Best material for practice net frame?

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I am working on a design for a backyard golf shot practice net. I have the basic design worked out. Now I need to choose the material. I was planning on using PVC pipes and connectors. I called a PVC manufacturer and was told that PVC is not a good choice because a golf ball could shatter it. My design has the net mostly in front of the frame so balls should not be hitting the frame. This was to prevent richocets, but also protects the frame.
How likely is it that a golf ball could shatter a PVC pipe? The guy I talked to manufactures the stuff, so I am inclined to believe him.
Is there another material that would be better? I am concerned that metal pipes would either be too heavy or too fragile and probably a lot more expensive. Another option is wood, but I wold think it would be heavier than PVC and there is more maintenance.
Any other suggestions I should be looking at?
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Yea wood, its been on the market a few years and has a few uses, professor. BTW professor of what.
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On Sat, 23 May 2009 04:55:12 -0700 (PDT), ransley

It's also easier to work with in many ways. My main concern is weight. I think PVC might be about half the weight, especially hollow pipes.

Nucular physics: E = mc^2! ;-)
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Is that similar to nuclear physics?
Bamboo would be another choice for your net. I'll cut down some 30 footers for you if you want to come over and pick it up.
R
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On Sat, 23 May 2009 08:43:31 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

Similar, but much harder.

Interesting idea. Strong and light.
Where do I have to go to get it...Hawaii? China?
Do you work with it? Is it ready to use as soon as it's cut or does it have to be dried like lumber?
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My backyard. ;) It's a nuisance plant to a lot of people. The stuff is almost impossible to kill off and impossible to contain without digging a 2' deep trench and placing a wall of plastic or concrete.

It doesn't have to be dried. It can be "heat-treated" by flaming or smoking it. Google it a bit. They make 30 story scaffolds out of the stuff in the Far East.
R
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On Sat, 23 May 2009 04:55:12 -0700 (PDT), ransley

I went to a couple of hardware stores. I "tested" several types materials for weight and load-bearing strength. I tested several types of plastic pipe, a couple of types of metal pipe, and wood in both strips and poles.
Wood is no heavier than any of the other materials and a lot lighter than some and it's at least as strong. It would be much easier to work with than metal and at least as easy as plastic.
The only disadvantages that I can see are maintenance and splinters.
I'm going to call a couple of PVC dealers and see what they recommend, but I was surprised how well wood compares.
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How does the price compare? All the 99.99 cent stores around here sell foam "noodles" that are about four feet long. They are cylindrical with a hollow center. If you put them around PVC pipe they would protect it from UV and golf ball impacts. -- I don't understand why they make gourmet cat foods. I have known many cats in my life and none of them were gourmets. They were all gourmands!
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On Mon, 25 May 2009 01:44:08 -0700, Daniel Prince

I didn't pay close attention, but I believe the wood was chedapoer than the PVC and the metal pipes were a lot more.

That's a great idea.
These have a 1/2" ID:
http://www.poolcenter.com/pooltoys_noodles_water_logs.htm?gclid=CNHf2tjY15oCFQ9JagodCT5A3g
These have a 5/8" ID:
http://pooltoy.com/casof20holno.html
I wonder how hard it would be to thread a 1/2" OD PVC pipe through a 1/2" ID foam noodle?
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Prof Wonmug wrote:

I suspect, PEX, if diameter is suitable would be tougher. Don't know about UV resistance. I agree that PVC would be unsuitable.
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Frank wrote:

Huh? I see yard stuff made out of plastic plumbing pipe all the time. Hams even use it to make antennas from. Not sure if it is PVC or the other flavor, but it is the white stuff the borg sells. Quite common for kids backyard soccer goals, etc. Probably last longer if you only leave it out in the sun when you are using it. And if you put it together with set-screws in the couplings, rather than glue, no biggie to replace one pipe if it does break. I could see a golf ball shattering a UV-weakened pipe that was firmly anchored, but if this is a structure just sitting on the ground, I don't think it would be a problem.
You could always make it out of the plastic stuff they sell to build picket fences out of. That is definitely weather-rated.
-- aem sends...
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or cover it with foam insulation, to provide some mechanical protection.
use the schedule 40 PVC solid core stuff. its easily replaceable if something breaks.
dont over engineer it...........
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wrote:

What's the difference between schedule 40 and schedule 80? It looks like schedule 40 has thinner walls. It says threading is not recommended.
These guys sell both:
http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/product.asp?catalog_name=usplastic&category_name 669&product_id587

Anything worth doing is worth overdoing.
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aemeijers wrote:

I've seen a lot of vinyl siding with holes in it. PVC is not tough and I suspect a golf ball could shatter it. I heard of a golfer putting a ball through 2 car side windows. I also hear CPVC is particularly brittle.
Best idea is query the pipe manufacturers.
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My thoughts exactly. The stuff at the Bord is definitely PVC. I was just there.

That's why I am building my own. There is no way that I would be allowed to leave it up for more than a day or two at a time. ;-)
I bought a commercial cage that works pretty well, but the advertised "10 minute setup" is closer to 45.

My plan was already to use some sort of non-permanent connections because of storage, but it would also allow replacement of one piece, too.

It will be free standing and most of the frame will be away from the flight of the ball.

Are you talking about vinyl and polyethylene like this:
http://www.fencesupplyonline.com/vinyl.html?gclid=CPmimuDj0poCFRIcawodKGsm2w
http://www.gardnerfence.com/?gclid=CNKF4tjl0poCFShRagodlA3D2w
http://www.allvinylfencing.com/ranch.htm
This company doesn't sell plastic fencing, but I couldn't resist including them because of the name.
http://www.borgfence.com/index.html
Odd that they wear navy, not orange.
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On Sat, 23 May 2009 07:59:57 -0400, Frank

Isn't one of the main features of PEX that it's flexible? I want a fairly rigid frame.

Why? I see it used all the time in outdoor furniture and sports contraptions.
The gut who told me a gold ball would shatter PVB pipe works for this is the company. This page shows all kinds of outdoor products including a golf cage:
http://www.apiplastics.com/photo_page.html
When I asked him about that, he sorta backpedaled. ;-)
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Thin wall metal tubing. How about electrical conduit?
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wrote:

I guess the tradeoff there is strength vs weight. These guys have it from 1/2" to 6+" diameter.
http://www.home4c.com/conduit.htm
The size usually used in home wiring would not be strong enough for a 10' span and support a net. The 6" would, but how heavy? I'll see what they have at the Borg.
It would also be a little more difficult to work with than PVC or wood.
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Forget the Borg. Try a real electrical supply store for the sizes you really want.
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Gray PVC electrical conduit is UV resistant and way less brittle than plumbing type PVC. Might work quite well and not be so obvious as white tubing.
Joe
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