bending emt by hand.

Page 2 of 2  


You can bend offsets with a conduit bender, I have done it, but I am no way qualified to tell someone how to do it!
Same way you learn piano, practice, practice, practice! Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/14/2005 4:49 PM US(ET), snipped-for-privacy@intertainia.com took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

http://www.idealindustries.com/pdf/bendguid.pdf
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thank you so much, but I've seen this. The level of detail is weak, for me, and even the chart's smallest offest is like 2" and for 1/2" emt, it think the offset is very small to pop into a box.
Thank you,
tom

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.hatvideo.com/videodownloads.html How to Bend Conduit With a Hand Bender pretty good instructions for offsets on a pdf download there.
some handy multipliers for depth of offset with angle of bends, example; 30degree bend 3/4 offset would be 3/4 x 2 mark seperation = 1.5"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The pdf explained how to do a quick 'box offset' what I'm guessing I need to pop emt into handy boxes. Sounds quick and easy, no mulitpliers(which was confusing the heck out of me for such a small offset). Just two 10degree bends bend-to-bend.
Thanks!
later,
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes there is a simple way to do offsets with a normal wheel bender. I say this to differentiate from a hickey bender. They are not the same tool. Offsets have been made for years with wheel benders. The offset benders are a fairly new development. They are efficient but I know many electricians who did not buy them when they came out and stayed with the old fashioned method. Most won't get it out for 1 or 2 offsets. You can see several here: http://198.247.193.8/wwwroot/greenlee/bending.pdf
Several people have told you to go to a couple of different sites to see how it is done. If you are going to buy a new wheel bender, they usually come with a small booklet or drawing showing you how to use it.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Subject: Re: bending emt by hand. Newsgroup: alt.home.repair

Man it's easy. Just put the bender on the end of the emt and bend about an inch up. Then flip the emt over, slide it back about 3" and bend again. Buy an extra stick so you can practice- on second thought you better get a few extra sticks, because one you master the offset you're going to need prictice with sweeps.
--
-Graham

Remove the 'snails' from my email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

Guys we need to listen louder. The bender that he did not want to buy is called a "little kicker". It is manufactured by Greenlee and sells for about $160.00. He has a regular bender. He is asking for good technique for making box offsets with a regular bender. He would like to avoid buying offset fittings or a single purpose box offset bender. -- Tom H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Subject: Re: bending emt by hand. Newsgroup: alt.home.repair => Takoma Park Volunteer Fire Department Postmaster <= wrote:>Guys we need to listen louder.
I understood him just fine.
--
-Graham

Remove the 'snails' from my email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:10:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@intertainia.com wrote:

I'm not experienced enough to teach you how, especially long-distance, text only. But I have done it, and I discovered a trick that made it easier for me. And this is Usenet, after all, where any idiot can pose as an expert. :)
There are 2 bends to make, of course. I make the one closer to the end of the tubing first. How much do I bend it? I don't really know. A little. Then I turn the tubing around, putting it about as far into the bender as it will go.
Here's the trick. I put it on the floor at the threshold of my garage. There's a drop-off of about an inch and a half in the floor level there, which allows the bent part of the conduit to face "down" while still allowing the bender to touch the ground. I suspect that this could be done on a 2x4 if your topography isn't suitable.
I bend it until the previously "bent" part is now parallel to the ground again. A fair percentage of the time I get it right. Buy extra tubing and START with the offset end. If you screw it up, cut it off and do it again.
There's another reason besides cost to bend your own offsets. In my experience, wire pulls through tubing a lot more easily than through any kind of connector, so the fewer of them you use the better.
Greg Guarino
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Guess you'll hate me for this, but I bought a pair of Greenlee kickers on Ebay, 1/2" and 3/4", and the finished work looks so good I cream my jeans just looking at it.
And yes, these bends can be made with a hand bender - when an accomplished pro does them they look good. Practice, practice, practice.
On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:10:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@intertainia.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ugggg, better get some new jeans off ebay too!

thanks.
later,
tom @ www.Stuff4Free.biz    
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.