Best tool for unsticking doors

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wrote:

Yep, the last time was at least 5-6 years ago.

Probably, but that's more than I care to worry about. I won't live long enough for that to be worth it. The kids can worry about that.

I think the doors were hung properly. The house is just settling. It's about 70 years old.
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Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Just a thought.... You may want to do a little checking for termite damage and/or evidence of specific compression of some wooden support structures. You can sometimes tell where the compression or settling is taking place by checking which doorway openings are getting out of square. Sometimes doorway openings that run in one direction get out of square while those that run perpendicular to that are not out of square. And, sometimes, the settling is not in the actual foundation but instead is near the center of the house in the area of a main support beam.
One of the reasons for checking this is, of course, to prevent further termite damage if that is what is happening now. And another is that it may be possible to add some supporting posts/jacks in the basement when a beam is located -- and maybe even jack things back up a little to help straighten out the doorways and prevent further problems.
In other words, the doorways getting out of square may be indicative of a problem that you can fix while preventing further deterioration, and not just "the house is still settling".
But, back to your original question -- I like the electric planer idea since you have a lot of planing to do.
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On 9/20/2012 5:11 PM, TomR wrote:

I was just thinking of another thing I did to fix a door. I jacked up the door frame on one side and shimmed the bottom bringing it back into square. I've actually used a hydraulic auto body ram to spread a wide hallway in an office building when I had to install a storefront type aluminum door and frame with access control. ^_^
TDD
TDD
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On 9/20/2012 12:00 PM, Jennifer Murphy wrote:

Everyone is thinking of power tools, have you thought of rubbing a little wax on the sticky surfaces or shimming the hinges. You can take the screws out of one hinge and slip a piece of paper or two behind it to alter the way the door fits. If you must, a very sharp wood chisel can be used to remove a thin layer of wood from where the hinge attaches. I have not only had to fit wooden doors but doors made of metal mounted on metal. If you're concerned about the appearance of the door and possible damage to it, you may have to take it down to do a proper job on the door without knocking chips out of the edges. You could also put a piece of 2X4 against the door frame and whack with a BFH, Big Freaking Hammer a few times to gain a bit of clearance. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 20 Sep 2012 16:07:14 -0500, The Daring Dufas

carefully.
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On 9/20/2012 8:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The last time I used my belt sander, it was to clean up the contacts on a pair of size 4 Square D three phase starters for the open drive 60 ton AC compressors at a bowling alley. ^_^
TDD
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Sounds a bit agressive, to me.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
The last time I used my belt sander, it was to clean up the contacts on a pair of size 4 Square D three phase starters for the open drive 60 ton AC compressors at a bowling alley. ^_^
TDD
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Mine stick due the humid summertime. I leave the door(s) alone.
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Painfully slow.
What the pros do: Remove the door, take it outside (when possible). Place it on sawhorses. Apply masking tape to both sides of the edge to be surfaced. Obtain (buy or rent) a 3+" power planer. Bosch is great, others may be as good. Usually less than $100 on sale at box stores, sometimes on line (CPO). Mark the masking tape to the depth you want, both sides. Make the cut with a light setting, continue to the line. Remove masking tape and reinstall door. Elapsed time about 20 minutes, less with a helper. This advice based on been there, done that and learned from talented subs hired to do that kind of work. Using any power toll presupposes some expertise as well as practice with it to become familiar with all operating aspects, including safety matters like eye protection.
Joe
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