Best Nails for Woodshed construction ?? P-T wood ratings ?


I am going to be building a woodshed next month. The primary stucture will be pressure treated 4 X 6's, and the exterior will be covered with rough sawn cedar. This woodshed will be built on skids, so that I could move it a bit in the future if needed.
Here are my questions:
What are the best nails to use (type, and size ??)
I know with the new p-t wood, you are not supposed to use the regular galvanized nails. Is double hot-dipped galvanized ok ? Isn't stainless steel a bit of overkill? What about those coated nails ? Are they good for the new p-t lumber ?
I will be doing some bracing, to give lateral stability, etc. Is it best to use nails, or lag screws ?? If lag screws, what type and size would be good ??
On some things that I have built before and that were touching the ground or laying on the ground, I would use either .4 or .6 retention. Does the new p-t wood have similar values ? What rating should I use on the skids, that will always be in contact with the ground ?
Is it essential to apply preservative to any ends that I cut ?? If so, what is a common name of this product ?
I know these are all very green questions, but I will enjoy and learn from the responses.
Thank you !!!!!!!
--james--
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In a previous post James wrote...

James:
Here's some stuff from my standard structural notes:
Members in contact with concrete or ground (mud sill) shall be pressure treated per AWPA C2 with a water-born treatment to a minimum retention of 0.40 pcf.
Pressure Treatment - AWPA Treatment C2, for fresh water use, ACQ, ACZA or ACA, minimum retention = 0.60 lb/cu. ft.
---> Comment: If you can find it go for the heavier treatment
Above ground members exposed to weather (deck) shall be pressure treated per AWPA C2 to a retention of 0.25 pcf. Embedded poles shall be pressure treated per AWPA C23 for round poles to a retention of 0.60 pcf and AWPA C24 for sawn poles to a retention of 0.80 pcf. Cuts and Holes in all pressure treated members shall be treated after fabrication with 2% Copper Napthenate in accordance with AWPA M4.
Connectors and fasteners for pressure treated wood shall be hot-dipped galvanized or stainless steel in accordance with IBC Section 2304.9.5.
Hope that helps!
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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Thanks for all the helpful replies. I am making notes.
I assume from Bob's post, that the (newer) p-t lumber still has the retention ratings of things like .40 , .60 etc etc.
On the poster who asked what is the "new" p-t wood, I am talking about the p-t process they use now that has a greater content of copper, and will corrode regular galvanized nails. I think they started this new stuff about two years ago.
What is a "star drive lag" ??
Thanks again guys !!!
--James--
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Is this all PT lumber now? If not, how is the "new" stuff ID'd?
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In a previous post Al Bundy wrote...

Should be a tag on the end with the type of treatment, chemicals used, and the amount of chemical penetration.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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Haven't had to buy any for quite some time. I do recall looking at the tags long ago and only just remember like it has .40 and about the arsenic I believe it was.
Next HD run, have to take a gander to see a recent tag.
Thanks, Al...
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In a previous post James wrote...

YES! The penetration values for the various chemicals used are the same.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
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The star refers to the shape of the bit that fits the fastener. Just as there's hex, square etc. Go to: http://www.grkfasteners.com there's a ton of different types there.
FWIW -- star drive screws are expensive....almost scary in fact. But -- once you can pull board together one handed with a a 1/2" drill with no cam out of the bit, you'll understand. Any more, all exterior construction get these screws. You'll have to find a lumber yard or contractors source house to buy them.
Good luck,
DAC
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that's a lot of questions.
for nails, i would use double hot dipped galvanized nails of appropriate length. as a rule, nails should be twice as long as the thickness of what you are nailing, and should penetrate the underlying wood by a minimum of an inch. stainless steel is overkill for a woodshed. the only place i would use them is if anything is nailed and sitting on or below the ground. not sure what you mean by coated nails.
for fastening the 4 bys, i would use the star drive lags. otherwise 3/8" lags long enough to get a good bite should be fine.
you can still get .60 treated, though i'm not sure if it CCA or what. i would use for your skids.
if you have lightly treated wood (look at the endgrain of a cut and see how deep the treatment goes) treating the endgrain may make it last longer. but that step is typically not done by modern carpenters. so it's not essential, no.
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What is "the new" pressure treated wood?
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Al,
Check out this article (not responsible for aimless surfing once you enter this site ;-) <http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/h00127.asp
DAC
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Thanks DAC. Decent info.

You weren't kidding!
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James wrote:

Using PT lumber for a woodshed for anything except members in contact with the ground is way overkill. Others have given info on the nails.
Harry K
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Was using ACQ lumber on sole plate last garage I built, and landscaping timbers for above ground garden soil retention, 4X4s for corner posts and tensioning posts on a fence recently built, and 5X4s on porch deck. The locals recommended not using: any standard box or common steel nails, and some reported corrosion problems with some galvanized nails. First tried stainless steel, which broke under some severe torque strain conditions particularly the deck. Local Ace hardware store had some deck screws that came with some star bit in the box. These screws have light tan color, are not galvanized or stainless. Unable to run across any torque conditions that broke these screws. This is what I'm sticking with for now on with ACQ lumber fasteners.

Same as above for fasteners. I'd use a treated 1X4 at a minimum 45 degree angle on the outside walls, cutout the corners and studs to accept it. 1X4 should terminate at the bottom of the sole plate, and just below the very bottom of the last plate on a doubled top plate. If you build the wall on the ground, square up the wall first before cutting anything. Put a 2 screws spaced vertically in each stud, and 2 screws spaced horizontally in each plate to attach the 1X4.
--
Jonny



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