Bees in the ground?

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RBM (remove this) wrote:

will this work for rodents or just insects?
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It works on yellow jackets. I think rodents have a few more brain cells

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On Sat, 16 Sep 2006 07:07:19 -0400, "RBM" <rbm2(remove

I was going to say the same thing, but you have a lot more experience than I.
Still, mice and maybe other rodents are very smart. When too many mice got killed on my second floor, they stopped coming up here. They routinely change the places they go to avoid dangers. The Tom and Jerry cartoons probably aren't far off. Of course they use lab-size rats in mazes and time them, and watch them get better each time they run the maze. I guess they can change the maze and the rat is still faster for having trained in the other maze. Aren't beavers and groundhogs rodents. They live in society and share responsibilities. One does't think of moles as being smart, but maybe they are too.
I was amazed however when a guy in the old fraternity house we lived in threw a shoe or boot at a mouse, hit it, and killed it. I didn't think they were killed that easily. Then he took it to the cat, which may have been sleeping. The cat gradually opened its eyes, looked for a second or two at the mouse, and then zip, quickly used its paw to scoop it into his mouth. Only the tail was out of his mouth.

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I had the problem. They were too far down for hardware store sprays. I finally called a pro, and I'm glad I did.

If you can wait for frost, that will work.
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You probably have yellow jackets rather than bees. These critters all die over the winter, except for a queen that has probably flown on to a new spot. Poisoning the nest now won't do much good.
http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC2510.htm has a nice article.
HomeDecoy wrote:

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DLC wrote:

Um, your own link recommends poisoning them with Sevin.
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HomeDecoy wrote:

Gardens need bees.
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wrote:

Just build a nice hot fire on top of the nest. Get some paper and wood and let her burn. Ashes will add useful nutrients to your soil, and no chemicals will be used. If you live in the city where fires are not allowed, build a nice hot fire in your charcoal grill and dump the hot coals in garden.
Mark
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Sevin dust is both the safest and also particularly toxic to bees. It breaks down fairly quickly, especially if it rains, so you have to reapply every several months.
Ignore the idiots who say it isn't safe. It is. Every farmer uses Sevin and it is used on just about every crop. Very extensively studied and shown to be 100% harmless to humans and other mammals. In fact, it's also recommended for outdoor animals to control fleas and ticks, by rubbing it into their coat. Google for "Sevin safety" or something like that and you'll see all the research.
However, are you sure you can't just leave them alone? Are they really harming anything? Depending on what you actually have, they may be harmless if they are not aggressive. Bees are very beneficial to the environment and should be left alone if they aren't causing a problem.

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Unrevealed Source wrote:

Not so.

Google for "Sevin MSDS".
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Norminn wrote:

It's less dangerous than paint. I read once where someone painted an elephant (!). It died. If you drink paint, you will suffer. In laboratory experiments, rats who were force-fed five gallons of Martha Stewart Latex developed distended stomachs and became lethargic.
Use according to directions and you'll be golden. (or you could accomplish the same thing by painting yourself orange).
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HeyBub wrote:

stuff, but genes count :o)
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Norminn wrote:

Not really. You're a victim of scare mongering. Sevin is less toxic than Cherrios in 7-Up.
From Pesticide Information Office Extension Services of Cornell, Michigan State, Oregon State, and UC Davis, funding via USDA.
"No reproductive or fetal effects were observed during a long-term study of rats which were fed high doses of carbaryl [Sevin]. The evidence for teratogenic effects due to chronic exposure are minimal in test amimals. Birth defects in rabbit and guinea pig offspring occurred only at dosage levels which were highly toxic to the mother. A 1980 New Jersey epidemiological study found no evidence of excess birth defects in a town sprayed with carbaryl for gypsy moth control. There is only limited evidence that carbaryl causes birth defects in humans. The EPA has concluded that carbaryl does not pose a teratogenic risk to humans if used properly "
http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/extoxnet/carbaryl-dicrotophos/carbaryl-ext.html
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clipped

Your Cheerios and 7-Up do that?

Always the big "if", which is not what most people do.

http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/extoxnet/carbaryl-dicrotophos/carbaryl-ext.html

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HomeDecoy wrote:

If your critters are yellow jackets, they can be very dangerous. Only stinging insects that pursue victim. In Florida, they tend to have larger colonies and can swarm in reaction to just the vibration of someone walking nearby or operating mower. Victims can get massive numbers of stings.
Malathion is one chemical used on them. Haven't read the data recently, so don't recall the toxicity stuff but they sprayed it from airplanes over populated areas of Florida when citrus pests were a threat. That implies it is relatively safe :o)
Whatever you do, if applying dust to the nest after dark, be careful not to disturb them. No light, or flashligh with red lens. If I was going to dig them up, it would not be after the first frost. Water with detergent is good for drowning all sorts of bugs, but I haven't taken on any yellow-jacket colonies. Their nest construction is pretty cool .. engineered to make it tough to get them, so dust that they contact and carry down to nestmates works best.
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Norminn wrote:

Manifestly not true. For example, Africanized bees will pursue up to 300 yards.
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HeyBub wrote:

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wrote:

If you think a hornet won't pursue you, just go slap a nest and run like hell. They will correct your misperception.
--
Mr.E

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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says... :) Oops! Forgot about those, and we have them in Florida now. Any others? :) :) A disturbed bumble bee nest will give a good chase.
--
Lar

to email...get rid of the BUGS
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Norminn wrote:

I think carpenter ants. But it's hard to tell.
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