Better ideas for fixing leak right at the pool pump inlet (no room!)

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On Sat, 26 May 2012 12:49:27 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

Wow. That looks like nice stuff.
I wonder if it will repair the zillions of leaks that I get in my lousy Fafco solar heating panels?

Generally I plug the holes with rubber plugs - but this bonduit seems like better stuff than what I'm using for the incessant leaks in the solar heating panels.
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I'd just use the PVC glue on it again. Also a drip every 5 secs on outdoor pool eqpt is probably acceptable.
For the discussion about plugging the various fittings in the pool, if you need to do that the pool shops have plugs designed for that. They are like rubber stoppers with a bolt and wingnut in the center. You shove it in, then tighten the wingnut to expand it.
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wrote:

Yup... It is always good to have some of those around for your pool, even if you NEVER have to use them, cheap insurance compared to the cost of refilling thousands of gallons of pool water...
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 08:50:44 -0700, Evan wrote:

I understand what you're saying now that I see how I can plug the five drains using these cheap rubber stoppers with wing nuts on top.
Since the solar panels are fifteen feet below the pool, and since the pool equipment is five feet below the pool, any major leak will essentially empty the pool.
If I'm home, and if I have these five rubber stoppers, I can unscrew the cover plates on the five drains and then plug up the pipe inside with these plugs.
Thanks for the wonderful idea and advice!
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 05:56:19 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I was wondering what an 'acceptable' leak was.
Yesterday, it was spewing out of the leak at the rate of a gallon every ten minutes or so (pure guess) ... but it was only dripping after the blue PVC suggestion (thanks whoever suggested that!).
Interestingly, this 4-foot-long spray is what greeted me in the morning:

The pressure is very high with five feet of water above the pool forcing against all the intakes when the equipment is off all night. So it must have turned the drip after yesterday's repair into this stream of water shooting out a few feet to the side.
I plugged this stream using the same technique as yesterday - so we'll see if it lasts.
I think I'll use the stuff mentioned already to cover the whole connection in goop, to protect it from elements, pressure, and vibration over time.
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 10:13:17 -0700, Oren wrote:

I second that motion!
I am indebted to Bob F. for suggesting this novel method of sucking in the thin PVC glue into the fitting while the pump was running.
It worked like a charm!
STEP 0: I ran the pumps for a few hours during the day which allowed the water on the outside to dry.
STEP 1: Here I am applying the blue PVC glue to be sucked in with the pump running:

STEP 2: Shutting off the pump, 'most' of the leak stopped:

STEP 3: In the morning, this is what I found with the pumps off:

STEP 4: So I added MORE blue PVC glue! :)
Now if only Bob F. has just as ingenious idea for plugging numerous leaks in the lousy Fafco solar pool heating panels!

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On Sat, 26 May 2012 21:18:51 -0700, Oren wrote:

Again, you're astute as you have ascertained something (a mistake I made prior to this post) that I didn't mention - but which you noticed - which is that the leak has been happening for a long time.

In fact, when I bought the house, the pumps were leaking. I just didn't know from WHERE they were leaking (they were wet all over!).
In addition, the two pumps that were leaking most had a whitish clay- looking grout or 'caulking' all around the two leaking fittings at exactly the spot where I put the blue PVC glue.

It must have been that this tan grout or caulking or whatever paste, was put there to stop the leak. The interesting thing is you never saw this paste because I chipped it away, not knowing WHAT it was when I was cleaning up the pool when it was empty.
Of course, with the pool empty, nothing happened when I chipped away that tan hard ring of grout around the fitting. But when I refilled the pool, then I had this huge leak.
What amazes me is you noticed all that without me ever once mentioning that I had removed this clayish grout which, in pure hindsight, I can assume the previous owner added to seal the very leaks that you guys helped me seal just now.
Interestingly, when I asked the original question for this thread, I suspected the answer would be whatever that clay-like grout material was. But the answer turned out to be blue PVC cement!
What a weird twist of fate!
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 22:21:01 -0700, Bob F wrote:

Googling for "fafco repair kit instructions" I find these instructions: https://shop.solardirect.com/pdf/pool-heaters/solar-pool-heaters / collectors/fafco/fafco-kit-instructions.pdf
Essentially, the manufacturer sells (only through distributors) an expensive mechanical repair 'kit' which consists of three components: a) A curved knive to slit open the panel's many tubes b) A dozen rubber cones to shove into the now-wide-open panel tube c) A thin allen wrench to use to shove the plug into the hole you cut with the knife
I have the repair kit. It's a pain to use - but it works (eventually).
What I really need is a second source for the little conical plugs: http://www.ehow.com/how_6128236_repair-swimming-pool-solar-panels.html
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On Sun, 27 May 2012 11:52:14 -0700, Bob F wrote:

Yeah. One by one, you disable each of the dozens of pipes which leak every year. You first gouge out a few inches, and then put two rubber plugs in the top, and two in the bottom using this $40 repair kit from Fafco:


Today I patched about a dozen leaks and then, after it sun dried, I added putty epoxy as shown in this picture below. I hope the disable of the pipe holds. If not, I'll look to the AquaSeal since I presume it can seal while wet (which is a major problem with this repair).


Hmmm... I 'like' this idea! The hot glue might push itself up the hole when I disable the tube by gouging it out and trying to plug it with the hot glue from the pressure of the water from the pump.
BTW, I learned my lesson today to use whiteout to mark the holes when they are wet - and then to let them sun dry to repair them with the glue/ epoxy.
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