Bill Gates Air Conditioning Tips

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Microsoft should stick to writing crappy software:
http://moneycentral.msn.com/content/Banking/Homefinancing/P85734.asp?GT1g04
Here's my favorite energy saving tip from the article:
'Replace incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescents; they produce the same light but use a fifth the energy and heat '
I wasn't aware that light bulbs used heat to operate. But if this is true, wouldn't you want to install bulbs that use more heat in the summer, and then in the winter install bulbs that use less heat?
I wish someone would have told me that all I need to do to keep my house cool was turn on every light in the house.
Also, because the debate about shading the condensor is simply fascinating stuff, here is MS's take on it:
'Plant trees or shrubs to shade air conditioning units, but not block the airflow. A unit operating in the shade uses less electricity. '
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Andy writes:
Everything you posted above is absolutely true... Perhaps you need a bit more explanation, so here it is.
Incandenscent lights turn MOST of the electricity they use into light of a frequency that we cannot see. That light, which we call "infrared" just bounces around in a room and heats up the place. Fluorescent converts MORE of the electricity into light that our eyes respond to. Consequently,, if the goal is to "see", fluorescent is the better choice. It is also more costly to buy... so it is a tradeoff.... If you use incandescent in the winter, when you need heat, you are "helping" your furnace. If you use fluorescent in the summer when you need "cool", you are helping your air conditioner..... However, you have to weight the COST of the fluorescent lights against the SAVINGS in electricity used.
Personally, I use a LOT of incandescents inthe winter and unscrew a LOT of the bulbs in the summer...Just my method.....
Regarding shading the airconditioner......
Direct sunlight puts about 1000 watts per square meter onto the earth. That means that in the summer (or winter ), not only is the outside of your air conditioner condenser heated by the surrounding air , but it ALSO get an extra 1000 watts or so from continuous sunlite.... 1000 watts is about 5000 BTU, so it would take a 5000 watt air conditioner running full time just to get rid of the heat from direct sun radiation which shines on your outside consdenser unit.... Roughly 12 cents an hour extra, during daytime....
So, if you plant a screen , like a bush or tree, in from of the condenser, you get rid of this undesired direct heat source..... ........ if you block the air flow, tho, you are screwing things up...
The preceeding explanation is exactly accurate, although it does not include several other factors which merely confuse the issue for the novice........ If one wishes to discuss in detail some of these factors, and get into depth,..... let's do it by email......
Andy Registered PE in Texas , MS, BS, GMDSS, NCE, etc
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Andy wrote:

....
Although very poorly worded...I think that was the intended point of the post.
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No, actually it was not.
The article says that flourescent bulbs USE LESS heat then incandescent bulbs.
Which therefore means that incandescent bulbs USE MORE heat.
Which means no one needs an AC unit, all they need to do is replace all the bulbs in their house with 500 watt halogen floodlights, and soon the indoor temperature will drop, because the halogens are using up all the heat in the house.
Or at least, thats the theory Mr Gates people profess.
As far as shading the condensor, I don't know either way, but there have been fierce battles about it over in another group whose name I won't mention here.
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Matt wrote:

Yeah, we all know bulbs don't USE heat, but create heat. But for you and your hatred for everything Gates and Microsoft seem to want to make an issue of what everybody already understands.
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Andy wrote Personally, I use a LOT of incandescents inthe winter and unscrew a LOT of the bulbs in the summer...Just my method.....
======== I hope that you are kidding. Switching over to a lot of incandescents in the winter is basically the same as deciding that you are going to perform a portion of your home's heating with electrical resistance heating.
Just like many others, I don't get as concerned about leaving lights (incandescent or fluorescent) turned on in the winter as much as I do in the summer. The heat from lights in the summer is an extra burden placed upon the AC system. But I would never intentionally use lights for heat, except in an emergency. If a gas furnace fails, the house can often be kept quite comfortable by leaving on all lights, TVs, PCs, etc. Leave the furnace fan running continuously to create a few extra BTUs and to help circulate heat somewhat uniformly. Operating a couple of small electric heaters may be necessary for a reasonable comfort level. This all depends upon current outdoor temperatures.
Filling tubs and sinks with gas heated hot water adds more BTUs. This whole process is expensive, but it works in an emergency.
But wasting electricity on a routine basis to help heat the house is a very expensive source of heat.
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Gideon wrote:

I wish you people would get with the program. Incandescent lights USE heat. Bill Gates sez so.
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And it's true. They use heat to make the filament glow.
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You are a pretty dim bulb!
rusty redcloud
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Yes, that way I use less electricity!
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You also produce a lot more heat than light.
rusty redcloud
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Matt wrote:

You can't be serious are you? Heat is the by-product of the light bulb, fluorescents give off less heat. As for giving off the same amount of light. I don't like them at all, I bought a bunch for my house, and the strongest one I found barely lit my laundry room.
Glenn
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They do a fabulous job of drawing even MORE bugs to my porch than an incandescent bulb. Not scientifically tested, but it seems that way.
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Hmmm....
All those little insect wings flapping may reduce the temp.....
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Matt wrote:

No, actually they'll raise it (slightly) by the work input...
Always will remember my first reaction to learning how reactor coolant was heated to hot standy...reactor coolant pump impeller work was sufficient to raise water temp to 550 F at 2200 psi w/ flow of 131E6 lb/hr...my first thought was "Wow!!"
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Actually, I've never quite understood why they shouldn't be sheltered from the sun, but I only wonder about it and never do anything to find out why. Anyone know why?
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block
'
sheltered from

out why.

I'd hazard a guess and say the same reason your car sheet metal gets hotter when parked in the sun rather than shade-radiant heat. Compressor shell gets hotter, condenser fins exposed to radiant heat.. Translates to higher head pressures..
But without going through a lot a machinations, not easy to prove analytically...
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Rick wrote:

Also, under tree canopy air temps can be as much as 10-15F cooler than open air, thus improving heat exchange efficiency....
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I am not a A/C guy but it happened at work and this is the expalantion they gave us: THere is a fixed temperature difference between the outside coils and the inside coils. As the outside coils get hotter so do the inside coils but they always maintain the same delta temperature. To cool the inside air, the inside coils have to be cooler than the inside air. IF the outside coils are so hot that the inside coils are only at 70 degrees than the cooling effect for the inside air will be minimal (less effiecient). At work they said the rooftop coils were sitting at 150 degrees. Hence the lack of cooling. Not sure I believe them. SO if you can keep the outside coils cooler, the inside coils will be cooler and you will consume less electricity.

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wrote:

Many thousands of years ago, I worked at a Steakhouse. The rooftop airconditioner was inadequate and old. During very hot weather, some of us would take turns up on the roof, squirting the coils with a garden hose. It made a BIG difference in the ability of the unit to cool the restaurant.
rusty redcloud.

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