Best way to cut off bottom of studs?

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Wrap the walls with roofing felt (tar paper) or building wrap, then add siding or a layer of thin rough sawn plywood to cover it all. You can use "Z" flashing if you can't find sheets tall enough to reach from top to bottom.
Another option... Unscrew the plywood from the studs, add 3/4" furring strips to the studs, then reattach the plywood with longer screws. Brace the building and you can do one or two sheets at a time. This would let you extend the plywood over the floor structure to keep out leaks, then add "Z" flashing at the top and add a strip of plywood to make up the difference.

If there's only 12 screws in each sheet, it almost sounds easier to dismantle the shed for the supplies, then rebuild it the way it should have been. Assuming the rest of the shed has so few fasteners, it should come apart with minimal damage to the materials.
Anthony
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On Jul 19, 4:40 am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

How big is it? If not huge, brace as needed and cut the needed 1-1/2" off of the bottom with a sawzall and tap the 2x4 bottom plate in place. You will have to be careful not to get into the sheeting with the saw; and you might have to splinter some of the bottom chunks out. The saw should also take care of any nails sticking up from below. Toe-"nail" with 2-1/2" or 3" screws. Weird, yes but is should work.
Big shed, bigger problem, but it sounds like you have already moved it.
RonB
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I just went out and measured my Milwaukee saws-all. As you indicate it will be difficult but I think mine would allow me to do the above with a 2"x4" guide block for the blade.
RonB
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I'd say forget the bottom plate. To increase the integrity, simply panel the inside with oodles of screws in 1/4" up paneling. Even cheaper is to use 1x4s for diagonal bracing.
Make sure the structure is straight and plumb before attaching the panels, 'cause it ain't gonna move in any direction after you do.
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It sounds like a rather small shed, can you lay it on it's side and add your plate beneath the plywood and nail through it into the studs.
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The sheathing then won't cover the plate.
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LOL... Add a decorative trim board at the bottom of the sheathing...
It is not rocket science... Even though someone who would try and cut out the bottoms of studs in a shed to install a plate is trying to make it such...
Adding the plate under the plywood is the best option in this case... Since there is no structure to support the roof temporarily as the wall studs are cut... You would have a difficult time getting the plate in under the studs after you cut them...
Best option is to combine several of the solutions offered here:
Install plate under plywood, nailing into the studs with long enough nails to grab... The supplement this with the blocking between the studs which are screwed into the plate underneath the floor...
~~ Evan
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On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 13:34:24 -0700 (PDT), Evan

Use deck screws instead of nails
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On Jul 20, 9:27 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Umm... NO... Deck screws are NOT structural... In actual construction they are ONLY used to attach the decking boards down to the joists... You CAN NOT and should not be using decking screws to attach the framing elements to each other... That is what lag bolts and carriage bolts are for... Strong metal with decent thickness is required when you are going to be relying on the connected pieces to support weight and deal with any sort of forces like wind or snow loads...
Use nails to attach the plate to the studs, they are thicker and stronger than decking screws... If you were going to add auxiliary blocking between the studs after installing a plate underneath the studs, it would be ok to attach those to the plate using screws because the blocking is not meant to be structural at that point, it is being used to allow for the ease of attachment for some sort of interior wall sheathing...
~~ Evan
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On Thu, 22 Jul 2010 05:11:54 -0700 (PDT), Evan

That depends an awfull lot on what nails, and what screws, doesn't it?????

And can also be very "structural" if properly installed.

4 deck screws in that application is stronger than 2 nails - likely stronger than 3, and won't pull loose nearly as easily. A number 10 deck screw is a pretty hefty screw for the application. If you are not using PT wood, standard "construction screws" will also work, but coated deck screws drive more easily, and are less likely to corrode off.
Screws will produce a more rigid and longer lasting assembly than nails because they are much less likely to work out, or loosesn. (which is why they are used in cabinetry over nails). They also have the advantage of being easily removed for "rework" without totally destroying the framework as is often required with ardox, spiral, or ring-shanked nails (which hold better than common nails, but not as well as screws)
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...which will do a fine job of trapping water. Next week: rot.

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Not if you install the trim board correctly... And no one said the trim board had to be made of wood, a lot of contractors are using PVC for exterior trim these days...
~~ Evan
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It doesn't matter if they're stainless steel if they let water channel into the framing.
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Maybe I'm missing something, but it sounds like it would be a lot easier to cut 2x4 blocking to lay between the studs. You could screw one block to the floor, then drive a couple of screws through the stud into the end of the blocking. Add the blocking in the next stud bay, and continue. You'll end up with the same 2x support along the bottom of the wall, with a lot less work and potential damage to the existing structure. Nail the siding into that bottom row of blocking to tie it all together even more. You now have a bottom plate you can attach drywall or other wall covering if desired.
Good luck!
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote:

I must be missing something too. Why does the OP WANT a base plate?
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wrote:

Because the guy who built it just stood the studs in the floor and put 2 inch drywall screws into the plywood floor. Mind you, only ONE screw in each stud, and it only penetrated a quarter to a half inch into the plywood. On top of that he built a super heavy roof structure with 2x6 rafters spaced 12" apart, and three of them sandwiched together in the middle, 3/4" plywood decking and shingles. I moved the shed 20 miles. It's amazing the top did not fall off the floor, but when I unloaded the shed, the walls started to come off the floor and I had to do some emergency bracing with angle iron strips bolted to the walls and floor. No, I do not intend to drywall it. Just need to get the walls secured to the floor, especially since we gat bad storms around here at times.
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On Jul 22, 3:43 pm, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

You're over-analyzing this, and you're not understanding the loads. If metal connectors can secure a joist, they can certainly hold down a stud. What exactly is the problem with using a 2x4 metal connector and using screws? You'd be done by now and would have spent a total of ~$25.
The first objective is to tie the studs down - use metal connectors. The second possible objective is to compensate for some studs not being over framing. I don't think you'll have a problem with the plywood floor deflecting from the studs since you said the joist spacing at the perimeter is 6" OC. In any event, unless the studs have unequal loads (how?) they won't move individually. If you're _still_ concerned, throw some more nails in the 3/4" siding. That will take care of any differential shear force, which, by the way, is non-existent unless you're moving the shed!
One objective, $25, an hour, done.
R
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Because _SCREWS_ are NOT STRUCTURAL... You would need lag bolts or carriage bolts to attach structural parts to each other...
What part about that is difficult to understand ?
~~ Evan
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Sigh. ALL screws are non-structural? Do you even know what structural means? No offense, but you're talking out your ass. Are all structural components _bolted_ together? I guess you must have a tough time getting a contractor to bid on your specifications.
Simpson Strongtie, the metal connector manufacturer, manufactures and sells (STRUCTURAL!) screws. http://www.simpsonstrong-tie.com/ftp/fliers/DIY-SDTPAD10.pdf But the choice is not at all limited to Simpson's products.
There is no such thing as a fastener that is listed as 'structural', as structural means different things in different applications. The only pertinent factors in the choice of fasteners are the loads, materials involved, price, ease of installation and the ambient/ environmental conditions. There are almost certainly both screws and nails (and bolts) that will fulfill all of the objectives in almost any situation, with the determining factors usually being price and ease of installation.
R
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-snip-

I prefer nails, myself- but Structural screws- http://www.grkfasteners.com/en/RSS_1_2_information.htm
And the main point is that the OP is going through a whole lot of angst over a bottom plate that is not going to do a thing to hold the shed together. Ricodujour's method is better than hacking things to hell and slapping a useless 2x4 under the studs.
Jim
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