Best way to paint edges in a room?

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I'm painting rooms in my house. There are two ways I tried painting the edges along the wall. First I tried masking and just using that. Next I bought a long plastic edge and inserted that at a 45 degree angle to the wall and painted against that (without masking). While they both turned out somewhat OK, neither is great. Is there a secret to this?
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Experience (practice) and skill, said my father-in-law (after 40 years in the painting trade.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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If you can figure it out, then you are well on your way to making good money painting. I think it just takes lots of practice and a steady hand. The variations in the joint will make the lines look off ( if you tape or use the edger), and so, you have to cheat here and there to make the line come out looking straight
Dave
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Scott Simpson wrote:

Every pro I have even seen, that did good work, used the same thing, freehand. With practice they can do it better and faster than using either of those ideas.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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On Mon, 5 Feb 2007 14:42:34 -0500, "Joseph Meehan"

The more I practice freehand; the more confident I get. A quality brush, well loaded with paint and longer strokes.
Until I was around a "craftsman" I never knew I did not know how to properly clean a paint brush. After he showed me, plenty of brushes have been saved.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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I try to be diligent but somehow my brushes still gunk up...
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Well, he didn't teach me everything..
Use a wire brush (stainless steel /paint dept), water or solvent as necessary.. Stroke in the direction of the bristles away from the handle. In the palm of your hand; under water you can clean well with plenty of rinse (no paint in final rinse). Don't dabble the bristles of the brush. Where the bristles, handle and metal (Purdy) meet - make certain it is rinsed.
Eventually I'll toss a brush as they get gunked up.
Sorry if I can't explain this perfectly..... -- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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You can buy a paint brush comb in Home Depot. It gets more paint out of the brush. I have even saved some old dried up brushes with them. For latex paint rinse with warm water and soap. http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId8842-159-1831 Dave

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Can't find a wire brush, a fork will do the job.
Get out as much paint as you can before rinsing in solvent. Lay the brush down on a stack of newspapers and *gently* push out any remaining paint with a putty knife. You'll be amazed how much paint you can squeeze out of a "dry" brush.
Your brushes will last longer in near pristine shape and be easier to clean if you don't dip more than halfway to the ferrule.
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One trick when finished cleaning them is to work some dish detergent into the brush well and then form it and let it dry. Even is not cleaned perfectly if the soap is worked in good it will come back to life when you go to use it. Another thing, a while back when I was having soem cornea trouble I was having trouble cutting in and needed to find a way to get by. One thing I found at the time was something called shurline. It worked very well and got me by. Since I do a lot of painting cuting in is not a problem for me as long as I have a good brush. Good luck.
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On Feb 6, 6:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Liquid Tide (or store brand) cleans out fresh latex better than soap when washing up.
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blueman wrote:

Dip in solvent and wring out before first paint, water for latex, ms for oil paint. Dip brush only about 1/3 of bristle. Don't load the brush. If you take a break until next day, wrap brush in foil and put in freezer. When finished, soak in solvent until it is clear, working the solvent up into the top of the bristles and spreading them to make sure paint is all gone. Drain it and then load it with dish detergent. work up into the top of the bristles, rinse well with hot water, shake it out and store hanging. Don't stand it on bristles at any time. During painting, for brief breaks, use coffee can with solvent - cut an "X" in the lid to stick the handle through so it hangs in the solvent and doesn't stand on the bristles.
buy good brushes and clean them well. You can re-use ms if you let most of the paint settle and pour off the rest to use for cleaning.
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My painter suggested this, and it worked well (HE doesn't need to do it, but suggested it'd help me): Take a utility knife and run it between the ceiling and the wall, making a very slight cut (more like a scratch almost). This prevents paint from bleeding onto the surface you're not painting. I still taped though, but overall this looks MUCH better than just taping. Very clean lines, and you can't see where the "cut" is, as it's absolutely minimal. KB
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Good quality masking tape pressed firmly against the wall (so the paint doesn't seep underneath). Then remove BEFORE it dries so you don't pull the paint "skin" off the wall. If the wall requires 2 coats, repeat. Possibly alot of work but its worth it.
--Jeff
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On Mon, 05 Feb 2007 10:05:06 -0800, Scott Simpson

Quarter round molding.
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Sometimes it is easiest to paint the ceiling first, not worrying much about the edge. Then, with good light, the right ladder, and a good 1-1/2" sash brush, cut the wall into the ceiling freehand. Lay off the coffee and work while you are not tired or cranky. I like soft background music.
Takes practice, to get a really good job. There is an art to getting just the right amount of paint on the brush and how to exactly apply the brush and how to avoid going back over the cut line.
With water-base paint, have that we rag handy so you can wipe it off and start over when necessary.
By the way, some "pros" do a crappy job of cutting in.
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Buy a good brush and do it freehand, it is worth the $12. I personally like an 2.5" angled Purdy brush. The other option is a painting pad. It will do a nice job but I find that I get paint in the little rollers and spend more time cleaning them than painting. Dave
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My favorite also. At that cost, they are thoroughly cleaned and properly stored.

I try and stroke the pad in one direction. When I place the pad on the wall I stay just shy of the ceiling and slightly push the pad/paint up to the line. As I finish the stroke with the pad I slightly pull down and away from the ceiling. It seems to help with the dirty rollers.
-- Oren
"Well, it doesn't happen all the time, but when it happens, it happens constantly."
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A decent quality brush and practice. I quit masking some time ago and learned to do it freehand with better results than I ever got with masking. Also, freehand is less time consuming. The amount of paint on the brush makes a big difference. You don't want much paint on the brush at all and you need to push the brush against the wall a bit until the bristles flare up to the cut-in point. Then with a slow and steady hand guide the brush along your cut-in. Reload the brush as needed. Just remember you don't want much paint on the brush.
-Felder
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Felder has hit on the one thing that I've observed in watching others aint - useing too much paint. Go easy when dipping the brush, and put the full bristles on the wall an inch or two below the ceiling (same for cutting in around woodwork) and then work the paint towards the finish point.
The next thing tends to be trying to 'work the paint' too much. Once it's on the wall, leave it alone until it dries. The more you brush it around the more you are likely to mess things up, whether you have masked it off, are using a straight-edge, or going freehand.
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