Best order for refurbishing house

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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 14:04:22 -0700, Don Y

A GOOD tile installer will install the tile level and smooth on the top surface. What the adhesive.thinset thickness below the tile is isn't critical to the finish.

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Floors are rarely level, even in brand new construction.
I was extremely careful about framing everything level and square when we built our house. But by the time we got to the cabinets, the lumber had shrunk, things settle, etc. so the kitchen floor was no longer level. Older homes are usually much worse.

As mentioned above, shimming is almost always necessary to get the cabinets level, regardless of what surface you mount them on.

Floors and walls are rarely flat. There are usually bows, dips, ripples, or textures you have to deal with.
You install the cabinets, shimming to get them all level and plumb. Then you install the toekick board to cover the bottom of the cabinets. It's a fairly simple matter to scribe the bottom of the board to match any unevenness in the floor.
In my case, I beveled the backside of the toekick board at a 45 degree angle. That left a nice sharp edge on the front of the toekick board that easily conforms to minor imperfections with a bit of downward pressure.
If the flooring has larger bumps and gaps, you would just scribe the board to match.
Unless your floor is REALLY out of level, you're not going to notice a 1/2 inch to 1 inch difference in the slopes, especially back under the toe kick area.

Most people are likely to replace cabinets and/or appliances before they would replace a tile floor. If the cabinets are on top of the tile, that's easy to do. If the tile was an afterthought, you'll have a lot of gaps to deal with.
Also, unless you build custom cabinets, most stock cabinets are designed to provide a 36" counter height from the top of the flooring. If you install tile AFTER installing the cabinets, your counter top will end up lower in relation to the floor. Especially if you add backer board and thick tiles.

Most tile comes in 2", 6", or 12" squares/rectangles/etc.. Cabinets often vary in dimension, but even modular cabinets will vary a bit depending on the shimming needed along uneven walls.
There's no guarantee the tile and cabinets will line up visually regardless of which comes first.
Yes, you could spend the time to line up the grout lines with existing cabinets, but you could just as easily plan out the tile layout before the cabinets go in. It's just a matter of planning.
If you're trying to plan ahead, it would be wiser to have the front edge of the cabinet land in the middle of a tile instead of trying to line it up on a grout line. Your eye won't notice a 1/2 to 1 inch difference in the middle of the tile. But if your cabinets line up with a grout line, even a 1/4 inch misalignment will stand out. The same reason you try to plan for half tiles along walls, so you don't end up with little narrow tiles that would highlight imperfections.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Hi Anthony,
[ER... yada yada yada... check mail!]
On 3/20/2016 6:53 PM, HerHusband wrote:

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On 3/19/2016 12:40 AM, Don Y wrote:

Why would you want the cabinets on the subfloor? That is the way a hack does a remodel.
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Ashton Crusher wrote:

depends a lot upon other factors, how much you like doing that sort of thing, if you're skilled enough to make it look good, how much time you have, what the local market is like, ask the local realtors (but most likely they will encourage you to do improvements as it is money in their pocket if a house sells for more).
IMO, none of that, if you count your labor and the cost of materials you will rarely recover the expenses. also figure the time to sale. right now is spring, get it on the market and let it go. you want to be moving in the fall or winter?
if i buy a place all of those are things that i would redo for myself to suit my own tastes. why would i want to pay more $ for things i'll replace or redo eventually? if someone repaints with cheap paint it sucks, same for the rest of it...
much better to make sure the roof is done well and that the exterior is sound. take care of anything that would be a problem for the new owner but otherwise get out and move on.
songbird
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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 3:38:15 AM UTC-4, songbird wrote:

obviously all those house flippers arent making money, and buyers dont ever buy flipped homes
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On 3/19/2016 3:37 AM, songbird wrote:

Buying, I agree with you. Selling, I do not. Ever watch any f the TV shows about real estate? Seems there are a lot of unimaginative buyers that just want to move in and do nothing. They reject houses for silly things too, that you or I can change in an hour.
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The people that quibble over the appliances are the ones that I don't understand. When dealing with a house that is over $ 200,000 they worry about a thousand or two worth of the appliances.
I bought a house about 12 years ago and to make my wife happy, the master bathroom was stripped to the studs and redone to make it look the way she wanted before we moved in.
The house I sold was turned over to some people I know and I told them to give it a 'fluff and buff'. Just paint, a few minor things,and I did replace some vinal flooring as it was well worn. Hail storm happened about that time , so the insurance paid for a new roof. Sold it myself in about 3 months.
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redo shower/tub (if there will be paint above shower tiles, paint there first) interior paint cabinets/counters flooring (unless you want it UNDER the cabinets)
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wrote:

Having read thru all the replies that seems to be more or less the consensus and seems like a reasonable way to go.
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I'm not so sure. I came in late to the thread so I may have missed something though.
Interior paint should be last in my experience to avoid dinging it up when doing the other work. The prep work can be done while you're doing the other work.
As others have said though, check with local realtors to see if you will get your investment back. Of course, if the house sells quicker, and you "lose" a couple of thousand, then you may be better off.
Charles
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On 3/18/2016 7:18 PM, >>>Ashton Crusher wrote:

Are all those things necessary? Sounds like a lot of work to make a house ready for sale. I'd talk to a couple of realtors first. Often times, that stuff doesn't pay off.
Do the things that need doing, but be careful of the money and time you invest. Sounds like you might not get a lot of that back.
A few years ago, we sold a house and all we did was update the flooring and paint. Sold almost immediately.
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 09:25:20 -0500, SeaNymph

less buy it, may require all of the above.
An empty chicken coop is hard to sell in any market. So is a house that has had the interior basically destroyed. A little lipstick on the pig CAN go a long way. However, if it is basically in good shape, you are unlikely to get your money back - much-less make a profit.
As for flippers - I wouldn't buy the average "flip" for any price.
In most cases it's a lot of lipstick on a dead pig.
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 09:25:20 -0500, SeaNymph

I our market it seems virtually everything that sells is "move in ready". My house has to have the paint done and I feel redoing the shower is a must, it' just not "nice enough" for the market plus the whole bathroom is "brass" which apparently is way out of style now. In fact, most of the light fixtures are brass and I figure they will need to be replaced with some kind of bronze/brushed nickel or similar to fit the market. And the flooring is all 25 years old and just plain out of date and style. Then there are the counter tops... plain old laminate. Way out of style now so if I do that the cabinets also need to be replaced.
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House up the street was on the market for over a year and it was painted with new carpet, pretty much fixed up to what I would consider fine move in condition. Didn't sell, didn't sell. Finally sold for about 50K less then the original asking price to a flipper. He gutted it, took out walls to create a very large "great room" setup, took out fireplace, filled in sunken living room, rearranged the bathroom, including moving the toilet so there was more room for a bigger shower, completely redid and rearranged the kitchen with all new everything. Then sold it for $150K more then he paid. I forget the exact prices but at the time I calculated that he made at least $75K for his three months worth of trouble. Houses around here just don't sell "as-is" except for rock bottom prices to flippers.
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wrote:

I am not sure how the dual agent works but know what it is. When I wanted to buy a house that was listed in the paper I went to the agency and asked about it. Got one agent that was not the listing agent, She then had to act as both buying and selling. Not sure if that is a way for them to get more money out of them or not.
I could see that if I had went to another agency and just asked them to find me a house and they found one for sell by another agency.
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report? Was it a load bearing wall, and if so was it properly supported? This is what happens in so many flips. The walls are removed to give "open concept" and the proper support restructuring is not done.. Then to top it all off, the electrical changes are not done properly, and there is no inspection and no permits - 6 months later the plaster/drywall is cracked because the structure is sagging - and the new owner has no recourse.
I would NEVER buy a flipped house without very extensive documentation of what was done. Way too many pitfalls.
I've looked at a few around here where there were NOT any extensive renovations, like moving walls - and they were scary enough!!!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

Yup, they ain't all Flip or Flop material.
Some of the renovations I have seen done by owners are scary and they aren't even flipping them.
It's even scarier since I've been watching Holmes makes it right. Houses 5 to 10 years old disaster areas because there is no knowledge or craftsmanship. Supposedly "good builders" The low bid gets the job.
--
Tekkie

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wrote:

BEST house with a 10 foot pole.
One contractor who was known for building top quality custom homes was not selling many houses back in th '80s, when builders started building gussied up chicken coops and calling them houses. Old Bill said "if they want junk, i'll build 'em junk" and he started building low-buck houses - pretty well put the worst of the cheap contractors out of business. And his were better houses.( not saying a whole lot, mind you!!)
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