Be careful when the power goes off

A local business with apartments upstairs caught on fire recently after a storm knocked out the electricity. The storm caused flooding in the area, and because of the flooding, the building and other nearby buildings were evacuated. The flooding did serious damage to the downstairs business. If that was not enough. The person in one of the apartments had been cooking something on an electric range, and when she was told to evacuate, the power was off, and she was told to leave immediately. Six hours later the power came back on, and no one was around to notice the food on the electric range, which started on fire and burned out the entire apartment and part of the next door apartment.
Who would have thought about something like that happening. But I got to thinking that in a multiple unit building like that, they really should flip off the main breaker before the last person leaves, and then turn on each apartment and/or business AFTER inspecting the unit for anything that was left turned on.
I just thought I'd mention this, because it's something to think about when there is a disaster occuring. I'd suggest shutting off the gas main too, because if it goes out and later comes on, who knows what might be left turned on.
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You know, that really gets me to thinking.
One woman I knew lost power, in the bitter cold winter. Lived in apartment, the neighbor moved out, and had the power turned off. The power co pulled the wrong meter, and she came home to find the apartment cold. Holliday weekend. She called the power co, who couldn't get someone out for a couple days. In those days, the baseboard radiator heat froze. When it thawed, there was water every where on the floor, and did considerable damage. She called the landlord, who suggested to run the oven for heat. She refused, monoxide. Someone suggested run the heat off a generator, but she didn't think a generator would run a boiler. (wrong.) I heard about this later, and my idea was to run a wire off the neighbor's circuit panel and temporary wire to her boiler. Easy enough to do, if probably not totally legal. So, she refused the three helps, and had a disaster. Yes, this is a true story. Yes, she's blonde with attitude. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
A local business with apartments upstairs caught on fire recently after a storm knocked out the electricity. The storm caused flooding in the area, and because of the flooding, the building and other nearby buildings were evacuated. The flooding did serious damage to the downstairs business. If that was not enough. The person in one of the apartments had been cooking something on an electric range, and when she was told to evacuate, the power was off, and she was told to leave immediately. Six hours later the power came back on, and no one was around to notice the food on the electric range, which started on fire and burned out the entire apartment and part of the next door apartment.
Who would have thought about something like that happening. But I got to thinking that in a multiple unit building like that, they really should flip off the main breaker before the last person leaves, and then turn on each apartment and/or business AFTER inspecting the unit for anything that was left turned on.
I just thought I'd mention this, because it's something to think about when there is a disaster occuring. I'd suggest shutting off the gas main too, because if it goes out and later comes on, who knows what might be left turned on.
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Bob F wrote:

Year ago when I was in the Army and old Sargent said a person not smart enough to keep them self from freezing ought to freeze, I think about that a lot.
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