Be prepared for a spate of garage door opener problems.

http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?catP700&id 04120602320001764353 or http://tinyurl.com/4nbdr
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Garage opener problems, we can live with them, but they better not mess up with our TV remote controls!! :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
All the TV/VCR/etc. remotes I've seen use an infrared beam, not RF.
Perce
On 12/06/04 10:41 am f/256 tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?catP700&id 04120602320001764353

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/6/2004 12:05 PM US(ET), Percival P. Cassidy took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

My Time-Warner Cable box's remote will work even if I point the remote in the opposite direction of the cable box or if I have the remote in my pocket (to play remote tricks on little kids).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some Cable boxes use a RF remote, but most use an IR remote. IR remotes are often powerful enough to bounce a signal off a wall or glass and operate the equipment. One test of the IR power is to see how many layers of thick cloth that the remote will still function through, so many IR remotes will work through your pocket.
www.remotecentral.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many new higher end (not supplied with TV) universal remotes have an option RF signal that can operate equipment through an RF to IR converter.
www.remotecentral.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So if it's not a problem, you can always make it a problem. Isn't technology wonderful!
:-)
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

I've seen high frequency audio remotes. Too high pitched to hear. Had a sqeaky wheel on a vacuum cleaner once and it would turn the TV on and off! ;-) Yes, this was back in the 60's
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/7/2004 9:44 AM US(ET), Tony Miklos took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

My ex in-laws bought a new Zenith TV with a remote. One of the first offered back in the early 60s. Only 2 functions, one to raise-lower the volumn and the other to mechanically turn the channel dial. It used a light beam that had to be aimed directly at the TV's light receptor. It worked pretty good, unless the sun was shining on the set, then it would operate the controls by itself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I thought the first Zenith remotes used high frequency tuning forks that were hit by a hammer mechanism (like in a gun) when the button was pushed. I've heard of a jingling dog collar causing the channel to change.
willshak wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art Todesco wrote:

LOL! I forgot about the motor changing the mechanical tuner! Ka-chunk, ka-chunk, ka-chunk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
f/256 wrote:

http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?catP700&id 04120602320001764353

So you can be more couch potatoes? Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
willshak wrote:

http://my.netscape.com/corewidgets/news/story.psp?catP700&id 04120602320001764353

This is exactly the sort of problem the FCC is supposed to prevent, not chasing Howard Stern off the air for using the same language that Oprah gets away with (admittedly the context is a little different)
Best regards, Bob <-- doesn't like Howard Stern or Oprah, but that's not the point
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No fault of the FCC. It is the direct result of the manufacturers chosing to supply devices in a frequency band that was already owned by someone. All such use comes under an agreement that any devices must not interfere with communications and must tolerate any interference.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Whether it is a TV remote, garage door remote, baby monitor or other RF devices, the frequency they are allowed to operate is dictated by the authorities, they don't get to pick any one they want to use.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

FCC has nothing to do with these frequencies. They are regulated by a separate agency because they are used by the federal government.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 02:12:17 GMT "Ish" used 24 lines of text to write in newsgroup: alt.home.repair

I didn't know that. So reading both websites I gather that the FCC handles regulation of certain parts of the spectrum: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services /
and the NTIA allocates spectrum use, no?
http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/aboutntia.htm
--
-Graham

Remove the 'snails' from my email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's nice, but the FCC still controls frequency allocation for all bands to anyone/everyone.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am sure that it was the FCC that allowed manufacturers to use for garage openers a frequency that "belonged to" the military -- on condition that the garage door openers do not interfere with military communications. And if the interference now goes the other way, it's the responsibility of the manufacturers of the door openers to take care of it.
Similarly, all these other UNlicensed "Part 15" devices (cordless phones, wireless networking products, etc., etc.) are not allowed to interfere with licensed services, and the users must put up with any interference that they experience. (Read the labels on these things.) But when a CB or ham radio transmission interferes with somebody's cordless phone, guess who is seen as the "bad guy."
BTW, many of the large-screen TVs on the market are not certified for use in residential environments because they generate too much interference: they are "Class A" devices, not "Class B." Bet the sales people at Best Buy won't warn you about that.
Perce
On 12/06/04 09:10 pm Ish tossed the following ingredients into the ever-growing pot of cybersoup:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.