Best order for refurbishing house

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Best order for refurbishing house
I will most likely be moving and will be redoing the house to make it ready for sale. What's the best order for doing these things... I'm thinking it's the order listed below.
- interior paint -redo shower/tub - flooring - cabinets/counters
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 17:18:28 -0700, ">>>Ashton Crusher"

I would do the real renovations first. Painting last.
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 22:52:42 -0500, Vic Smith

weathertight before doing any interior work. Then do all required wiring and plumbing modifications so if you need to open walls, cielings, or floors you aren't doing anything twice. Then fix all the walls, and do first coat of paint. Then do floors, then cabinets, then trim and final coat of paint.
Doing it in this order means there is no chance of unpainted wall showing behind cabinets and trim, and the cabinets etc are all accurate hight from finished floor - so things like stoves, dishwashers, etc fit properly - and any damage done to walls when doing floors etc can be touched up with the final coat of paint - while wall repairs and initial painting won't get paint/drywall compound etc on the new flooring.
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Of the items given...
1. Redo shower/tub. Any remodel work here will likely affect the surrounding paint and flooring. Best to take care of this first.
2. Paint. It is easier to paint before the cabinets are in the way and so you don't have to worry about drips on new floors.
3. Flooring. With the tub installed and the painting done, you can easily lay the floor without worrying about drips or obstructions.
4. Cabinets/counters. With the paint and flooring done, it will be easy to install the cabinets.
At least that's the order I would do them.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On 3/18/2016 9:30 PM, HerHusband wrote:

I might wonder what *sort* of flooring is going in. E.g., with ceramic tile, often want the cabinets to sit on the "subfloor" and not the tile so you'd install them and then tile *to* them (instead of tiling UNDER them).

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On 3/19/2016 12:40 AM, Don Y wrote:

No the cabinet should sit on the tile not the subfloor. What if the cabinet would need changed out? Then you would need to redo the floor as well.
John
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John wrote:

If I ever wanted to change mine I would remove them from the plinth upon which they sit - the face of which is tiled - and put in new ones, sans toe kicks.
Plinths are handy.
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wrote:

plinth would likely break taking out the cabinets, and the plinth comes as part of the new cabinets - again unless you have them custom made to fit your existing plinth. And what if you want to re-arrange and move the fridge or stove or dishwasher???
Not practical in most situations.
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On 3/19/2016 4:33 AM, John wrote:

Take your argument to its logical conclusion: if you've already got tiled floor, do you rip out the tile when you install new cabinets?
The top surface of tile is uneven. Setting cabinets ON it leaves you with a potentially unstable base and gaps under the cabinets (unless you want to make your toe kicks out of RUBBER)
Cabinets are standard sizes. It's not like your next set are going to be deeper, front to back, than your old ones. You aren't going to move the walls to squeeze in a cabinet that is 2" wider, etc.
Here, homes where folks installed cabinets *on* tile are the "low rent" variety; the installation looks very amateurish.
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<Snip>

That's what shims are for. Shims are going to be required even if you place the cabinets directly on the subfloor.

You are the only one to mention different depth cabinets.

The appearance of the finished product is a reflection of the installers' workmanship -- not weather the cabinets were installed on the subfloor or not.
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Oops, wrong "whether."
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in a kitchen putting the cabinets on the sub floor, can causea big hassle. the dishwasher will be sitting in a trough and be very hard to remove to service.
do the job right.
tile floor first, then install cabinents.
do everything in neutral type colors,
if you dont remodel first, you are costing yourself big bucks.
90% of buyers want a move in ready home, later when they have settled in they will then redo what they want.
my 90+ age neighbor died, her family refused to do anything. the home sat vacant for many months it finally sold for about 30% off of similiar homes did.
the new owner is glad he enjoys home repair, but 90% dont!
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On 3/19/2016 1:18 PM, Gordon Shumway wrote:

In the past 18 months I renovated two bathrooms. Both have different size vanities than were there previously. I took out the original sheet goods and both sit on the new ceramic tile on the floor.
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On 3/19/2016 11:57 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

If cabinets have the same footprint, then changing out the cabinets is no big deal.

Try that with saltillo tile and you will grimace each time you look at it! You'll be *caulking* around the base to hide the imperfections in the tile's thickness, depth of grout lines, etc. (toe kick reveal just accentuates these imperfections)
We talked to several tile pros when we ordered our tile -- as we were swapping out bathroom and kitchen cabinetry at the same time: "What order should we install?"
The answer boiled down to "EASIER to tile first" (less cutting and fitting) but "much better LOOKING to tile after the cabinetry" -- the floor and cabinetry look to belong together (esp if you tile on the diagonal).
Floor plans tend not to change (stove can't arbitrarily be moved in most kitchens; nor the refrigerator, sink, commode, etc.). We opted to move the kitchen peninsula a foot further into the family room and erect a pony wall behind it -- most folks don't have that luxury (i.e., the room's dimensions remain the same before and after replacing a floor, cabinetry, appliances, etc.)
Our tile pattern was planned so the tiles *fit* with the cabinets instead of just letting the cabinetry and tile "fall where they may". At $15K, I doubt folks will be eager to replace the cabinets in *my* lifetime! And, pulling up the floor is even more unlikely (removing all that tile).
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 13:17:28 -0700, Don Y

least a minor change in cabinet "footprint". Most of those that do not involve refacing cabinets, not replacing.
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 12:18:18 -0500, Gordon Shumway

and MANY cabinets today have adjustable levelling "feet" to level the cabinet - and the "kickboard" or "plinth" gets coped to fit the floor if necessary - or simply ripped to fit, with the small gap at the bottom caulked.
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On Sat, 19 Mar 2016 09:31:23 -0700, Don Y

are shimming the floor to tile level (adding another 3/8" or 1/2" plywood) under the cabinets, particularly if a range, dishwasher, or refrigerator are being installed within that cabinet area. I know from experience getting a dishwasher out of a cabinet that has had tile installed after the fact is one royal pain!!!! You need to lift the dishwasher to get it out and you can't because the cabinet doesn't have enough clearance to lift it high enough to get over the tile (this was a heavy guage floor tile on a mortar bed - over 1/2 inch higher than the subfloor)
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Absolutely 100% correct.
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I installed our cabinets on TOP of wood flooring, tile flooring, and vinyl flooring. Makes for a neater job, and much easier than cutting around the cabinets.
The only exception would be carpet, where you would install the cabinets first and fit the carpet around them.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Hi Anthony,
On 3/19/2016 7:55 AM, HerHusband wrote:

Wood, vinyl/linoleum and BATHROOM (ceramic) tile are smooth, level surfaces. There is good dimensional repeatability (unless you've a truly "rustic" wood floor/trip hazzard)
Our ceramic tile have a very deliberate texture to their surface and beveled/rounded edges. I.e., there's a noticeable distance between the top of the highest point in the texture (which is the LOWEST point for the cabinetry to rest on the tile surface) and the lowest point in a grout line. Put a (VERY LONG!) straight edge across that surface and all you see are these highs and lows accentuated against that straight line.
[Said another way, you couldn't roll a steel ball STRAIGHT across a tile, let alone a SPAN of tiles!]
With saltillo tile, the differences are even more pronounced (the tiles themselves aren't very well dimensionally controlled).
And, all that assumes the tile is laid with the same amount of adhesive beneath on a perfectly flat floor. Any imperfections translate through the (rigid) tile thickness to appear as high and low spots.
[Yeah, you can shim so the cabinets don't "rock", but the toe kick reveal will still highlight the "non-flatness" of the floor -- just like laying a square/straightedge across the surface! Note your toe kick is much wider than any single cabinet so you are now dealing with highs and lows over a 6, 8, 10, 12 ft span!]

Fitting the tile gives the same sort of finished appearance. The tile looks like it was mated to the cabinetry instead of the cabinetry appearing as an afterthought. E.g., we will lay diagonal with smaller trim tiles "outlining" the border of the cabinetry (and walls) with the "field" of tile. A lot more work (cutting) but in the homes we've examined with this approach, it really looks a lot classier.
[So, the cabinetry just plays the role of other tile: a grout line separates the cabinetry FROM the tile]
You also have to consider what the thickness of the tile does to the height of your counter wrt "upper" cabinets (as uppers tend to have limits on where their tops can be located). Ceiling heights don't magically increase just because you've lost some height to "floor thickness".
Likewise, counter heights have to consider under-the-counter appliances (e.g., dishwasher, compactor, slide-ins, etc.). We've had to carefully plan to ensure we could get these things in and out after the counters are in place (lifting countertops to do so is not an option!).
[This actually cased some unexpected problems with the WC's as they were designed to fit *under* certain other things.]
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