. If you take note you will see they will stay relaxed. They will often wince back. Between each other, you will see the wince with a slow head turn right afterwards. I've seen it personally as well as read about it in a study. Of course I could not attest to it but the study showed this is exactly the same with big cats.
Yep, with big or little cats it's the chase. Once it's started, instinct and genetics take over. The mouse, 3/4 dead and not moving, the cat will paw and bat it till it moves somehow then beat another 1/8th dead.
A simple summary I saw was they stay with us because simply because they like us and we like them. We make life easy for them. Knowing the animal, I think the second part carries more weight. They latch on to and go with the primary human they know as "The Feeder".
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Red Green wrote:

True. It's said you train a dog with praise and correction. You train cats - to the degree they CAN be trained - with food. My granny used to say: "That looks like something the cat dragged in the dog wouldn't have!" I saw a Discovery Channel show on varieties of prey. Without question, the leader of the list, with over 10,000 distinct prey items (insects, rodents, birds, reptiles, etc.) was the domestic housecat.
My view is that you can have fun WITH a dog, but cats are fun just to watch.
Here's an example:
http://icanhascheezburger.com/
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