best product for restaining concrete?

I need some recommendations on what to use for restaining concrete steps on our breeze way. The stain on them now is getting worn and I'd like to clean them up and restain them. It's in a covered area but it is a high traffic because it's basically the main way we enter/leave the house.
Does anyone have some ideas on not only restaining the steps but also on how to remove the old stain from them?
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Question: I applied a concrete stain to a large 8-year-old concrete patio in Reno, Nevada—an area subject to somewhat extreme temperature variations. I initially washed the patio with a mix of muriatic acid and water to clean it. I hosed it off, waited a day or so, and applied the stain with a sprayer, following the manufacturer's directions. Two years later, the patio now has areas of peeling. I would like to re-stain the whole patio again to make the color more uniform. I have heard that if you have washed a patio with muriatic acid, you cannot acid stain it. I am trying to find an expert who can tell me how to properly prep the surface, apply the stain and protect it. The stain I initially used was an acrylic.
Answer: The product you used—a tinted acrylic stain—is not an acid-based concrete stain. It is a translucent concrete paint and is topical, which means it forms a colored coating on the surface of the concrete that will wear over time if not maintained. The surface preparation for these types of stains usually requires acid etching to open the surface to allow the acrylic to adhere to the concrete. But once concrete has been acid etched, the ability of a true acid stain to take is diminished. You will need to do a test to see how the acid stain takes to get a true indication of color and effect.
As far as your particular situation, you should strip off the remaining acrylic stain and clean the surface with soap and water and a clean water rinse. After the area dries, apply the stain, following the directions provided by the stain manufacturer. If you're concerned an acid stain won't take, you may want to reapply the same acrylic stain after cleaning the surface. No matter the stain you use, protecting it with a sealer and proper sealer maintenance will be key to keeping the stain looking good. In your area, plan on resealing every 12 to 16 months.
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On Wed, 03 Sep 2014 22:48:24 -0400, ng_reader wrote:

Thanks ng for the response but I see this is for Nevada on an open patio. My climate here in Illinois is much different than that and like I already mentioned this is in an enclosed breeze way that connects the back door of the house to the garage. I'm wondering if the instructions you posted would apply to my situation?
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On Wednesday, September 3, 2014 11:24:24 PM UTC-4, wg_2002 wrote:

I think the answer is more specific to what is currently on the steps? Concrete can be stained when it's wet by mixing in coloring, then applying more coloring on top, ie stamped concrete, or it can be stained with a variety of products designed for cured concrete. Also, what some call "stain" is actually more of a paint product, instead of being absorbed, it forms a film.
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If it peels, it ain't stain.
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Thanks for all the help guys much appreciated. I'm not sure how the previous owner stained the steps so it looks like I'll have to do a little more research. I didn't even know where to start so your links/posts gave a place to start.
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