Best dog and water resistant flooring?

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

http://www.laminam.it/Edilizia_e.asp
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ceramic tile. The bonus is that the dog will learn very quickly he can't turn or stop very well on it when he's running...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What size of dog do you have, and how often do you walk it/have it groomed.
If it is a heavy(ish) dog (lab-sized or bigger by my guess) that is consistently allowed to have longish nails, you will want to worry more about the finish you put on the flooring. You will want a lot of coats of something pretty resistant.
If you have a light dog or you ahve a dog whose claws are always cut/worn down to not touch the flooring, you don't need to worry as much about scratches.
We (my wife and I) have a miniature schnauzer/shih-tzu blend that is about 12 lbs. We have wood floors throughout the house, and after almost two years ahve seen very little effect on the wood floor. The people before us (1 year) had an Olde English Sheepdog, and therewere no scratches from him either.
--
Marcel and Moogli
http://mudbunny.blogspot.com /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry Muscle wrote:

seams, easy to clean and stand up well to all sorts of abuse. Softer than tile, no grout joints (which are harder to clean). And not too expensive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I think wood is about the best flooring surface for both humans and dogs. I have not found it to be particularly scratch-prone. What scratches *do* happen can be easily buffed out with a little stain-varnish combo.
As for the dog's nails, if they are clicking on the floor, they are too long and ought to be trimmed. Keeping the dog's nails short will go a long way toward keeping your floor scratch-free.
--
Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Every home I've visited that had a combination of large dogs and wood floor, I've found to be scratched up. A friend of mine hasn't had a dog in years, but the gouges left by her Lab is still there on the floor.

So, when are you taking delivery of Pan? I've tried all sorts of things, including daily Dremeling, but that's one dog whose quick just refuses to shrink back. I've finally resigned myself to living with it instead of driving myself crazy over it. One of these days, I'll take pictures of her nails; they're mostly white and you can see the quick really well - promise they'll make you want to cry.
Suja
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, there *is* a certain amount of upkeep with wood floors, if you want them to look nice.

That may well be what's going on with the OP's dog, but my experience has been that people just don't trim their dogs' nails frequently enough. It mostly seems to be a matter of ignorance and not of the dog having Bizarro Miracle Gro Nails[tm].

Do they bother her? Harriet had a couple of problem nails that bothered her. On one of her vet visits, I had them trimmed while she was under. From then on, I've shaved micro bits off with a trimmer, then used a rough emery board to finish them off.
--
Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No. It's not one or two odd nails (although some are worse than others), it's pretty much all the ones on her front feet, and a few on the back ones.

I've talked to the vet about what if anything we can do about it. She was of the opinion that trimming them back to where they need to be (we're not talking a few millimeters here) would require basically cutting way into the quick. That sort of unnecessary pain and suffering, we could do without.
While we're on the subject. Someone who comes to the dog park left their dog at the vet for his neuter. Picked him up later in the day, only to find out that the vet has trimmed the nails WAAAAY back, to the point where the dog was not willing to put his feet on the ground. This was without their permission, and they had the audacity to charge them for it. Ever since then he pitches a huge fit when his nails need to be trimmed. They can manage because he's a Min Pin, but a tantrum throwing Dane, I can do without.

I wish it were that easy.
Suja
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    This is what I use to do Nikki's nails. I'm always afraid of cutting too much and hurting her so I trim as much as I dare with the clipper and use an emery board to file and smooth them down to where they should be. Nikki likes this way better because I have accidently clipped a little too far a couple of times and she much prefers that I file them down with the emery board. I even think the filing might feel relaxing to her because she lays on her back snorking her approval to me.
--
Les Hilliard & Nikki the Super Shih-Tzu

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shelly wrote:

Unless your dog has things like spinal problems or hip dysplasia. We had wood floors in a hall and one room in our old house, and after Dylan's back and hips started giving her problems, it became painful for her to walk on the floors because she'd slip and slide easily. We ended up putting down runners for her comfort.
FurPaw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is some bamboo flooring that is supposedly very tough. It looks like, and installs like, regular wood flooring.
Bill Ranck Blacksburg, Va.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bamboo is cheaper and much easier to install than wood flooring. I don't think I'd use it (or hardwood) in high traffic areas if I had a large dog though. It will scratch, just like hardwood.
--
Keith

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Even after my vet trims Molly nails they still click on the floor. I have lament (sp?) flooring I love it. Nothing seems to hurt these floors except excess water. I'm talking sitting water and a large amount.
I have dropped can goods on it and nothing. No scratches from her nails either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I think the best dog is probably a German Sheperd.
Glad I could help!
Dimitri
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    I used to have several aquariums including a 55 gal and several 20 gals. Before I set them up, on the carpet, I took those inexpensive vinyl runners and placed them under the stands and made sure they extended out from the bottom of the stand a good 6-8 inches all around. The edges of the vinyl runners stuck up a little bit but it was nothing a few well placed staples didn't fix.     In effect I had a waterproof surface 6-8 inches around the aquarium which was easily cleaned. I had quite large fish in the 55 gal and they occasionally splashed so hard that they'd knock the lid up a little bit and some water would run down the outside of the tank. Add to that my occassional overslop while cleaning and/or filling the tank. I have had water leak down the back of the tank in the past, down the stand into the carpet and underneath the stand without leaving a visable puddle so I've learned this little trick from experience. The runners also helped with this because the water never had a chance to soak into the carpet. With the runners underneath and around the stand, the carpet was well protected and my dog could enjoy watching the fish from the comfort of a carpeted floor. Even with wood, tile, or vinyl flooring, the runners can help protect the surface.     If you go with carpet, all you have to worry about is the dog soiling it once in a while which if you have him/her housetrained well shouldn't be much of an issue.     If you go with hardwood, tile, or vinyl laminate you have to look at upkeep, slipping and sliding around, and constant waxing and/or sealing but it is much easier to clean little messes.     I have even seen new houses, while being built, the owners planned where they wanted to put their aquariums, had tile laid there with a generous border, and carpeted around the rest. Mind you, this is a spendy way to do it and unless you plan on keeping the home for a long time, it detracts from the resale value a little bit since prospective buyers might not want areas of tile here and there mixed in with the carpeting.     Personally I prefer carpeting. It's easier to walk on, comfortatble to sit or lay on while playing with the dog. and warmer in the winter. But, it's your house so you get to decide your preferance. I just wanted to add a couple of suggestions that I've used and seen used. Ultimately, I suppose you will have to go with what you and your wife can live with asthetically. Hope my suggestions help.
--
Les Hilliard & Nikki the Super Shih-Tzu

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thank you for all the responses, suggestions, etc. so far.
I know laminate stands up to dogs claws very well but generally not water. However, I came across a really good article yesterday that compares all the different brands of laminate flooring, including how they stand up to water (http://www.ifloor.com/articles/lam/lamwars2.html ). So I'm leaning towards getting laminate, one of the brands that scores a 4 out of 5 in water resistance. It would be almost impossible for the dog to scratch it, most water spills should be fine, and if I do get water damage it would be possible to fix since the floors click together (ie: no glue). Plus the one I'm eying seems to be cheaper than the vinyl stuff which was my other possible choice.
Thanks, Harry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keep in mind that how the flooring is installed is as important as which laminate you get. A friend spent a few grand on Laminate flooring. It was almost 1500 more than I had been quoted for a similar space (I ended up not getting it done until recently, though). There was a fire in the apartment directly across the hall from hers, and in the process of putting it out, her apartment was completely flooded.An inch of water completely covered her brand new flooring. She was crushed thinking she'd have to replace it. Her next door neighbors had gotten very expensive engineered flooring installed, but had skimped on the installation costs. They ended up having to replace *all* of their flooring as it was buckling within a month. My friends floor is, surprisingly, still fine....and its now almost 2 years later! Her flooring guy was amazing though. He did a great job insuring that everything was installed as tightly as possible. When her neighbors had their floors replaced, they went with this same guy....and can't believe the difference it makes.
Also, laminate flooring, while it *will* stand up to pet claws a lot better, will also echo those same claws in ways you just wont believe. I just had my floors done a few months ago, and while I love the my new floors (wanted hardwood, but my subfloor is concrete), it definitely took me a while to get used to hearing even my 7 pound cat walk across the floor. Now that I'm used to it, it doesn't bother me so much, but it was a side effect I hadn't banked on.
Tara
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, August 29, 2006 1:31:52 PM UTC-4, Harry Muscle wrote:

*Ceramic tile with an epoxy grout.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.