Before I tear apart this faucet...


...I need some opinions. I have a leaking faucet in the tub. It's a single handle, Peerless model. I have been leery of trying to fix it because from what I've seen in my reading, it's hard to tell what I might run into in the faucet. I know zip about doing this and don't want to end up disabling it altogether!
One of the sewer guys who was here working the other day (yes, the house is fraught with plumbing woes right now) eyeballed it and told me it's "...the easiest kind to fix. You just take off the handle and you'll find two little springs and two rubber washers. You need to replace the rubber washers."
What do you guys think? Given that I have never repaired any faucet in any way, am I more likely to be able to fix it or to end up destroying it and having no shower until I call a plumber?
Jo Ann
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First thing is look at the paper work that came with the faucet Not available--go to the manufacture's web site and look up the manual for the faucet. At this point you should know whether or not you can handle the repair. If it's similar to the single lever faucets that are typically used in the kitchen it should be relatively easy to repair. If you open it up change all the parts--kits should be available that will have everything that you'll need. Call the manufacturer and ask for advice. In many cases they will actually send you a kit (free) that will contain the parts you'll need. MLD
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Option A = Hire a plumber and watch him carefully so as to learn what he does.
Option B = homework: locate on the WWW instructions with pictures showing how to replace washers in this type of faucet, including a checklist of tools and preparations (e.g. turning off the water beforehand.) Then do it yourself.
If B requires buying a tool you do not already have, option A may suit you better.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Jo Ann,
Peerless does have a web-site with diagrams and advice. From your brief description it's not clear whether you need new parts or just need to tighten something, so go to the web-site. Parts for your faucet are probably available at most hardware or plumbing stores, if you need parts. Spray the parts that need to unscrew with penetrating oil (WD40) before you start and let the oil work for half an hour. Turn off the water. Use the right tools. These faucets are not hard to fix.
Dave M.
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David Martel wrote:

WD-40 is a water dispersant, not penetrating oil, and the two shouldn't be confused. WD-40 has very limited lubrication properties, which are reduced after the carrier fluid dries.
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And put a towel over the drain so no parts escape.
David Martel wrote:

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Sounds like one I did for some friends. Like you say, two springs and two washers. The kit was less than three bucks, and I was in and out in an hour. They were leaking hot water, so it was a big thing to them.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Before you take it apart, if it is only a small drip and only when the handle isn't straight up, work the handle a bunch from side to side. Sometimes some grit gets in and stops things from working right and working the handle a bunch in all directions cleans it up. I had a drip from a sink 2 years ago. Worked the handle a bunch and its been fine ever since.

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As a final consideration of how bad it could get, consider what is on the other side of the wall the shower faucet is on. If it's a closet, or a room where you can easily just repaint a wall, then if you get screwed up and have to replace the whole thing, it still isn't too bad, as you have easy access from the backside.
If, on the other hand, it's an outside wall or similar, then I think you're going to have a much bigger problem if total replacement is needed.
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Thanks so much to everyone who responded here! I went to the website and although it did not have the information I needed (I think this is kind of an old faucet), I was able to email Peerless and they responded with detailed schematics and instructions for fixing the faucet.
Wish me luck -- my first plumbing repair :)
Jo Ann PS: And thanks for the reminder to cover the drain, too!
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