Bend back aluminum chair frame?

Bought a set of four patio chairs with aluminum frames. The right-front leg on one chair is welded about 5 degrees inward.
Thought I'd buy a dowel and try to gently press the leg into position. Better ideas out there?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 4 May 2014 19:31:28 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Exchange it at the store.
If there was no store, or the store only had those four, I doubt if this can be done successfully. But I think I'd fill the whole tube (Is it a tube?) with sand and cap it to keep the sand in,, lay the leg over a barrel or something with the curve you want, and push with my hands and arms and body.
In theory, if you can find or make something with the curve you want to bend it over (or something straight if it's too curved now.) you might not need the sand, but since I doubt this will work, I'd pull out all the precautionary stops for all the early tries, meaning I'd use the sand. It will keep the tube from collapsing where it bends or bending too much at one place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

BTW, I had a hard time picturing the problem and what you wanted. Maybe a better description would yield a better answer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2014 10:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I've never had much success rebending aluminum tube chairs. I'd be very concerned that the chair will collapse at some future date. Most likely while seating someone over weight and lacking in humor, who has a pit bull for an attorney.
"I think I better think it out again"
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hi, If you change the original design by doing some thing like that, it may compromise the stability of the chair when some one specially heavy person sits on it. Speaking from an experience.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/4/2014 10:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Had the same problem with a cheap table and chair set from Big Lots ... made in China, of course. One chair had one leg a little off. I thought they were aluminum, but yesterday, because of your post, I got out the old magnet and checked ... the magnet stuck. When I bought them 4 years ago, and put everything together (I guess that makes them made in NC!), one chair wobbled. As I said the leg was maybe 10 degrees off. I gently pushed on it with sharp impulses and eventually it was ok. YRMV. We use the set once or twice a day during good weather and they still seem to be holding up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/7/2014 9:28 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

Replying to my own post, I forgot to mention, it was not round tubular steel legs, but they are sort of rectangular ... about 1 1/4" by about 3/8", with the 1 1/4" side slightly rounded outward.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.