Best way to repair notched joist (with pic)

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But in this case would it matter? Serious question, I'm no structural engineer.
With a 2 x 8 sistered across the notch, extending let's say 2 feet on each side, and then glued and lagged in, let's say, 4 (6?) places on both sides of the notch wouldn't that be more than enough to fix the current problem?
Would bolts really add anything worth considering or would they amount to overkill?
Of course, that's not to say that bolts wouldn't actually be easier to install.
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Whatever you do will be better than what you have. Screws should be ok. Put constrcution adhesive between the boards.
Hank
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That sure is a scary picture. Just to make you think.
How long has it been that way? What problems has it caused? For what reason was it cut?
Do you really need to do anything?
Colbyt
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At least 30 years.

None that I'm aware of

It was notched for a 2" PVC pipe that went outside to the sprinkler system. Below the picture used to be a pump with a pipe going in the ground.

I don't know. I figured now I had the walls opened, I would try to at least do something.
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wrote:

You say you have the walls opened. If this is in a wall, simply support it on both sides with studs.
If it hasn't gone anywhere in 30 years, it's unlikely to now. However, I'd do something about it too.
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For Mike,
After 30 years it has done all it is likely to do, but I agree with both you, I would scab it on each side if possible extending 18-24" past the notch. Thereafter I would forget about it.
--
Colbyt
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On 12/31/2010 9:20 AM, Colbyt wrote:

That close to center beam, and to the fully-supported joist on outside wall, unlikely to fail catastrophically. But just on general principles, I'd sister it anyway. From over the beam to maybe 18-24 inches past the notch. A couple 16s to baste it in place, then some staggered carriage bolts on each end. If that isn't possible, then a 2x4 or steel strap lagged into the bottom of the joist to take the stress off of the cut section. Unless a 4-foot level on the floor upstairs shows any sag, I wouldn't even bother to jack it. Hard to say what it was for, without inspecting the space for other clues, like on the outside wall. Maybe a long-gone oil fill line?
I've seen worse, in more critical locations. Held fine for years, then one day somebody walks through carrying a piano, and 'crack'. Carpenters have long been of the opinion that plumbers and electricians should be prohibited by law from owning sawzalls.
--
aem sends...

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You have far too many different colored objects in that area for any repair of the joist to be effective.
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By this, do you mean that the gray object slightly closer to the camera than the notched beam is a structural steel beam? If it's a full length beam that the flooring above sits on, then I'm not sure the wood beam is worth worrying about. I would ask for other opinions after answering that question though. I'm no engineer.
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Yes that is a steel beam spanning the center of the basement with joists running perpendicular.
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I'm confused.
Is the "beam" you are referring to in the lower left of the picture right above the yellow romex that loops to bottom of the picture?
If so, why does it look like wood? It looks like it's a piece of wood with possibly a steel plate attached to the face of it.
Not that that has anything to do with the repair of the joist. It's just that it doesn't look like a "beam", at least not to me.
Am I missing something?
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There is a 2X4 resting flat on top of the I-beam that runs the whole length.
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Oh...I see it now. It's an I-beam and that bundle of wires runs under the top horizontal.
I didn't notice the rust on the vertical part until just now.
Thanks!
I wonder why they used a 2 x 4 on top of it. Just seems like something that could crush of a joist was positioned on a soft spot. In my house they set the ends of the beam in a bed of concrete to get it to a height where the joists rest right on the beam.
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I should have been more clear. I meant the gray object at the top of the photo that seems to be running parallel to the notched beam.
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HVAC duct running inside the joists
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One more thing.....
If you can sandwich a piece of plywood ( the thicker the better, the longer the better) between the 2 boards with adhesive, that will fix your problem for sure.
Hank
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When you say adhesive, is liquid nails good?
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Any polyurethane construction adhesive would do.
R
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A two part epoxy is even better. Sister the joist on both sides with 3/4" plywood of substantial length and the lost strength should be totally recovered.
Joe
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Yes, that'll work. Don't be shy with it.
Hank
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