Best Pliers or Vice Grips (or similar tool?)

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Hello,
I'm trying to remove my garden hose from the faucet on the side of my house, but it won't budge. It's rusted on I think, and I'm having a hard time getting a "grip" on it to twist it off. This brings me to my question. What is the best "Multi-Use" tool for jobs like this? Adjustable wrenches just don't have the "grip". Adjustable Pliers will work, but Vice Grips permit you to "clamp" the hose. I've seen other such multi-purpose "tools" offered on TV from time to time, but I'm interested in getting a tool that is the most flexible, and durable, and versatile for these types of jobs. How about it? Does anyone have a brand, or make, of a tool like this that they just love and couldn't live without?
Thanks.
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For starters, flood with penetrating oil (any good hardware store). This should help loosen it.
Vise grips, etc. will damage things. Use them as a last resort.
Vise grips are handy. Also, a conventional pipe wrench helps (it tightens the more you lean into it). Also, I find what are known as "pump pliers" -- adjustable, helpful for the lighter jobs. The handles are pretty long, and you can get some leverage.
To avoid the problem in the future, get a small tube of plumber's grease (hardware store again), and lightly lube the threads on the hose bib. Makes getting things both on and off MUCH easier. Also, a dab on the rubber "O" seal on the hose makes for a better seal. You can tighten and seal with nothing more than hand force.
If you end up destroying the fitting, there are replacement/repair fittings available.
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wrote:

And don't miss the instructions on the Liquid Wrench can, which say to hit the connection a few times to get the fluid to go as far in as possible.

You need to have a good touch. I'm not sure if this is the place to learn or not.

Definitely. And Vise-Grip brand are the best vise grips. Very well made and strong.

I call them "water pump pliers", even though they were not useful for water pumps afaik for any car made during my lifetime.

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mm wrote:

The big Channellock pliers? they are actually useful on very old - as in 1930s - design water pumps, they have a grease cap that needs to be tightened periodically to keep the bearings lubricated - if this is not done the grease will lose its pressure and water can seep into the bearings. Oddly enough, "water pump pliers" are darn near perfect for this job :)
nate
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N8N wrote:

Yep, that's where the name (and design) originated...the original purpose has pretty much gone away but the tool still has value.
For OP, my choices--
"Ordinary" slip-joint pliers -- CEE-TEE brand 8" are best, bar-none.
Vise-grips -- Need selection from small to large; needle-nosed handy on occasion -- Vise-Grip also still the best
Waterpump pliers -- Channel-lock ok, have a favorite pair about 50 years old or so whose manufacturer can't tell you offhand...
Then there are all the specialty types such as fencing pliers/tool, snap-ring, electrical of all types/specific purposes, etc., etc., etc., ...
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Yeah, the ones that look like a long neck with a birds head on top at a greater than right angle.

My parents had the best slip-joint pliers. I have lost track of them since my mother died. I think there is a whole container of tools among her stuff, including my Handy Andy level, and maybe my Handy Andy full size screwdriver, but the only thing I want a lot are the pliers which were probably my father's.
Unfortunately, I mixed the tools in with the paperwork, and I don't want to look at the paperwork. So I'll have to do without.
Maybe they are CEE-TEE but I don't remmeber seeing a brand.
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mm wrote:
- And don't miss the instructions on the Liquid Wrench can, which say to - hit the connection a few times to get the fluid to go as far in as possible.
Hi! I am trying to loosen a hose and someone suggested hitting the connection a few times to get the fluid to go as far in as possible.
Can you suggest the proper tool for hitting the connection with? Things I've tried:
1 - My hand - now it's bruised and sore 2 - The can of Liquid Wrench - split the can and now my driveway is a mess 3 - The other end of the hose - bent the nozzle and now it's stuck on too. Do I need to buy another set of channel locks for that end? Perhaps a left handed set?
BTW I was going to hit it with the channel locks but I didn't because the user's manual said not to use them for anything other than their intended purpose (safety first!)
Any suggestions?
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The mallets with the yellow plastic head are handy for pounding on things that you don't want to damage. One poster also suggests a pair of fence pliers. They have a hammer, wire cutter, plies, and hook. Handy for all sorts of things.
My mechanical engineering friends always said, that when confronted with a difficult problem, "get a bigger hammer."
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wrote:

Given the light weight of the things involved: A screwdriver shaft. OTOH, for my motorcycle engine case, I tapped the bolts lightly with a hammer.

LOL.

Definitely.
First aid.
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posted for all of us...

--
Tekkie Don\'t bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.

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brand. This is why they call them pump pliers- they are designed for stuff like this. The leverage they provide gives plenty ot torque, but the 'crush power' is limited by hard you can squeeze. That way, unlike vise-grips, you are unlikey to crush or shatter the hose end or the hose bib itself. Of course, soaking the thing in penetrating oil for an hour before you reap on it, will also help a lot.
aem sends...
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It's not because they look like a water pump handle?

Or even a day, I think.

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On 10 Jan 2007 18:03:19 -0800, samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

If you want one tool then get a pair of standard channel locks. A better tool for your particular example would be a nutbuster type channel lock that is featured on this page. http://www.channellock.com /
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samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca writes:

2 words:
pipe wrench
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two adjustable channel locks or substitute similar but only buy a pair of the the narrow ones so they fit perfectly on the hose nuts and keep them with your box of extra hose fittings and adapters. one grabs the hose nut and other grabs sill cock to hold it in place.
samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

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Glad someone mentioned holding the faucet securely while trying to get the hose off. If you do not, the stuck hose connection will likely be the least of your problems. Larry
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wrote:

Damn, there is way too much nut and cock grabbing in this reply. If you are not a female, you must be having a very gay moment, and you are scaring the crap out of me !!!!!
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wrote:

I guess this would be a good reason to buy those garden hoses whose ends are hex shaped. I presume I have a wrench that would fit them. But I've actually never bought a hose. The house came with 2 or 3 of them, and I've found about 3 more, usually on a hose reel. So now I have about 6. I guess I'll never get to try the hex end.
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I have a short pair of Channel locks, too. About seven inches or so long. I use them a lot.
Steve
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samadams snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Channel locks for fairly easy stuff, pipe wrench when it is really stuck. Pretty much the same as all the other responses. Vice grips (carefully adjusted so they don't grip too tightly also work.
However, if you can't easily get the hose off, you need to revise what you are doing. Hoses should be taken off at least 2 times a season in most areas. We usually just use our fingers to put the hose on and off the faucet. Hoses should be tightened only hand tight. If the leak with hand tightening, the hose end is bent or more likely just needs a new washer.
Hint: One tool is never good for everything!
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