Bending Rebar

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Hey...then I could start a newsgroup just for people who bend rebar in their spare time. Or not. I could just go fishing.
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On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 19:23:18 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Try this:
http://www.thinkgeek.com/cubegoodies/toys/60d4 /
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....and, those things don't look like they're designed to bend rods into a LARGE U-shape. Hold your arms straight out in front of you. That's about the width of the upside-down U-shaped wire structures I'll be making.
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Oh... I was thinking you were making the canopy out of something else, and just wanted the rebar for stakes, to hold it down. If you're talking about 30" diameter hoops, I'd use a pair of 10' 2x4s for spines, drilled for short lengths of EMT, fiberglass rod, or black-pipe, depending on how durable you wanted it. (thus making a block-letter 'U' with right-angle corners.)
Of course, you realize that by the time you're done with this, you'll be well on your way to having built a set of cold-frames, right? If you replace the wire mesh with lucite panels that you can latch part-way open, you'll be able to start your growing season earlier, end it later, and for a $20 extra equipment investment, get a couple light-fixtures and one of those termostatic-control plug-adapters they were talking about in the well-house thread a week or so ago, and get some frost-protection too. Then of course, you can string hose along either the top or the bottom or both, and get a mister and/or trickle irrigation... and then.... oh, never mind.
--Goedjn
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That's EXACTLY what I'm saying. The "something else" will be fence wire (the green plastic-coated stuff with the 4" or 5" square openings). It'll be the 6 foot high stuff. Take a 10 foot piece off the roll, bend it into a U like a quonset hut, make the U-shape permanent using (probably) some scraps of copper electrical wire across the bottom, so when I left the structures up to work under them, they don't want to pop outward and damage the adjacent plants.

I already have a very effective cold frame. During warmer weather, I remove the lucite panels and replace with chicken wire. But, the garden's 40 x 40 feet. I'd need a lot more cold frames to protect all the smaller plants (lots of greens, carrots).
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Here in the South, we just use an animal control electric fence. One strand of bare wire all the way around the garden, with an insulated handle for an access gate. Won't electrocute, but it will damn sure get your attention. Total cost $75 or so, depending on how far you go. They will control as much as 75 miles of wire, depending on the model you buy.
For reference, no affiliation. http://www.flemingoutdoors.com/Electric%20Fence%20Energizers.htm
RJ

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Yeah...this is on my list, too. But, based on the real-life experiences of several gardeners in this neighborhood, I'd need 2-3 strands to deal with the various critters. Put one strand low enough for raccoons, and the deer will step over, or worse, jump over. Worse because they'll trash whatever's in the way of their feet. So really, 3 strands are needed here.
Other than that, I like the idea. Got a whole plan in my head. But, won't have time until later in the season to do the necessary trenching (to the garage) for the electrical feed.

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