Best lubricant for outdoor padlock

In your opinion, what is the best lubricant for an outdoor padlock? I live in a humid area about six miles from the ocean. Thank you in advance for all replies.
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Go to an auto supply and get an aerosol can of white lithium grease. Drown the insides of the lock with it.
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That has go to be the worst suggestion yet.
Any kind of grease will attract all kinds of stuff (sand, grit, etc)and will gum up the lock. The best suggestion is to use graphite for the keyway.
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On Tue, 7 Mar 2006 15:32:18 -0500, "HeatMan"

Actually, for some situations, it's the only thing that works! The idea is to FILL the lock with grease so nothing else can get in. I used to have to cut off (the key no longer would open them) padlocks on my boat and replace them every season. I started packing them with marine winch grease, and have not had to replace a single one in several years now. The grease makes sure that all the sand, grit and salt water stay OUTSIDE the lock.
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Try STP in your locks; you will be pleasantly surprised.
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You'd think, but I use the stuff on my boat & trailer, not just on various moving parts, but also on various padlocks, which attract plenty of filth. Everything's working as smooth as silk. And, I just worked the padlocks last week, when it was 10 degrees outside. Smooth.
Salt's another issue - I have no idea how this stuff holds up.
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Daniel Prince wrote:

According to the "master's"
http://www.masterlock.com/general/faqs_careandservice.shtml
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I alway

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"6. We suggest that you do not use WD40 on your lock because dust particles may clog the pins when WD40 is sprayed inside the lock."
I guess WD40 must be the only thing that carries dust particles, eh? That's a new one!
I always get a kick out of the WD-40 myths and experts around the world. It's a lubricant, it's not a lubricant, it collects drit & grime, it evaporates and disappears, it ... well, you get the idea<G>.

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snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

using graphite for the keyway. Maybe because most graphite stuff includes oil. I don't see how powdered graphite, unless they make a very coarse grind, could make the pins stick. And, I know for a fact, having used it on locks many times, that using WD 40 to flush out the dirt works well.
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On 6 Mar 2006 17:13:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

I have a few padlocks on my sailboat, which is in a salt water environment. I buy the rubber covered padlocks that include a cap over the keyhole. I force marine grease (not the same as automotive grease) into the keyhole and the holes for the shackle. They last a few years this way. I have never had a problem opening locks treated in this manner, even when the temps are in the 20's.
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wrote:

dry graphite works well in all temps.
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But doesn't do squat to protect a padlock from salt laden moist air.
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wrote:

He was looking for a LUBRICANT,not a corrosion protectant.
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Actually, he mentioned the environment, indicating that he needed protection from moist salt air. If the lock corrodes, your graphite powder will be listed under "causes" not cures.
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I had understood that graphite was sufficiently hygroscopic to promote rust, long term.
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Looks like good advice. Near the ocean in a high moisture environment, I'd be thinking 10w30 motor oil. Might need to be rinsed out with ether or brake cleaner now and again. That, and car door locks are the only locks I use motor oil.
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On Mon, 06 Mar 2006 15:03:42 -0800, Daniel Prince

4 miles from the gulf, on a brackish river here. I use a squirt bottle with a 50:50 mix of 30 weight and mineral spirits for lots of stuff, including padlocks.
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Daniel Prince wrote:

There are two totally different parts of a lock. One is the tumbler (the part where you put the key). That you don't want to lube as much as you want to keep it clean. A zero residue cleaner is best. I like to use a little graphic when done. NOTE: WD40 is an oil and is not zero residue. It will leave a thin film of oil that will in time collect dirt as will any oil. There is a product call lock ease that works well. I will also suggest that the Teflon based lubes often work well.
The other part of the lock is the part the actually holds the thing shut. That also needs to be kept clean, but it also often needs some additional protection from the elements. For that I would agree with most of the suggestions make. A lithium based product may be best. It will likely need cleaning and re-lubrication often where you live.
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