Battery Drills: I now have 4 bad ones.

Page 2 of 3  


Freezing is a great idea, Heat sinking is not easy and still alows temp to rise, I have done it without ruining cells but its risky. Spot weld is best if that is what they do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

primecell spot welds all connections, dependable fast and no real battery heating
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
With all them duff batteries, I'd be breaking into all the packs to find all the cells that were capable of taking a charge, Then take a discharge reading off the individual cells ( I did that by loading them with a halogen bulb to discharge over mebbe a half hr) and make up a good pack for your favorite drill. The upside to the h freight drills is the battery packs are screwed together(least the drill master and chicago electric that I've had thus far)- makes breaking onto them and replacing them much easier, even if the drills are generally inferior to the brand names. Even if you have to buy a h freight battery pack for the cells (there are some that are 1.7 amp/hr batts- not bad but about half what good cells are rated for), it won't break the bank. Pat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 18 Nov 2008 08:05:06 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

>http://www.onlybatteries.com/cat_featured_items.asp?cat1R&cat=2&id=...Hide quoted text -

All the battery packs I've seen use tabbed batteries. No heat sink or welding is necessary.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

most replacement cells lack the tabs:(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
most replacement cells lack the tabs:(
**************************************************************************
Then they aren't replacements.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

so link to source of cells with tabs?
tabs vary depening on application, i have never seen replacement tabbed cells. and wonder how much more they would cost?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tabbed cells
https://www.batteryspace.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID 2
On Thu, 20 Nov 2008 04:33:27 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I frequently find my cordless drill has zero volts, I just charge it and use it anyway. I put 24 vdc (2 car batteries) across the 14.4 v battery for about 20 sec, and the voltage goes up to 15 vdc which is enough for the charger to work normally ;)
Free men own guns - www(dot)geocities(dot)com/CapitolHill/5357/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which implies it lasted at least 2 years...from HF. Was this a comment of dissatisfaction? What did you pay for it if I might ask and you recall?
I have my 18v Ridgid for "real" cordless drilling.
I have a cheapo B&D I use daily for all the misc light/med stuff. When it dies I'll toss it and get another, just like I tossed the prior cheapo Ryobi. That's what and all I expect of them. Maybe I'll try one of those econo HF's that are dirt cheap and can probably use an additional 15% off 1 item coupon.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Red:
As I recall, when I purchased the HF cordless drill, HF was selling the drill and a light as a kit for about $30.00 and if I purchased a spare 18.0 volt battery pack, then the total sale price was just under $40.00.
The comment was not intended to be a hit on HF. It was a comment on the marketing, and price point, susceptibility a consumer like me will fall for; my bad.
The cost of replacing my Sears 18.00 volt battery pack was something like $60.00. That Sears cordless 18.0 volt drill originally cost during a December Holiday sale (12/2001?) for something like $55.00 or so. Replacement power packs for that drill are no longer available. Replacement packs for my old Hitachi (?) from circa early 1990's haven't been around for many, many years. My original Sears cordless is from more than 20 years ago.
I expect this holiday season Sears and the BORGs will be having sales on cordless drill sets under $40.00 again. More land fill for the future.
For myself, I thinking more of a cord drill. If I can find one on Sale this holiday season. The cordless feature is no long worth the frustration of the battery pack.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Our 13.2 volt Bosch was our first experience with cordless a few years ago, a good tool and we were impressed. While overseas in 2007 I re-celled the battery packs. Then home again the charger went kaput. The replacement charger now costs $70+, in Canada. That's more than half the original cost of the Bosch with its two battery packs. Also in the face of our cheaper cordless drill that cost in total with it's two battery packs about $80! That and several other cordless acquired free with dud/weak batteries gets one thinking! One site was recommended for replacement cells; each cell costing anywhere from $2 to $4, plus shipping. For a 13.2 pack that's 11 cells (plus own labour), at least $50 to re cell one battery pack. Think I will pursue the DC power supply idea, since do have a 26 volt DC PS that could possibly be wired to DC outlets on work bench. For balance probably just leave cells in place but disconnected? If necessary can probably reduce the voltage of the power supply to around 15 or 18 volts or even 12 volts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

34 bucks at primecell, for higher capacity cells.
upgrade to lithium triple original capacity? for 52 bucks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LiIon dont last as many years, as of now. Charging is a bit different, many old chargers are not good enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For 40 bucks you dun good for an 18v. We never like them when they die even if it was bought with throw-away in mind.
The reason I like to have the likes of a B&D homeowner cheapo around is that it's smaller, light and easy to handle. I really wouldn't have wanted to use the 18v Ridgid today to unscrew a couple of countertopscrews in a 12" cabinet if ya know what I mean.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 17, 7:03pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Early in your post you said: "I can always run a cord to use a 120V plug in drill"
And then you followed up with "Since I could not drag a cord and 120v drill out in that rain..."
I guess "always" was a bit overstated, wasn't it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Nov 18, 1:28am, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Just a suggestion re a GFI equipped extension cord. We had one older style GFI duplex outlet that is capable only of protecting anything plugged into it. It is not, like more modern ones, capable of protecting other 'downstream' outlets. Fixing up an extension cable of reasonably heavy gauge, we placed that GFI on the end of it. So we now have a GFI equipped extension cord/cable which can be plugged into any outlet; inside the house for example and run out through a window etc. for safe use outside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We have several (of different brands) cordless drills etc. with dud batteries and are considering some sort of approx. 12 volt power supplies. Each probably capable of supplying say 5 to 10 amps. (120 watts?) into which we could plug these presently useless tools.
Such a PS would also provide isolation from AC mains for safety. Since they would be less portable than our working cordless drills would mainly be used at work benches. So we could have drills plugged in 'ready to go' at each location.
One possible source of transformers for suitable power supplies could be transformers from scrapped microwave ovens, of which we have several, providing pre-wound 115 volt primaries and metal transformer cores. Read an article not to long ago describing removing the fine gauge several thousand volt microwave secondaries and winding on heavier gauge low voltage ones.
Another possibility is to use m.wave oven the transformers backwards; however this may be impossible because in some cases one end of the higher voltage winding is grounded to the transformer frame.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Nov 2008 11:20:15 -0600, Phil Again

I buy individual batteries and replace the bad ones in the power pack. Been doing that for about 10 years.
Each of the batteries are 1.2 volts and the replacements are about twice as powerful as the originals (in the cheap drills), so your charge lasts a long time and your drills are more powerful than when new.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

if you only replace bad cells,then your pack's capacity is no more than what the ORIGINAL cells have.(and then you begin reverse-charging those cells,ruining them.)

IIRC,Hitachi used to make a cordless drill/driver that had an optional belt battery pack,it used a dummy battery pack in the drill's handle to connect power from the belt pack. Empty out a dead battery pack,wire in a coil cord and that to a power source that can supply several amps at the rated voltage.
Of course,with no batteries in the pack,the drill's balance will be gone.
Or you could buy newer Lithium-ion packs and a new charger,if available for your drill. Those hold their charge for months of storage.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.