Best way to dig a 40' long trench to bury wires

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wrote:

A call to the Digger's Hotline might be a good first step. There are at least two benefits to using a shovel. Most of us could use the exercise. Plus, a penny saved is a penny earned. A guy might be paying himself good money by not renting a machine to do the work.
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On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 11:39:09 -0500, "Dean Hoffman"

The "dig line" (the name is different from place to place) is pretty good at finding buried utilities in the right of way and they usually can find the service from the street to the house but they are not usually going to find wires and pipes on your property that were not installed by the utility. The real reason you call is to avoid being charged if you do hit a utility ... and I see it all the time, even after they mark everything they find.
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On 06/28/2015 11:39 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
[snip]

and a shovel is less likely to break a buried gas line.
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Yes, thanks for reminding me. Good idea.

The last time I used my post-hole digger I remember saying to myself "this is a younger man's work!" In this clay/rock hard-packed soil it takes a long, long time to dig out very little material. Or run into a boulder as big as a barrel. I think this long a dig will take a gizmo or a julio.
TKS
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On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 20:17:53 -0400, "Texas Kingsnake"

If you are really thinking about hiring an electrician, ask him. I am sure he has dug some trenches around there and knows what you are up against. He may even have a recommendation on a guy to dig it or just do the subcontracting himself, cheaper than you can get a guy. You will get a feel for what you are up against pretty quick when you start talking to them,.
On the "interference" thing, if you space the wires an inch or 2 apart in the trench, it won't be an issue at all.. If you are worried, twist the UF a little but usually that happens when you pull it out of the box. In real life, coax is pretty noise resistant. Same with Cat-5/6.
Yes "flooded" phone wire is the stuff with silicone grease in it. That is the gold standard for underground wire but anything rated "direct burial" should work.
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With regard to interference into the TV line from the 60 Hz 120V line, yes, that can happen. The 12V circuit mentioned for lighting is, unfortunately , 12V, 60 Hertz so there is still potential for interference, but it should be only 10% of the possibility of interference using 120V.
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On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 21:01:51 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net"
The 12 volt circuit is GENERALLY AC but there is nothing saying it cannot be DC, and 12 volt sis a lot less than 10% as likely to cause interference.
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A steel wire called an electricians snake is used to pull wires through pipes.
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On Sunday, June 28, 2015 at 9:45:54 AM UTC-5, Texas Kingsnake wrote:

24" unless it is GFCI protected, then you can go 12". If you put it in a conduit you can go 18".
http://www.xwalk.com/images/Table_300.5-Min_Cover_Reqts.pdf
http://www.iwireelectricservice.com/
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