battery powered drills; auto 12v yet?

A year or two ago I wound up calling manufacturers asking if they had any battery powered drills that could use a Pb 12v car battery. They all said no saying the low impedance would burn out the motors. I was surprised given the current capability of NiCd. Now the Li are on the scene. Anyone heard of a drill capable of using the car battery? Anyone used a car battery with a drill?
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Since you are willing to put up with a cord, why not use a 115v drill and get an inverter for the car.

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I dont see why it wont work, maybe they just want to sell batteries.
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wrote:

IIRC,Hitachi used to sell a cordless drill that had an option for a belt-mounted battery pack,with a coil-cord to the drill.
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Jim Yanik
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Tuff to do up at the cabin. :-)
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Much voltage drop so make the lines short or larger. Further, you need to fuse the lines way down preventing short circuit (meltdown or explosion) of a few hundred amps at the drill.
There is a cordless drill out in the market a few years ago that could use either battery or an external power supply - don't remember who make it but should be easy for the DIY to do.
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drill is whatever is required for the proper amperage at 12vdc. What are you/they talking about?!
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... of the battery.
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Not exactly. 12V static from the drill battery a little more static from the car battery (most will be about 13V) then put the drain on them. The drill battery is likely to drop down to like 9 Volts quickly (internal resistance) but the car battery may only drop down to 12V. That difference could burn a motor that was not designed for it.
Now my questions is why not just use the 12V charger and charge one battery while you are using another?
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Joseph Meehan

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I have a cheap 12V drill that is interchangeable with a 18V power pack. No problems so far, but I don't use it much either.
Voltage drop is huge on a 12V system and if anything should be ok for a 12V drill. I use #4 cables from the 12V battery to the car power amp for the sub woofers - less than 10' of run at that, and mostly for voltage drop.
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10 - 1.2v nicads are fully charged at 1.35v per cell or 13.5v for the pack, at 12v the pack is essential dead, a car battery will be fine. the impedance story I think is nonsence.
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wrote:

Right. Or buy a photovoltaic solar panel and install that on the cabin so you can watch your 12 volt TV.
R
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all batteries have an internal source resistance(impedance,or Z) that limits how much current they will output.Some types have much lower internal Z than others.
electric motors draw their highest current at stall.
IMO,the main worry would be burning out the speed control in the trigger;they are only designed for a set amount of current capability,and may not have overcurrent protection.
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Jim Yanik
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He could use an inline fuse, my RC car has a 30a fuse for 9.6v , he could start with a 3a fuse
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Take a 300W inverter and connect it to your car's electrical system. Take an AC drill. Plug it into the inverter.
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Want battery unit.
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wrote:

Any 12V car battery could run any 12V dc drill or a 6V motorcycle battery could run a any 6V dc drill. If you're handy, all you need is a disconnect, 2 wires and a fuse to protect you and the drill.
New battery technology is now pretty good, something like 2,000 charge cycles vs. 500 cycles, 3x the run time and 1/2 the weight of a NiCd - that's the hype anyway. Why bother with a hefty lead acid that you shouldn't use it indoors without ventilation?
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weight fumes acid
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