Beneful dog food.........

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I got curious and did a search. It seems there was a recall in 2007 for aflatoxin, which comes from mold on peanuts and grains, and is said to be one of the most powerful carcinogens ever discovered. But despite lots of complaints, I didn't find anything about any actual evidence currently.
Why not change to a better product? Whatever is in Beneful, it's clearly on the level of junk food. Personally I wouldn't eat anything from Purina or Nestle. That's industrial food product. There's no reason to expect that it's made with fresh, healthy ingredients. Industrial food products are sold by advertising, not by quality. Beneful seems to be made mainly of corn meal filler (for fiber) and chicken "by-product meal". Presumably that's the feathers, droppings, guts, organs, and whatever else is left over after chicken processing, sterilizied, dried and ground into powder. Yum. At *best* it might include the chicken mush used to make "fake" chicken pieces in cheap restaurants, obtained by pressure-spraying the chicken bones to get off any leftover residue. (I say fake because the mush is glued together and apparently bleached to look like a piece of white chicken meat.)
Are you really going to miss Nestle chocolate? If so then here's your chance to taste chocolate that actually tastes like chocolate. A quick search shows Nestle chocolate chips contain "artificial flavoring". How bad can chocolate be to need artificial flavoring?!
Any decent chocolate bar should have *at least* 50% cocoa solids. If the percentage isn't even listed that's clear evidence that it's junk candy.
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[...]

Liar.
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Somebody is lying!
http://www.labelwatch.com/prod_results.php?pid 2503
They use red ink for the "artificial" entries. Makes it easeir for trolls to read. ;)
nb
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email.me:

They are. Here's a photograph of an actual Nestle ingredient label:
http://techiefather.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/350x-nestle-info.jpg

And easier to spot the lies, too...
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Yeah, like I can read that!
Where does it say whether or not Nestle's includes GMO foods? Oh! Not required, you say. How convenient.

You have proof? Let's see it. And not some picture of a lable too small to read.
You better pull yer head out. Nestle's is one of the bad guys. Ppl are fighting them, tooth and nail, all around the planet. Got water? If not, it's probably cuz you didn't pay Nestle's enough for it. That, or they jes stole it from you.
nb
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| > They are. Here's a photograph of an actual Nestle ingredient label: | >
http://techiefather.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/350x-nestle-info.jpg
| | Yeah, like I can read that!
It's also apparently 2 years old, as well, and doesn't match any of the items on the page you linked. (I also got my info there. It's surprising how much variation there is among products. Some of them even still include hydrogenated fat.) But Doug Miller is unusually rude, uncommunicative and just happened to have a picture handy, so I'm guessing he has some kind of personal interest in Nestle's reputation.
| Where does it say whether or not Nestle's includes GMO foods?
This is going a bit OT, but I came across a very interesting Consumer Reports article last week. Unusually, it was available for download:
http://www.greenerchoices.org/pdf/CR_FSASC_GMO_Final_Report_10062014.pdf
They tested processed foods labeled organic and/or GMO. The gist of the result was:
* Organic labeling can generally be trusted as non-GMO.
* Packages labeled "Non-GMO Project Verified" can generally be trusted as non-GMO.
* Anything else -- natural, GMO-free, etc means pretty much nothing.
* If it's not organic and it contains soy or corn in the US, one should assume it's got high GMO content.
But with many foods in that category there's no reason to think they're particularly edible in the first place: Kelloggs, General Mills (GM and Nature Valley), Frito-Lay (Doritos), etc. Those are all factory food companies.
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 5:14:01 PM UTC-4, Mayayana wrote:

Why yes, I'm sure Doug who's been here for years has a new job as a shill for Nestles. They hired him this afternoon.

The specific claim you made was that Nestle chips use "artifical flavoring". So why the segue now into GMO? But even that is pretty dumb. If you look at the ingredients for their chocolate chips WTF is GMO? Cacao? Would be the first. You made the claim that Nestle used artifical flavoring in their chocolate chips. The fact that you;re now talking about everything except that, is pretty much proof that Doug is right.

Only because you're desperately trying to evade.
but I came across a very

Rest of irrelevant GMO drivel deleted.
You hippies are something else.
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Fine, don't take my word for it. Go to a grocery store, pick up a bag of Nestle chocolate chips, and look at the ingredients list yourself.
No artificial flavorings.
Either you're a liar, or you're mindlessly repeating what some other liar said.
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| Fine, don't take my word for it. Go to a grocery store, pick up a bag of Nestle chocolate chips, | and look at the ingredients list yourself.
It's interesting what one can and can't find online. I was unable to find any ingredients lists at any Nestle site. But I did find this:
http://chicago.suntimes.com/business/7/71/374363/nestle-chocolate-artificial-ingredients
Nestle was pledging a year ago to remove artificial flavors and colors (artificial colors?!) from many of their candies by the end of 2015. Did they? Maybe. Will I now buy Nestle products? No. I wouldn't consider it. Aside from political and business issues, and the fact that at least up until recently they considered artifical flavors and colors to be proper ingredients of candy, there's one glaring issue that I happen to find relevant: their chocolate is almost tasteless compared with good quality chocolate. Also, some of their products still appear to have hydrogenated fats. I can't confirm that, though, because Nestle doesn't seem to want me to see their ingredients lists.
I generally try to buy food products from local or known, accountable companies. That's not always so easy, though. For instance, I've been buying Muir Glen canned, organic tomatoes because the cans say they don't contain BPA lining, and because I don't consider Whole Foods house brands to be trustworthy. But it turns out that Muir Glen is actually owned by General Mills. Does GM allow them to make a decent product? There's no way to know. That's the problem with factory food. Decisions are made by businessmen and products are more marketing than substance. The marketing and name brands make things very confusing. Coke owns Honest Tea and Green Mountain Coffee. Pepsi owns Naked Juice. Post owns Erewhon. Dannon owns Stonyfield Farms, which owns Brown Cow. (yogurt) It seems the best indicator of sellout companies is when they suddenly get good distribution. Which is a case made for the local food fad.
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email.me:

Yes, it sure is. Especially interesting is what you can't find, when you're not looking for it.

You didn't look very hard, then. https://www.verybestbaking.com/products/4031/tollhouse/nestle-toll-house-semi-sweet- chocolate-morsels/
NB: verybestbaking.com *is* a Nestle site.

Totally irrelevant, of course -- you claimed that Nestle's chocolate chips contain artificial flavors. "Candies" is not the same as chocolate chips, which are baking ingredients.
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I didn't have any problem reading it.

We were talking about whether it contains artificial ingredients.
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I'm sorry. I missed the part where you were appointed god of this newsgroup and specifically forbade anyone expanding on the subject.
Troll.
nb
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Come back after you've done something about that reading comprehension problem.
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On 03/14/2015 07:04 PM, bob haller wrote:

Were you feeding them Beneful and nothing else? That could have been the problem. Dogs should have a variety of foods.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
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I believe beneful had had troubles for years, in a minor way. management hunkerd down and ignored the problems succesfully.
now for unknown reasons the problems size has grown exponentially, and managements hunker down response isnt working.
soon nestle beneful will act as though this is a brand new problem and steps will be taken to address the issue.
if for no other reason, while this can destroy the beneful brand it can damage the purina brand and can effect the parent company purina.
right now management is no doubt wondering what shall we do?
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wrote:

As an animal lover, I want to Thank You for posting this. http://tinyurl.com/o3h9fzw Confirms this is NOT a hoax!
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Several weeks after a lawsuit filed in California claimed that thousands of dogs became ill or died after eating Purina's Beneful kibble, two senators are urging the Food & Drug Administration to open an investigation into th e allegations. Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, along with California Senator Dianne Feinstei n, sent a letter [PDF] to the FDA calling for the agency to quickly investi gate claims that Purina PetCare Company's Beneful brand dry dog food contai ns toxins. The senators also called for immediate updates on the implementation of FDA requirements that could prevent such harmful contamination from occurring in pet foods. In late February, it was revealed that a California man had filed a class a ction-seeking lawsuit against Purina saying the company's dry dog food cont ains substances that are known to be toxic to animals and can lead to inter nal bleeding and other serious health issues for pets. The man alleges that less than a month after beginning to exclusively feed his dogs Beneful dry kibble, all three became ill and his 8-year-old Englis h Bulldog eventually died. According to the lawsuit, illnesses experienced by thousands of dogs across the country were a result of toxins in Beneful such as, but not limited to , Propylene glycol and Mycotoxins. Propylene glycol, the lawsuit states, is an automotive antifreeze component that is a known animal toxin. However, the substance is also an FDA-approv ed food additive for humans. As for Mycotoxins, the lawsuit states they are a group of toxins produced b y fungus that occurs in grains. Representatives for Purina have said that the lawsuit was "without merit" a nd that the company would vigorously defend itself. In their letter to the FDA, Durbin and Feinstein are asking for updates to the agency's implementation of a 2007 law enacted to help prevent contamina ted pet food from reaching animals. Under the 2007 law, the FDA is required to ensure that pet food companies r eport to the agency within 24 hours of determining they have an adulterated product in their supply chain. Additionally, the law requires the FDA to set ingredient and processing sta ndards for pet food, strengthen labeling requirements, establish early warn ing systems for contaminated products and mandate that companies report con taminated food and make key records available during investigations. "The components of the law that FDA has implemented are important to the pu blic and veterinarians, namely the searchable online recall list posted on the agency's website," the letter states. "We appreciate that FDA has imple mented an online database to inform consumers of pet food recalls. However, eight years later, most provisions of the pet food safety law have not bee n implemented and protections Congress enacted are not in place." Tell a friend:
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I wonder if there's a problem with the Purina cat food? I've been feeding that to my cats for years. Maybe I'd better change.
TIA
--
You know it's time to clean the refrigerator
when something closes the door from the inside.
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Me too, but I feed them both soft and hard food, and of course cat snacks. My older cat stopped liking what i bought for years. Found only one type of purina they like. I'm sure mold and fungus.problems can exist and be random.
Greg
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