Best way to add HW Heater to system?

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Just wanted some opinions on the best way to add a HWH to the system. The problem is not the temperature of the water but the amount. The current electric tank is 50 gals and I have two girls and a boy to deal with. I don't think the volume is enough. The question is do I add it in series (as a "pre-warmer") or do I add it closer to the other side of the house (parallel to the system)? I'm not really interested in a tankless water heater. v/r Jerry
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BRAVO52 wrote:

The
current
I don't

(as a

(parallel to

Consider a tankless water heater, here are some brands:
http://www.plumbersurplus.com/Category.aspx?ID=8
You can install them at the point of use, or use them for the whole house.
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Still not interested in a tankless heater. Would like to add a conventional electric water heater. Any ideas? v/r Jerry
Darwin is alive and well.
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@aol.com (BRAVO52) says...

Have you considered flow limited shower heads?
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I know you said that the problem wasn't the temp, but the amount - but consider that by turning up the temp on the WH, the user will draw less hot water during a shower (i.e. keep the mix closer to warm instead of all the way to hot), which means more hot water will be available. Of course, you run the risk of scalding that way if you turn it up too much.
I do know that you DO NOT want to add a water heater in series; if you decide to add another one, it should be in parallel with the existing one - but it's tricky to do. The lengths of all the pipes between the 2 WH's MUST be IDENTICAL; as I recall a very small variance can really screw things up.
If you decide to add another, I recc you call around and have it done professionally.
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And how/why do you know this? Series makes more sense to me. Then you can turn the first one off if you don't need it.
Bob
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On 29 Dec 2004 05:24:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BRAVO52) wrote:

I'd first find out if the old heater is full of sediment; replacing it if it is might be all that is needed. If you don't have low-flow shower heads, installing them would also help. Then there is always the turn the hot water off after ten minutes solution.
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BRAVO52 wrote:

Hot water doesn't need to be heated.
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Showers take a lot less water than sit down baths. Might be worth asking them to shower instead.
If a 50 electric isn't supplying the heat, it makes me wonder if you have a bad dip tube, or perhaps the bottom element isn't heating. A plumber oughta be able to answer these.
I think I remember that gas heaters recover more quickly. Do you ahve gas or propane available?
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BRAVO52 wrote:

It's far, far easier to adjust the bathing methodologies. For example, in showering, the kids may be turning the HOT all the way up then adjusting the temperature with the COLD. Have them turn on the COLD for the proper flow, then adjust the temperature with the HOT supply.
You can get a shower head on a flexible hose with a push-button - the navy uses them. Wet down, lather up, rinse. Uses about two cups of water for the whole shower.
If they bathe instead of shower, they may be generating a miniature swimming pool.
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Dude -
As a user of the standard navy issue showering equipment for 4 years......... what you are suggesting is cruel and unusual punishment. Water saving - yes. Enjoyable - no. One of the things I most looked forward to when getting out of the service was a return to a normal, human shower.
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On 29 Dec 2004 05:24:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (BRAVO52) wrote:

You can add another heater in series with what you have now effectively doubling your capacity (assuming you use the same size heater). The only times I have ever seen this the tanks were right next to each other although I don't see why you couldnt have one at each end of the house unless the water in the pipe between the two would be enough to play havoc with the water temp. Doesn't seem like it would be enough to matter in the big picture but I don't really know for sure.
Steve B.
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Disagree Steve......
As another poster said, hot water does not need to be heated. Hooking 2 heaters in series will not double capacity, it will however double your fuel bill and cut the life of both water heaters in half. No disrespect intended, but it just doesn't work that way.
Matt
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Hmm.... I believe the answer is, for the question "series or parallel connection, for water heaters?" is, "it depends". For same-sized tanks, the best method is reverse-return. I absolutely disagree with the statement "Hooking 2 heaters in series will not double capacity, it will however double your fuel bill and cut the life of both water heaters in half.". It may be worse, or it may be better, depending on the scenario.
Try this: http://www.contractormag.com/articles/column.cfm?columnid &0
No disrespect intended, but there is way to little information about the specific setup to make a recommendation.
Matt wrote:

2
your
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I read the article, and although they do say that a series configuration will work (which is news to me, I admit), virtually all of the rest of the article says use parallel. The only benefits listed to using a serial configuration were cheaper to install and less piping to run.
"Although series piping can shave costs and work quite well under many circumstances, the first tank once again sees the lion's share of the workload and will no doubt fail long before the second tank. If a bypass piping arrangement is not in place when that happens, interruption of service is assured until the first tank is replaced. " I still maintain the way to go is parallel in all circumstances.
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No disrespect intended but your still wrong..
http://www.rheem.com/includes/resourceLibraryPDF/1231.pdf
While parallel would be superior in some applications series is also a reccomended configuration especially if you have two different tanks with different btu capacity which the OP will most certainly have unless he wants to add a new tank and replace his existing tank.
Steve B.
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Yes it does work that way...
Cold water flows in to the bottom of the first tank pushing the hot water out of the first tank in to the bottom of the second tank which pushes that hot water out the top of the second tank on to the shower. So you will fill the first tank from the bottom to top giving you 40 gals of hot water then you fill the second tank from top to bottom giving you a second 40 galls of water. Fuel usage increase will only be from the reheating of the addtional water it wasnt possible to use before and the standing loss of the additional tank which isnt that great now days since tanks are hightly insulated. This setup is very common in high end homes with the huge garden tubs.
And yes hot water does need to be heated. 60 degree water is "hot" compared to 32 degree water but that doesnt mean i want to take a shower in it. Thats a stupid semantics game and I would think most here were past the age of twelve when those things were funny.
Steve B.
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Steve -
I already admitted it would work, and that this fact was news to me.
As for the rest, I was just quoting from the source you provided - and if you re-read it, I think you'll see the consensus is to not go series.
Now go untwist your panties and come back when you have cooled down a bit.
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Acutally no you weren't quoting from the source I provided and had you bothered to read the link I provided you would plainly see that they reccomend that series is the way to go when you have two different water heaters.

I'll untwist my panties the day people like you who have no f'ing clue how something works stop posting their hallf assed assumptions on here as facts. Until that time I will continue to twist/untwist my undergarmets in any manner I so choose.
Now go read and book and come back when you have a clue.
Steve B.
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Well, that day isn't coming anytime soon, Stevie. I recommend you stock up on some gold bond to help with your panty chaffing. (And that's a fact - not an assumption).
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