Bender Board for New Lawn?


I'm installing sod this weekend and wondering whether I should opt for bender board around the perimeter of my new lawn? The lawn will be surrounded by a bark-mulched garden area. Is a border of something like bender board recommended to keep the lawn (blue fescue) from straying? If so, any tips on installing bender board? I'm assuming you'd lay the sod first, then "frame" it with the bender board. I'm a complete novice to this, so any input appreciated. :)
-Fleemo
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On Nov 17, 11:24 pm, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

It's a personal preference thing. I like the natural look and don't mind edging the beds once in a while. It's quick and easy to do on a smaller property. It might be that I've never seen a border that I really liked.
R
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As "R" said, it's completely up to you. It will not stop the fescue straying overly much, but will aid in keeping the bark off the lawn.

Depends. You can lay the lawn, then wait for it to establish somewhat (allow it it settle) then dig a channel around to place the boards. If it is a large recreation lawn, and your not to fussed on the slight level changes, i'd say this idea is the easier of the two. The second is to border it first, bring the sods so they but closely to the edge of the board and then, after the lawn has settled, go around with a half moon and re-trim the whole area. At the same time as doing this you can cut T sections into the lawn and carefully lift any sunken areas and fill them with loam.
IMHO, as a keen ex-professional landscaper, if you're installing it because it looks good to you, then go for it, but if it's just to try and stop the fescue spreading, I wouldn't bother. Nature has a way of laughing at ideas like that.
One thing I will mention, just to give you the full story, is if it's a decently wide board, it will help with the cutting/ edging of the grass. If not, it may hinder the cutting but will still aid the edging.
hope that makes some sense, if not email me....
Barry
www.woodworking.wizkids.co.uk
snipped-for-privacy@muckleshed.com
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A wealth of information here. Thank you for your input. :)
-F
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Landscapers would agree with R. Most professionally maintained properties are edged (~6" deep around the beds). More costly to do it right, but could work: a narrow paving strip of stone,
but it really depend on the plant material and the size of your garden.
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