Best concrete for setting locast posts ?

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If your posts are dimensional (4x4 or 6x6) the following process worked well for me. If your posts are roundish, then simply set them in the holes with a few inches of gravel in the bottom, and use quickcrete (regular or quick setting - it's up to you.) that has been mixed to a pretty thick consistency. Level the post in all directions and cross-brace for 24 hours before adding attachments.
If using dimentional lumber, the way I did the posts all around my house, is to: 1. String a centerline along the length of the fence run. 2. Dig the hole to desired depth (in my case, 24"). 3. Insert 10" sonnet tube that has been cut to desired length/height. 4. Backfill, leveling the tube along the way. 5. Mix quickcrete (regular or quick setting - It's up to you.) 6. Fill the tube with mixed quickcrete. 7. Set post anchor according to the centerline. 8. After concrete is dry, test fit posts, mark holes, drill holes, and bolt posts into post anchors.
The fence is now over 14 years old. No rot, no leaning.
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You can just pour dry mix around the post.if you wish add a little water on top to speed setting.In a few days it will be hard, meanwhile the dry mix will hold the post in place. Be aware the posts will need to be replaced eventually ,then you will have to deal with the concrete.
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yeah and they fail faster in concrete.
but as a friend says its your back:)
OP can think about this as he digs up his rotted posts and concrete
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with slots to put wooden rails in.It was very nice looking and very durable.
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reply not cross posted!
Locust is a good hard wood but is not treated.
For a simple fence like this I would simply tamp the earth back around the post or buy a load of DGA roadfill (mixed rock from 3/4" stones to dust) which once watered in packs very tightly.
If you feel you must use concrete, fill the hole about 1/3 full of water and pour the dry mix in, poke at it with a stick to insure that all get wet. This will make a low grade concrete that can be broken when replacing a post in a few years.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote: ...

Black locust will last longer than most treated...other than Osage orange and a couple others, there's nothing better for posts (other than being hard as blazes to drive a nail or staple in, of course).
...

If they're locust, it'll probably be 20+, anyway...but concrete probably will shorten life some, but I have no experience w/ that to judge relative to w/o. Have locust line posts that are probably at least 50 yrs old and still solid. It is, however, a fairly dry climate...
--
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Yeah, the Locust will last up to 100 years on their own, and maybe shorten their life down to 75 if I set them in concrete. I am already past 60, so that doesn't upset me too much.
James
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