Best Way to Get Stuck Hose off Spigot?

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I ordered a new clothes washer and it came today. The delivery guys couldn't get the cold water hose off the spigot... they probably didn't try too hard for fear of breaking the spigot. What is the best way to get it off? I was thinking penetrating oil (hard angle to apply though), then run a gallon or two into a bucket then apply to the washer. Any better ideas or tips?
The old hose (rubber) is 10 years old and I bought new metal ones to replace them, so now I've got a new one on hot and the old one on cold.
Thanks!
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Way I used to do it (I used to run into this regularly when I was an appliance tech) was to CAREFULLY hacksaw several cuts around the connector and GENTLY pry the connector away from the spigot piece by piece. You need to cut into the connector just enough to weaken it so that it can be peeled away from the spigot. It does work if you're careful, trust me.
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Well what I would do is spray it down w/W-D 40 then Try a pipe wrench or a pair of channel locks With another pipe wrench to support the spigot. No Joy, take a *little* heat to it(don't want to melt solder if present) Still no luck, if you can get to it, try to hack saw 3/4 of the way through the hose connection, then hit with a cold chisel and hammer. Try not to bugger up the threads on the spigot or where the washer contacts the spigot. But channel locks and/or a little heat should do it. tony

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WD-40 and a strap-wrench should do the job.
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In alt.home.repair

There is no way a strap wrench is going to handle a stuck spigot. We're talking channel locks or vice grips. Beat on it a little too to loosen things up first.
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Bruce wrote:

But back up the side opposite the one you're beating on by pushing something hard and heavy against it. A brick or even weight lifter's 10 pound dumbell would be about right.
Without a backup there's probably too much flex in the piping to let the beating do much good.
Good luck,
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."
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I've found Channelock pliers helpful.
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Christopher A. Young
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Probably not something you want to hear but I had the same issue when I replaced my washer and I had to cut the spigot off and solder on a new one. I absolutely could NOT get the hose off. I suppose that the corrosion bonded the two metals together.
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On Fri, 02 Jan 2004 13:50:17 -0600, Casey Stamper

I agree. If a pipe wrench wont take it off, or risks busting pipes, just replace the spigot. If you got steel pipe, you can try to saw off the rubber part of the hose and heat the connector with a torch. But too much heat will damage the spigot....
There were other good ideas posted on here, but many are time consuming, and a new spigot should be under $5.
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Wet it with Marvel Mystery Oil (whatever), let is sit for a while, then BIG channel locks, ones that will close over the hose end and you can then grip the two handles. Use another wrench (monkey, channellock, vise grips) holding the opposite way to support the spigot. Another trick is to try to tighten it first, sometimes this is enough to break it free. Make sure you support the spigot going the opposite way of the loosening hose.
Dave

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Good point/idea,. Tony
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Anthony Diodati wrote:

If that doesn't work, and if you can get a hacksaw blade in there, cut one of the flats of the nut almost all the way through so it will split and peel loose when you put a wrench to it.
Bob
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I am yet to see any nut, bolt, screw or anything else with threads that does not come loose with WD40, Vise grips and, if necessary, a propane torch. ds

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Did you Get it Off? Tony D.

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I haven't tried yet because I'm still debating whether to try it or just schedule a plumber. Someone mentioned a new spigot is $5, but what should I expect a plumber to charge to do it?
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Nothing less than $65. Most have a one hour minimum even though this job would take about 5 minutes.

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On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 03:52:45 GMT, "K. Collier"

Yeah, for me to hire a plumber to replace an outside spigot would cost $150 because code here requires those frost-free spigots, which are a lot more than $5. I'm going to do this one myself in the spring by cutting the 1/2" copper pipe in the basement, removing the section that runs out to the spigot, and buying a new section with collar and new spigot and just try to torch the whole thing together. I already have a shutoff on this pipe, so I see no reason to buy that expensive frost-free sillcock given that I'm mindful enough of my house to shut off the water to the outside when the temps drop. Doing this repair the old way may not be code, but it'll save me more than $100.
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For less (probably less than half!) than what a plumber will charge, you can buy yourself a brand new Dremel tool kit with accessories and a package of "cut-off" wheels. You'll be done removing the stuck part in less than 5 minutes. You will then own a wonderful tool that you can use for all sorts of things.
BB
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Actually I've got a Dremel kit... hadn't thought about that one, may be something to try should WD-40 and a plumber's wrench fail.
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Personally, I'd forget the alternatives and go straight to the dremel with a cutoff wheel.
BB
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