Beneful dog food.........

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I have fed my dogs beneful forever, perhaps 20 years.
anyhow my dogs were acting wierd, throwng up a lot and lethargic.
saw on the network news that beneful is killing dogs. So I changed food, we had a bunch of sample packages.
within 2 days dogs were back to normal.
called my vet and they said they are getting bscattered reports of these same symptoms, that clear up when beneful is discontinued....
I have 3 30 pound sacks, one just opened.
So I called beneful they were very nice. I asked them if they want a sample, sure they said.
but they only do a visual inspection no tests for chemical containments.
this makes no sense at all.....
Some idiot in the distribution system could use a needle to inject rat poision into dog food. and beneful says we test each batch at the time of production.
purina beneful and nestle are all the same company. apparently they never heard of tylenol contamination...
in any case i will see what it will cost to get the opened bag tested, join the class action suit, not for money but to get them to address the issue.
I will miss nestle candy, since i will quit buying any roducts from their organization.
they claim its not a problem its all social media driven hype
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bob haller wrote:

Wonder if it is made in China now? Our dog is always on "Blue" dog food. So far sso good.
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On Saturday, March 14, 2015 at 8:09:11 PM UTC-4, Tony Hwang wrote:

maybe its made by the same chinese company that makes flooring for lumber liquidators.
benefuls lack of concern bugs me a lot. theres far too many defective products being sold where the manufacturer either ignores the issue or worse actively covers it up.
like Chevy cobalt ignition switches. we had one of those that fit the profile exactlly. short overweight driver with heavy key ring. wifes car quit often for no apparent reason.
now take takata air bags, toyota run away cars, going back awhile bad firestone tires...
feds need a law, forward all safety defects on to consumer product safety agency, who would track troubles, manufactures would be required to self report problems.
attempted cover up? CEOs go off to prison, companies fined 5 years worth of profits.
make cover ups or ignorance so expensive its not worth it.....
after 1 or 2 ceos are lead off in shackles to prison all products would be safer for consumers
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On Saturday, March 14, 2015 at 8:21:37 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

You are quick to condemn the company here, but apparently have unshakable faith in the govt. If the govt is so smart and capable, why haven't they figured out what the problem here is? If it's as simple as just sending some samples off to a lab, the govt has that capability too as well as it's own labs.
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On 3/15/2015 9:51 AM, trader_4 wrote:

GMO food is toxic for people and their pets. Right now big ag, big chem and big pharm are making billions so their highly-paid stooges are working furiously to keep the facts covered up. When the truth finally comes out, this will be bigger than the tobacco scandal.
Keep in mind that the FDA only exists to promote the health of big agriculture. They don't give a shit about you or your pet's health.
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 10:55:57 AM UTC-4, Jack Lapin wrote:

A quick segue into kooksville, without any basis whatever.

Obviously you're clueless. The FDA has been involved in many instances of identifying bad pet food, finding the cause, getting product recalled, etc. But that interferes with the narrative, doesn't it?
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trader_4 wrote:

Not that I blame the FDA , but GMO food IS toxic - not because it's GMO but because it's loaded with glyphosate , which IS toxic . Don't have the link at hand but I read an article about a pig farmer in Europe <Netherlands ?> that stopped feeding GOM feed to his pigs and a number of problems he had disappeared . Yup , empirical evidence , but still ... you won't catch me using that stuff on anything my family eats , and I'll buy non-GMO when I can .
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 12:13:39 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

Sure, anecdotal report of one pig farmer, there you go..... What powerful evidence. And curiously, if it's glyphosate that's causing the alleged Beneful problem, why exactly is it apparently confined to Beneful and not all the other pet foods that also use all kinds of grains? Good grief. If it was that, one would expect widespread problems across all kinds of pet food.
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trader_4 wrote:

You're welcome to stuff anything you want into your piehole . I choose to be more discriminatory . And I read no mention of glyphosate being incrinimated in the pet food problem , you musta pulled that one outta your ass . You're pretty good at that ...
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 12:52:44 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

I pulled glyphosate into this? Good grief. The thread is about reported problems with Beneful dog food. YOU're the one who brought up glyphosate:
"Not that I blame the FDA , but GMO food IS toxic - not because it's GMO but because it's loaded with glyphosate , which IS toxic"
And while it hadn't been "incrinimated" by anyone, you sure attempted to do so.
Idiot.
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I notice you completely gloss over the fact GMO foods are essentially banned in most of Europe. It's the reason Monsanto withdrew its FDA application for GMO wheat. Zat powerful enough?

As you should. Problem is, in US, there is zero GMO labeling. Gee, I wonder who is responsible for that little --but hotly contested!-- oversight?
nb
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 1:19:40 PM UTC-4, notbob wrote:

It's simply not true. GMOs, like everything else in socialist Europe are heavily regulated and approved one at a time. There are many GMOs approved in the EU. Food containing GMO is legal, as long as it's marked. There is no "ban" in most of Europe. The fact that socialists and hippies are screwing around with it, trying to delay it, make it case by case, isn't very compelling evidence as to it's safety. And if it's unsafe, why is it being used in the EU at all?
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trader_4 wrote:

Follow the money . 'Nuff said .
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Heres my belief........
Nestle beneful knows there dog food is hazardous but is attempting to cover it up.....
GM knew cobalt ignition switches were hazardous but covered it up.
lumber liquidators knew some of their products were hazardous but tried to cover it up.
both car makers and takata knew the airbags were hazardous but covered it up.
.toyota knew their vehicles had runaway acceleration troubles but covered it up.
all of these were finally made public after people died and manufacturers LIED
when companies are only concered with the bottom line and reputation means nothing. it makes covering it up or trying to the best fiancial decision.
add some laws, put a couple CEOs in prison, fiancially devastate some companies and products will be safer for everyone.
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 2:16:43 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

The only flaw in that argument is that reputation means everything to the bottom line. Destroying the Purina consumer brand would be about as dumb a thing as one could do. Even if they only cared about the bottom line, the smartest thing they could do would be to quickly correct whatever could be causing the problem. If they changed the formulation to add something, just go back to the previous one. If they changed suppliers, go back to the previous ones, etc. On the other hand, if they really don't know and it's something that's entered via the long list of things that goes into their product, then you can't fix it until you find it.
I'd also note that the FDA has known of this, been tracking it for quite some time too. If it's some poison that's easy to indentify, kind of odd the FDA apparently can't figure it out either.

Don't you think it would be a good idea to find out what's actually wrong, first?
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 2:42:26 PM UTC-4, trader_4 wrote:

companies find defects, and rather than come clean and fix the problem they decide it cheaper to cover them up.
takata knew for years its airbags were killing people, and even once the info became public, they fought a general recall to save a buck.....
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 2:51:16 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

That's certainly true in some cases. In some cases the "fix" could involve hundreds of millions, for example recalling cars. In that case, I can see motive to try to avoid a recall. But even that doesn't explain what happened at GM, for example. They knew they had some kind of problem with the ignition switches moving too easily to the off position. Your profit explanation is a reasonable explanation of why they didn't do a recall earlier. But it doesn't explain why they kept using the same switch for many more years. The only thing that had to be done was have a pin that was 1/8" longer in the switch. Certainly a profit motive doesn't explain their failure to at least fix it moving forward.
The problem with the Beneful thing is that I don't see reason to believe that a fix would cost them anything. The product was OK for a long time. Just go back to making it like they used to make it. And if they know what the problem is, but are covering it up, it has the liklihood of severely impacting the whole company as dogs continue to die, get sick etc. It just doesn't make sense to me that they know what it is, but won't fix it and are going to continue to make a deadly product. It's possible, but it doesn't seem too likely. It seems more likely that they can't figure out what it is either. The FDA knows about it, so far apparently they either haven't looked into it or if they have, they don't know what's causing it either.

So did the govt and they let it go on. The problem with Takata may be similar to the problem with Beneful. My understanding is that to this day no one knows what the exact cause of the problem is. They thought it was excess humidity on the factory floor, then something else, etc. And one aspect of that whole scenario that made no sense to me was the auto companies were recalling cars based on where they were registered on the theory that they were only likely to misfire and cause injury in states that were hot and humid. And again, the govt is OK with that. So, the same car in FL gets recalled, if it's in MD, it does not.
I see a couple Senators are getting involved in the Beneful thing now. Maybe they can at least get some more attention on it at the FDA.
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In our case I have a just opened 30 pound bag that appears to make our 5 dogs ill.
yet beneful refuses to test it for toxins,
toxicity could come from something in the bags material, some idiot poisoning in the supply chain etc.
they should get as many samples as possible, compare production locations, ship and manufacturer dates to see where the source might be from.
instead they refuse to do anything but a visual inspection...
remember the tylenol scare. idiots were adding poision to the bottles. perhaps beneful doesnt want more expensive packaging?
our dogs always had beneful, but have a varied tasty food.
liver, fresh boneless chicken breasts etc
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On Sunday, March 15, 2015 at 4:27:01 PM UTC-4, bob haller wrote:

That's what they said they would do with your product. Do you know that they haven't already tested hundreds or thousands of samples of their product that was returned where dogs died, were hospitalized, etc? That is samples that should be even more probative? This has been going on for quite some time, no? If you were the manufacturer, would you spend your time lab testing one more sample from a case with mild symptoms or would you be trying to figure out other strategies to pursue with what you already have? If I tested a lot of product already, I'm not sure I'd send out more to do the same tests that show nothing. I'd be looking at what they haven't tested for in what they have from cases where dogs died, autopsies had been done, etc. In other workds, I'd be looking more closely at samples from severe cases. And I'd be looking at anything that changed in their formula, sourcing, etc that could account for it. I agree the visual inspection makes no sense.

Anything is possible, but this looks more like a possible contamination of something in one of the supply streams. That's been the experience so far with similar problems. If it was a common poison, done intentionally, seems likely they would have found it by now. And it's going on all over the country, isn't it? Seems unlikely it's someone tampering with the product. You would certainly think they've looked at whether it's product from one factory, one distribution center, etc. They almost certainly have and can't pin it down. The alternative that you suspect is that they know, just want to deny it and not even correct whatever it takes to fix it. That seems unlikely to me, but anything is possible.
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On 3/15/2015 5:02 PM, trader_4 wrote:

Mu view also. We feed it to my grandson's dog with no problems. She does get other foods to supplement too. Like a scrambled egg every morning. My wife won't get up at 5:30 to make me breakfast, but the dog gets hers at 8. Can't say that I blame her. This is a 7 year old, 65# pit bull that grandson got from someone that could no longer care for her. Sweetest dog I've ever met. She also makes sure my wife takes a nap every afternoon.
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