Battery memory on NiCad cordless drill

Page 2 of 3  
I have nicads just starting to crap out, they are Makita-Panasonic, made in 84- 22 yrs old, Learn your cells characteristics, don`t believe the drill manufacturer, they make to much money selling replacements.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 6 Aug 2006 05:38:56 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:
:I have nicads just starting to crap out, they are Makita-Panasonic, made :in 84- 22 yrs old, Learn your cells characteristics, don`t believe the :drill manufacturer, they make to much money selling replacements.
I think NiCads nowadays last longer than they did many years ago. They used to be said to last 5 years, and that's pretty much what I found. I've had some that seem to last longer nowadays. I think it depends on the quality of the batteries and their history of use.
I've heard stories of cell restoration - techniques for getting rid of dentrites that short circuit cells internally. Also, there are techniques for otherwise restoring cell capacity, I believe. The deep cycling technique may work if used in such a manner as to NOT cause the reverse polarity of any of the battery's cells.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6 Aug 2006 05:58:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:
: :> Four years is past the maximum life of a nicad even you you have :>only used them lightly. : :Maybe my 10-year-old nicads never read the book :-)
Indeed, I have NiCads that must be 8+ years old, are in many seasons very very seldom used and they seem to be reasonably adequate. I suspect I can revive my drill NiCads. I'm not shopping just yet.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

the NiCds in my B&D Dustbuster lasted 10 yrs,but they were a type designed to stay on the charger all the time when not in use. I had a local DeWalt service center replace the 4-cell pack because it was cheaper than buying a new DB.
My first set of Makita 9.6V sticks lasted 7-8 yrs bacause they were used often and kept charged. When I ceased using them regularly,they quickly failed,even maintaining their charge.Same for my B&D VersaPack 3.6v screwdriver packs.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
: wrote: :>: :>:> Four years is past the maximum life of a nicad even you you have :>:>only used them lightly. :>: :>:Maybe my 10-year-old nicads never read the book :-) :> :> Indeed, I have NiCads that must be 8+ years old, are in many seasons :> very very seldom used and they seem to be reasonably adequate. I suspect :> I can revive my drill NiCads. I'm not shopping just yet. :> :> Dan :> : :the NiCds in my B&D Dustbuster lasted 10 yrs,but they were a type designed :to stay on the charger all the time when not in use. :I had a local DeWalt service center replace the 4-cell pack because it was :cheaper than buying a new DB. : :My first set of Makita 9.6V sticks lasted 7-8 yrs bacause they were used :often and kept charged. :When I ceased using them regularly,they quickly failed,even maintaining :their charge.Same for my B&D VersaPack 3.6v screwdriver packs.
I have quite a few of those B&D VersaPack 3.6v screwdriver packs, and don't use them much. I suppose there's nothing I can do to prevent the batteries from dying early. I must have about 8 of those batteries. They are mostly less than 2 years old.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Some chargers have a diagnostic or "tune-up" mode that may help if you leave the batteries in for an extended time, so it's worth trying. Unfortunately, at 3 to 4 years it would be common to see some degradation in the performance of a nicad, regardless of how much use they have had.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A lot of good info here, but I have some also to offer.
The key problem is "lightly used" - that means the NiCd cells will develop a memory, unlike more modern ones. A memory of being charged, then leak-discharged, then trickle charged, etc, etc. The only good way around avoiding this, is using (as others have said) a discharge cycle (or use to flat) before recharging, and not leaving them flat.
The age of the cells has NOTHING to do with the expected performance, as long as you have cycled them properly. I have NiCd cells still working strongly from the mid nineties.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A nicad is charged at 1.35v, its dead at 1.2v, listening to the idiot that says run them dead will kill them or reverse their polarity and ruin them. Nicads are meant to be stored at 1.2v or discharged, they are not Lead Acid type , do not sulfate. Leaving them on the charger is bad. But your drill company does not tell you this since their real profit is giving you a drill, and seling you replacemeny packs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

some chargers are designed to be able to leave the pack in,some are not. You need to check your manual.

It's been my experience that for longest life,NiCds are best used often.(use it or lose it) Once you start storing them for long periods,their life decreases. NiCds also have a self-discharge rate;just sitting in storage,they discharge on their own.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Yanik wrote:

Probably right about the use or lose it.
If you don't use them much you need to keep checking the voltage at least once every 1-2 months and make sure the voltage doesn't drop below 12V. Full charge on a 12V NiCad is about 14V, but that degrades quickly to about 13V and I check the voltage when charging and stop before it reaches 14V. Overcharging is the number one cause of batteries going bad.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Months ? Nicads ? Wet Cell , in a plane ... OK . Dry types? from da store , for your drill ? naaaaaah . 50% in a 20 days !!
Li-Ion is high rate power , loss can be 1% /month . priced out of reach , ..... I tossed all my Nimh ! Just too good to be intimadated by price ! But they die if too much amps charge above the 3.65 vdc level .
All batteries will float if the amps are very low .
( BTW Harbor Fright tiny driver $20 , w/ Li-Ion has no greater than a 1 aH single cell ) .
George E. Cawthon wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I read the responses below that state you should not drain the battery but when I googled *NiCad Batteries Drain Completely* there are articles that state you should drain them. Here are a few of the articles.... http://www.nyu.edu/its/pubs/connect/archives/95summer/edwardslaptop.html http://www.ehow.com/how_3037_battery-life-laptop.html
Frankly, I have no idea which is correct (and I did see some articles to the opposite) but if I'd suggest calling Panasonic tech service.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe Bemier wrote:

Draining a NiCd or NiMH cell completely means to remove essentially all the energy it contains. This requires discharging it to a cell voltage of about 1.0 volt. Doing this, then recharging, is the way to reverse "memory" (voltage depression) effects. If the battery has 6 cells or fewer and they're reasonably well matched, you can usually safely discharge the battery to 1.0 volt times the number of cells (e.g., 6.0 volts for a 6 cell battery) without risk of reverse charging one of the cells. If the battery has more cells, this becomes increasingly risky and the only safe way to do it is to discharge the cells in groups of 4-6. This of course requires getting into the battery pack.
The folks cautioning against trying to discharge down to 0 volts are absolutely correct. It just about guarantees reverse charging one or more cells, which will permanently damage those cells. Those cells will then have even more reduced capacity, so they'll go into reverse charge even earlier in the battery cycle the next time. There's never any need to discharge a cell below 1.0 volt. A well designed tool or electronic device intended for NiCd or NiMH power should quit operating and drawing battery current when the pack voltage reaches 1.0 volt per cell. Unfortunately, a lot aren't in this category.
Roy Lewallen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe Bemier wrote:

That's the problem with netnews and the Internet in general. Lot's of incorrect stuff that gets repeated over and over even by groups that should know better. Always check major manufacturers for the accurate information when there is controversial information.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 06 Aug 2006 04:39:49 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

Yes, and that includes the opinions that ppl are posting here - who knows which way to lean. Thats why I say calll Panasonic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I find nicads in drills last about two years. You got your use out of them.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Usually nicads are rated in how many charge cycles they can take. Around 300 to 600 cycles. I think that a partical charge is also a partical cycle but not sure. Some rechargables are just rated in number of years even if they are not used very often.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ralph Mowery wrote:

True, LiOn Cells will only have a useful life of about two years, after that they should be replaced, the same is true for LiPo batteries.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John McFerren wrote:

I keep hearing this. My real world experience is otherwise.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

I'm currently tracking an exception to the rule right now. A friend of mine was given a laptop that was "broken" for three years. I tightened a screw on the video card and it works fine. The battery of course was not replaced within those three years and the battery life is longer than the 30 minutes that I expected (more like 2 hrs but never fully tested).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.