Bees that want to bore holes in my carport beams

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Oren wrote:

After you think you have killed them all, listening will tell you if you're right. It will detect a bee if you haven't seen a hole.
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On Mon, 03 May 2010 17:31:39 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

They are carpenter bees. The major goal is to get them organized, unionized, and able to build you a new garage. This requires special training.

I'd put a moth ball in the hole and patch it with plastic wood. Someone told me to do this and it works pretty well.
None tried to sting me. Good too since I was 14 feet up a ladder. Of course I didn't try to hit them or anything.

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The preferred method is a dust designed for Carpenter Bees and a cork pounded into the hole, then paint. A dowel would be better, but more difficult.

They will buzz you, but are very unlikely to sting. Any damage you do to yourself by falling off the ladder is your fault. ;-)

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What are the behaviours of Mexican carpenter bees? Arrive on the back of a pick up truck, and take a nap in the afternoon?
--
Christopher A. Young
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On May 3, 5:31 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

I would get a garden sprayer and spray the wood with a oil sealer preservative, it wont take long and the chemicals will keep out bees, even mix in a bit of bug killer. it will really help preserve the wood. There is Horticutural Oil a Pest Killer used on plants you could mix into the mix you make up
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The population around our houses doesn't seem to increase. Every year there are 2 or 3 of them.
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(Dennis M) wrote:

I've had oil base stain and latex paint, and the bees just chewed right through. The only thing that works is to kill them. I tried every kind of bug death out there, but the only thing that worked was hair spray. You pump it into the holes and it gums up their respiratory systems and they die. It's much cheaper and less toxic than bug death, and it works. You can get it right into the holes and it works fast. Then plug up the holes and wait for the next bee to show up. You can just spray the bee directly with the hairspray and it's drop in a few seconds. Easy peasy.
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(Dennis M) wrote:

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The idea isn't to instantly kill the adults,rather to treat the nests to kill the larvae when they hatch, late in the summer. To do this use Drione dust on their nests as deeply as possible (they sell long snout dusters for this purpose). The adults then drag the dust even deeper into the nest as they go come and go. In August, when the kiddies hatch, the dust will be there waiting for them. If you don't get the larvae, you'll be doing it all over again next year.
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If this is true I'm curious as to why they've never bothered a wooden railing I have on my front porch which very close by. It was constructed in 2006 and I gave it a primer and two coats of some good Sherwin-Williams 25-yr. paint, brown in color, a short time afterward.
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wrote:

Umm, like I said, they ate through wood with both latex paint and oil base stain/primer/everything else. I've lived in the house for 25 years and they will eat though anything.
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Dennis M wrote: ...

Generally they pick a spot that is also somewhat protected from weather and I'd guess the railing is much more open.
Also, they prefer beams/rafters/larger structural pieces and some species seem more attractive as well. I've heard it said there are other possible factors such as vibrations/sound/etc. that attract/repel as well altho I don't know that it is fact/proven to be so.
Do know local REA co-op had heck of a time w/ pileated woodpeckers attacking certain poles because the wires set up vibrations that they read as dinner. Modifications of mounting spars eventually after much effort reduced the problems significantly. Them suckers would top a pole completely...
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dpb wrote:

Seems that when I first moved to TN I would seldom see pileated woodpeckers. I never knew woodpeckers that big existed before. (over a foot head to tail) Woody the Woodpecker was modeled after them.
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snipped-for-privacy@dennism3.invalid (Dennis M) wrote:

Don't know-- but I have a bow window and they like just one section of the fascia. It's been 10 years- and about half of them have included carpenter bee damage. Woodpeckers cleared them out for a couple years, but they came back to that same section last year. They never touched the two short sections of fascia, that may well have come from the same 1x6. All were primed and painted with oil base gloss paint.
Someday I'll get around to putting up plastic fascia boards.
Jim
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(Dennis M) wrote:

I tried spraying carpenter bees, but they are too fast. As soon as I hold up my arm to spray, zooooom! They fly away at super speed. Guess I'll have to treat the holes they bore into.
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LMAO!
A golfer kept losing his ball between the 1st and 2nd hole. Advice to him was to keep his legs closer together.
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Here's a link with some info: http://unexco.com/carpbees.html .
This company is in New Jersey (USA), so a lot of the information is more specific to that area.

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