Bending aluminum

I want to bend a 3" long, 1/4" thick x 2" wide flat stock aluminum bar to roughly a 7" radius "U" shape which will give me a 14" (ID) gap between ends. I'm reading methods of bending aluminum and some say heat while others say bend cold. Since it's not a tight bend, I would think cold bending would be fine, but obviously uncertain. I'm also uncertain if it's best to use 6061 aluminum or, as I read, a softer 5052 which is easier to bend. The overall use will not reach the rated tensile and yield strengths of either grade, therefore, the only issue is price.....5052 is more expensive.
Anyone experienced with this type of work?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/21/2014 6:53 PM, Meanie wrote:

I would bend 6061 cold. You will probably need to use something smaller as the bending form as the material will have "spring back". It will require some experimenting to discover where to clamp the piece and what to use for the bending. I assume you meant 3' not 3" to end up with a 14" gap. 1/4" will require substantial force to create a smooth bend.
--


___________________________________

Keep the whole world singing . . .
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
'Meanie[_4_ Wrote:

I would take that piece of stock to any place listed under "Wire & Wire Products" in your yellow pages phone directory. They bend steel wire up to 1/2 inch diameter right here in Winnipeg into various forms needed for different purposes. They also bend 1/2 inch steel rebar into circles and connect those circles by wiring them to straight pieces of rebar to make steel reinforcing for concrete fence post footings. See if the stuff they're bending has to be round. If not, they can probably bend your aluminum if you give the guy a $5 tip.
--
nestork

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and has a lot of spring-back. It ( annealed) will return to pretty close to T6 in a short time after - and the OP says he does not need anywhere close to the strength of 6061 anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

3” long?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, June 21, 2014 9:46:19 PM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It probably goes with the 3" nipple in the other thread.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 22 Jun 2014 03:29:45 +0200, nestork

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is usenet group rec crafts metalworking. The folks there know this kind of thing. Sadly, I don't get RCM on my computer.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A long time ago I was working on one of my little scheme and acquired a length of 6061 T6 stock under the mistaken impression it would be easy to work. 3003 might work but I don't know how it's priced compared to 6061.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

also, watch the 'grain' we had quite a few the workshop bent along the wrong direction, they all cracked over time. Envision a wood grain, you get the idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

easier than CRS) In T6, it makes CRS look soft.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 22 Jun 2014 07:17:20 -0700, RobertMacy

"with the grain" unless it was sawed off the wrong side of a piece of plate - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looks like he followed your suggestion.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.