Best Way to Secure Metal to Brick?


Hello,
I have a piece of metal that I would like to secure to my brick basement wall. I'm wondering what is the best way? Are there some sort of screws available? Do you need a special drill? What about types of glue such as super glue or epoxy?
Thanks Sam
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On Sat, 6 Sep 2008 08:38:25 -0700 (PDT), samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

http://tapcon.com /
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On Sat, 6 Sep 2008 08:38:25 -0700 (PDT), samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

The blue cement screws require a certain size drill. I use Liquid Nails in addition to the screws. The blue screws are about $1 each. Exactly what you need depends on the application, but forget about the super glue.
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samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Blue tapcon screws come with their own cement/brick drill of the correct size. It's easy, drill or hammerdrill the hole, then screw what you want to the wall.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

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On Sep 6, 11:38 am, samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

What size metal, is the metal smooth or textured? What kind of metal. how much total weight? Is this below grade? Brick does not do well below grade, it generally likes to be dry, but there are many kinds of brick. What kind of brick do you have, how old and what is the current condition?
What will work or will work best depends on the above and maybe a few others.
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On Sep 6, 10:38 am, samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Easiest and cheapest is to drill 1//2" holes (or whatever you prefer) and use any 2 part epoxy to anchor a common dowel in the hole. No danger of splitting or cracking bricks from expanding type fasteners. The dowel is very well suited to common wood screws, but some hardwood dowels should be pre drilled for old soft brick as a matter of respect for the material. Used this technique for years for hand railings, mounting electric service panels and boxes, hanging decorative shutters and planters, house numbers, etc.
Joe
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the epoxy anchors are one of the better ideas, as these will not have be torqued down creating wavy sheet metal. You wouldnt need half inch though. maybe quarter inch would work well.
Phil scott
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Never used on, but I've seen special nail guns that shoot through steel and into concrete. Almost impossible to bull the nail out. Fast and strong, that's the tool to use if you have a big project.
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On Sep 6, 8:38 am, samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

others have posted the usual means...varous forms of anchors..and thats fine.
However if there is no weight on the metal, and its a broad area ... many adhesives will work, and you will end up with a utterly flat piece no deflections in the metal from the anchors, holes or bolt heads.
If I were doing it I might go that route...if you then sink one anchor into the sheet, near the middle, it would hold any weight, leaving the adhesive largely unstressed.
My favorite adhesives advertises 'dries flexible'...and will be rated for the combination of metal and brick.. many are... including some varieties of liquid nails, goop, and a special clear lexan type adhesive, looks like silicon seal but is a lot stronger. comes in a clear tube..costs about 50% more.
If you use glue find a way to brace the metal flat against the brick during the dry time...for best results do not brace it with points but behind a flat sheet of plywood etc. so that when you are done the steel will reflect light perfectly flat... that will be a nice\\ job... waivy wont be nearly as slick
Phil scott
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A piece of metal can range from the foil your wife used to line the meatloaf pan to the hood from your old '55 Chevy. Each has different characteristics and I'd use different methods. It that solid red brick? Block? Painted? Interior? Exterior?
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