Best Brush Trimmer

Hi there, I live in Ottawa, Canada. I have a 2 acre lot that needs allot of brush trimming. I want to buy a brush trimmer with a blade at the bottom. I hear that Husqvarna and Stihl are the only way to go. However they are around $600 with the attachment. I also hear that Echo is decent.
Does anyone have any experience with this specific tools and which one is my best bet for good quality brush trimming tool. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bear in mind that you will have to carry the weight of the tool. You may find a lightweight chainsaw (e.g. the smallest Stihl) is half the price of a brush cutter, half the weight and a quarter the fatigue.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about a brush fire next March, before things green up again?
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
car crash wrote:

Add Shindaiwa to the list of top of the line units. You will only find them at a "real" power equipment dealer, not a home center. Made in Japan, some of the best, most reliable engines I've seen. I have a T270 and with a blade it will do just plain scary things like go through a 2" dia sapling in a fraction of a second. I also have a Shindaiwa 488 chain saw which is equally good.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I bought a Sears(Poulan) brush cutter 12 years ago to help clear 20 acres. It's still going strong. Biggest problem with brush cutters is the blades. They come with steel blades that dull REAL fast, especially when you hit dirt. I use the cheap 7 1/2" carbide tipped construction blades and throw them away when they get unusable. You'll hear a lot of "don't do that", but if you keep the rpm's down below the blade specs, you won't have any problems. The only time I lose a tip or two is when they get pinched in the tree I'm cutting. And I cut trees up to 4" diameter by making a pass on both sides. They also make a blade with a chainsaw chain welded around the circumference, but I haven't found them to be any better than the standard steel blades. Red
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Red wrote:

With a Sandvik steel brush blade that was dulled by snagging some hidden rusty fence wire on my Shindaiwa T270 I was still able to swipe completely through a 2" dia tree in a fraction of a second. No stopping and waiting for a traditional cut, just swing the blade at the tree and it pops out the other side - really that fast - positively scary. This was repeated on a number of similarly thick gnarly mtn. laurel bushes all before I resharpened the blade the next day.
Pete C.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you just want to clear large areas, have you though about renting a brush hog? They're like a heavy duty lawn mower that can take out heavy brush and saplings. They pretty much chop the brush up as well, so there's less cleanup too.
Paul F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
car crash wrote:

Look at what brands the pros are using. Determine what sort of local support network the manufacturers provide. A brand that is used by a majority of professionals and which is sold and serviced by a reputable local dealer will probably make you happiest in the long run. I wound up with a Stihl based on these criteria but I've yet to test the quality of service from my local dealer since in four years it has not required anything beyond sharpening the metal blade or installing more cutter line.
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Go to Nepean-Kanata Aircooled engines out near Stittsville and buy a Stihl ;-)
[No I'm not affiliated with them, just purchased a Stihl FS85 from them that's now at least 10 years old and has never needed servicing when used on my 10 acre chunk of West Carleton ;-). Pricy? Yes. Worth it? Very much so compared to the previous crap.]
Upper end Echos and Poulans are decent and see some contractor use. Most pro landscapers or tree service people use Stihl or Husky. HD carries Echo, but have few if any of the high end ones.
You need to make sure you're getting a professional model. Straight shaft, heavy duty motor. I believe one of the distinguishing features with a better motor is roller bearings in the engine rather than sleeve. They last a _lot_ longer.
A unit that can accept a 7 1/4" circular saw blade means that you have lots of options. I have a 4 tooth Stihl blade, but don't use it very often. It also has "saw" option which is nothing more than a 7 1/4" circular saw blade. Haven't really needed it yet, I'd use a cheapie circular saw blade rather than Stihl's if I needed it.
[I'd probably use a carbide wrecking blade. A trifle less aggressive in cutting due to slight reverse tip angle, but better control and it'll better withstand contact with things I'd rather it didn't like rocks.]
A chain saw may be more appropriate for some of the larger stuff. Only you can answer that. If you already have one, never mind.
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.